Atharvaveda and Charaka Samhita

by Laxmi Maji | 2021 | 143,541 words

This page relates ‘Natural Treatment in the Vedas’ found in the study on diseases and remedies found in the Atharvaveda and Charaka-samhita. These texts deal with Ayurveda—the ancient Indian Science of life—which lays down the principles for keeping a sound health involving the use of herbs, roots and leaves. The Atharvaveda refers to one of the four Vedas (ancient Sanskrit texts encompassing all kinds of knowledge and science) containing many details on Ayurveda, which is here taken up for study.

Nature is a gift to man. Different theories of the earth such as earth, water, fire, air, sun and moon benefit human beings in one way or another. In Ṛgveda, Samaveda and Yajurveda, various deities were worshipped for healing. Namely–Mitrāvaruṇa[1], Savitā[2], Rudra[3] and Sun. The Sun is commonly called the soul of the world[4]. In the Upaniṣads, the Sun is called the life of the human world[5]. The sun mainly cures various diseases[6]. There is a detailed description of the treatment given by Sun-rays in the Vedas. The importance of rising sunlight has been proved in the Veda[7]. The rays of the rising sun are light red and these rays destroy all causes of death[8]. The Ṛgveda states that the rising sun cures all diseases of the heart, jaundice and anemia[9]. The Atharvaveda states that the rays of the rising sun (infrared) cure heart disease and anemia[10]. It is indicated here that the rays of the sun are to be applied according to the form, colour and longevity of man. The patient will keep his chest open for treatment in front of the rising sun or wear light clothes so that the sun's rays fall directly on the chest and have a greater effect. A mantra says that the rising sun destroys all diseases of the head, all kinds of heart ailments and all the pains of the limbs[11].

In the Atharvaveda, in the twenty-two mantra of a sūkta, the following diseases are cured by Sūrya Kiraṇa or sun-rays -headache, ear pain, anemia, hearing loss in the ears, blindness in the eyes, fever, jaundice, hydrocephalus etc. Seven types of energy are obtained from the seven types of rays of the sun[12]. Sūrya Kiraṇa saves us from death. The sun also destroys the poisonous effects of worms and insects and snakes. There are many names for sun-rays treatment namely-colour therapy, chromotherapy, chromopathy. The sun has seven colours. From which the human body is derived. The seven colours are-violet, indigo, blue, green, yellow, orange, red.

Its seven colours combine to form white. The main colour of the seven colours is three—red, yellow and blue. The red colour is more multiplier for iodine. Orange colours various diseases like pneumonia, influenza tuberculosis etc. The yellow colour is beneficial for worms, obesity, stomach diseases etc. Green colours fever, all kinds of skin diseases. The blue colour is very cool. Beneficial for fever, cough, diarrhoea, urinary incontinence etc. The indigo colour gives vitality to animals. Beneficial for vaginal, dysentery, testicular growth etc. Sleep is very good for violet colour and anemia is eliminated. In the Yajurveda, the Sun image is called Paramabrahma Svarūpa. Lord Sun is often glorified in Samaveda.

Another treatment among natural remedies is fire treatment. There are many types of the fire treatment. For example, direct consumption of fire, burning of fire in different parts of the body, destroying diseases and worms by pouring antiseptics in the fire. By heating clothes, bricks, etc., to get rid of the disease affected area and to keep the place of residence warm, etc. The Vedas say that fire is the medicine of cold. In other words, fire is beneficial in winter and cold-related diseases. Treatment of all diseases by fire like poison treatment and worm treatment[13]. In describing the nature of fire, it has been said that all the adjectives of thirty-three Gods are in the fire. The idea is that all the currents of energy are in the fire[14]. In the Atharvaveda, fire is said to be the cause of energy, energy, longevity and fame[15]. Fire is oxygen in the body in the form of oxygen. The fire of sacrifice destroys all rogānus[16]. It is said in the Ṛgveda that all the people who do not perform Yajña get sick. The śikhās of Agni heal the human beings and bring about their welfare[17].

The basis of human life is the Prāṇa. There is an assembly of life in every corner of the body. Diseases of the body originate only when the energy of the soul is reduced. Therefore, the special importance of Prāṇāyama treatment has been proved in natural medicine. Prāṇāyama is meant to spread the power of the soul. Again, with the relationship between the soul and the air. Prāṇa and Apāna act as two special forces in the body. The function of the Prāṇa vāyu is to take in oxygen from the air by breathing and reach the lungs, nourish all the capillaries with fresh air and expel the contaminants from the lungs by breathing. The function of Apāna Vāyu is to expel the contaminants from the body in the form of excrement and to keep the body clean. The Vedas describe the greatness of the life force. The life force is the husband of the world[18]. The power of the soul is the source of health and the incapacity of the soul is the cause of various diseases. Prāṇa is also called Mātariśvā and Vāyu[19].

Prāṇāyama is worth mentioning in Aṣṭāṅga-yoga. Prāṇāyama therapy is yoga therapy. Prāṇāyama treatment consists of a supplement of laxatives and an assembly of two kumbhakas. Inhalation is called Pūraka. Exhaling is called recaka. Stuck inside and out is called kumbhaka (inner kumbhaka and outer kumbhaka).In the Viṣṇu Purāṇa, two Prāṇāyamas are prevented by Prāṇa and Apāna and the third is Kumbhaka Prāṇāyama by stopping the time of both[20]. The more the śvāsa can be kept inside, the purer the blood will be. As a result, more energy is stored in the body and digestive energy is increased. The greatness of life force has been proved in Ṛgveda and Atharvaveda. The Atharvaveda says present, past, and future everything in the depends on the Prāṇa. The Prāṇa itself is herbal and medicinal. Prāṇa is the cure for the disease. Prāṇāyama keeps the body healthy and wholesome. The description of Yoga for Purification of the heart is found in the Śrīmadbhagavatgītā[21]. It is said in Manusaṃhitā, Metals like golds are purified by igniting the fire in the same way all the defects in the body are destroyed by Prāṇāyama[22]. In many mantras in Ṛgveda and Atharvaveda, the air is called herbal, cosmic, nectar etc. Air gives strength to the heart and people get longevity[23]. The wind is the protector of the man so he is called the father. The wind is, therefore, the brother, the wind is the helper, therefore the ally. Vāyu is the soul of man. The Ṛgveda clearly states that pure air enters the house freely and that house is pure. The free entry of fresh air into that room keeps the human body and heart clear, nourishes and provides longevity[24].

The Ṛgveda and the Atharvaveda have proved the importance of hydrotherapy and more in natural medicine. Rudra and Varuṇa are the foremost deities in water treatment[25]. Rudra is the first Divya Viṣaka. Rudra as a Water Physician[26]. Varuṇa has been called the husband of the Vaidyas and doctor. The Ṛgveda states that Somarāja's statement is all the medicinal properties of water exist[27]. All diseases are treated with water[28]. Another mantra says that water is nectar. The properties of all medicines exist in water. Water gives strength to the body and destroys diseases. People get longevity by drinking water mixed with Soma etc. Water cures heart disease. The various properties of water have been described in many verses. The water of all the rivers flowing out of the Himālayas is especially beneficial. This water has been applied to heart disease. The flowing water is purified and multiplied. Water empowers people and provides speed. You need water and medicine to be active. Rainwater is the best and nectar, all forms are removed by this water and longevity is obtained. Another quality of water is that water is a tonic and elegance is a sign of beauty. Water is a more useful substance for a physician[29]. Water destroys sin, sinful thoughts, nightmares. Water has an energy and divine qualities. Water provides energy. Depending on the place and the shelter, there are three types of water -uttama, madhyama and adhama. The water that is in the rays of the sun is the best. There is the fire in the water, so if the water is rubbed, electricity is generated. Many types of water are obtained-rain, river, sea, aquatic province, desert, cool province, digging soil holes, wells etc.[30] The Atharvaveda says that there are eight types of water in the body. Water entered the body with all the gods and Brahma. Hydrotherapy is called Jalāṣa bheṣaja. Rudra is a water therapist. Caraka, Suśruta, Vāgbhaṭṭa have given detailed descriptions on different forms of water and its usefulness.

Soil treatment also occupies an important place in natural medicine. The Vedas have provisions for the use of soil for treatment. The Atharvaveda says that bamī is made by expelling the soil from the dīmaka sea[31]. This bamī is haemorrhage medicine. This soil is also suitable for poisoning. Even in the Kalpa-sthāna of Suśruta-Saṃhitā, if a snake bites, the soil of bamī is mixed with milk, ghee and honey. Discussing the importance of soil in Nārāyaṇa Upaniṣads, it has been said that soil has many qualities and gives physical nutrition[32]. Diseases such as fever, abdominal cramps and colic are treated with clay.

In the Vedas, Yajña has been called a type of medical procedure. Four kinds of goods have been given in the form of sacrifices[33]. First, perfume -saffron, kasturi, sandalwood, etc. The second, nutritious -ointment, milk, fruit, food etc. Third, sweet-sugar, raisins, etc. and fourth, antiseptic-giloya, gugala, apāmārga etc. The Vedas describe the greatest importance of Yajña[34]. It is possible to maintain a natural balance by sacrificing. Adequate protection by sacrifice, attachment of the atmosphere to the eradication of various diseases, physical and mental improvement and longevity are achieved by curing the disease[35]. In Yajurveda, it is said that Yajña is a system of creation. Ghee of spring season, Samidhā of summer season and autumn season ingredients of this great sacrifice. The sacrificial process is the regulator in the world. In the Atharvaveda, it is said that in the house where the yajña is performed according to the rules, the disease and the worms themselves are destroyed. Sacrificing with Guggulu destroys all diseases. In the Ṛgveda and the Atharvaveda, a complete sūkta Yajña treatment is discussed. By Yajña the patient is discharged from tuberculosis and other unknown diseases. Sacrifice gives one hundred years of life and helps to overcome thousands of deaths[36].

The human mind is the cause of happiness and sorrow. If the mind is pure, then there is no disease, mourning etc. If the mind is impure, there are various diseases. Ṛgveda mentions psychiatric or psychological treatment. Ācārya Caraka mentions three types of diseases-self, stranger and psyche[37]. Mānas doṣa is produced due to Raja-guṇa and Tamaḥ-guṇa. For this reason, work, anger, iron, jealousy, alcohol, grief, thought, origin, fear and joy etc. The cause of the mental illness is the mind. Therefore, it is suitable for treatment. Psychiatry is said to have been treated by Varuṇadeva with psychological elements[38]. The mind is like a Brahma and like infinite power[39]. The Ṛgveda says that the mind is the cause of the disease and again the mind is its cure. The trend of moral development is to save the dying ally and give him full protection[40]. Psychological therapy also includes additional reassurance therapy and determination therapy to develop morale. In the Aṣṭāṅga Hṛdaya, Vāgbhaṭṭa says that a kind mind, free from envy, destroys all kinds of fever. The skilled physician enhances the patient's morale and can cure his disease by inhalation treatment. Therefore, purity of mind, transparency and righteousness can eradicate all kinds of diseases.

Mantra treatment is sound wave therapy. The sound that is produced from the mind goes up in the form of waves and enters the body of the devotee by absorbing the subtle energy of the subtle sun. The flow of this energy eliminates diseases in the body. The Ṛgveda and the Atharvaveda mention the power of mantras. It has been said in Ṛgveda. Mantra destroys diseases and diseased worms[41]. In the Vedic mantra, Indra is the abode of the original deity[42]. The Gāyatrī mantra contains nectar seeds[43]. If you recite Gāyatrī mantra, you will get longevity, Prāṇa, Prajā, kṛti etc.[44] The gods defeated the demons by the power of mantras[45]. Mantra power purifies and purifies the mind by destroying misery. Mantra medicine is a kind of strange medicine that includes music and sound power. Therefore, the quality of mantra energy increases.

In Ṛgveda and Atharvaveda, the disease was cured by touching hands[46]. This method of prevention is now known in comparison to Mesmerism and Hypnotism. There was a

lot of similarity in Vedic hand touching treatment. According to the Ṛgveda and the Atharvaveda, the rule of cure by hand touch is -there are two Vayu in the body, Prāṇa and Apāna. Prāṇa vāyu gives energy to the body and Apāna vāyu expels the faults of the body. All kinds of diseases are treated by these two winds. When treating a patient to cure a disease, spread your hands, open your fingers and feel the healing power in your hands, when you touch with both hands, say, may my two hands be soothing and pleasing to touch and remove all your diseases, energy is coming inside you and disease is being removed[47]. In this way, the patient's body is touched by the fingers and the hand is rotated. By this rule, the dying person can also be alive.

In the Ṛgveda and the Atharvaveda, Hypnotism is called dreaming[48]. In the Ṛgveda, this sūkta is called Prasvāpinī. According to the Ṛgveda and the Atharvaveda, the effect of this dreaming on women is greater. Rudra's hand has been called a healing medicinal form and a life-giving giver. In the Ṛgveda and the Atharvaveda, it is said that touching hand with mantras destroys various diseases[49].

The care of the patient is done by the attendant etc. This is called Upācāra treatment. The qualities and duties of the treatment attendant, the interaction with the patient, the use and the administration of the medicine to the patient can be observed. Caraka talks about the four qualities of a servant -namely -knowledge of service, cleverness, love for the patient and purity. The Atharvaveda contains some information on the treatment of Upācāra[50]. Firstly, the patient has close relatives, distant relatives or friends, etc.

Secondly, during the treatment, the patient will take any divagaṃta. Thirdly, the patient will be given medicine by his mother, father, brother and sister. Fourth, take medicine with love. Fifth, the patient's morale will increase and so on. The Śrīmatbhāgavatgītā says to be healthy and to be free from all sorrows namely-control overeating, the regularity of daily work, feeling of inability to do all the work and sleeping at the right time and waking up at the right time etc.[51]

The word Tridhātu is mentioned in Ṛgveda and Atharvaveda. In the Ṛgveda, Sāyaṇa explains of the Tridhātu which is vāta, pitta, and kapha. In a mantra in the Atharvaveda, it is said that Oja is spread in the body in three forms[52]. Sāyaṇa Tredhā has interpreted the word of vāta, pitta, and phlegmatic tridoṣa. The word pitta is mentioned in the Atharvaveda. The Tridoṣas of vāyu, pitta and phlegm are mentioned in the Aṣṭāṅga Hṛdayaṃ. If it is distorted, the body suffers and if it is undistorted, the body remains stable. It is said in the Śrīmadbhagavatgītā that when a man’s senses are subdued, his intellect is fixed. Addiction to the subject is thought by the mind, desire arises from addiction, and anger when desire is hindered, indiscretion from anger, unconsciousness is the destruction of memory[53]. The same thought is found in the Vedas.

Footnotes and references:

[1]:

māyāvāṃ mitrā varuṇā divi śritā sūryo jyoti?[?]ti citramāyudham |
tamabhreṇa vṛṣṭā guhathodivi parjanya dratsā madhumataṃ īrate ||
(ṚV. -V/63/4); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Ṛgveda Saṃhitā -Vol. II, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2016, p. 500.

[2]:

ākṛṣṇena rajasā vartamāno niveśayannamṛtaṃ martyaṃ ca |
hiraṇyayena savitārathenādeveyāti bhuvanāni paśyan ||
(ṚV. -I/34/2); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Ṛgveda Saṃhitā–Vol. I, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2016, p. 91.

[3]:

imā rudrāya tavase...... | (ṚV. -I/114/11); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Ṛgveda Saṃhitā -Vol. I, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2016, pp. 281-284.

[4]:

citraṃ devanāmudagādanīkaṃ cakṣurmitrasya varuṇasyāgneḥ |
āprā dyāvāpṛthivī antarikṣaṃ sūrya ātmā jagatastasthuṣaśca ||
(ṚV. -I/115/1); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Ṛgveda Saṃhitā -Vol. I, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2016, p. 284.

[5]:

sahasraraśmiḥ śatadhā vartamānaḥ prāṇaḥ prajānāmudayatyeṣa sūryaḥ | (P U–1/8) Chittaranjan Ghosal (ed.), Upaniṣad Sangraha, Kolkata, Anjan Bhaumick, 1987, p. 53.

[6]:

apa sedhat durmatim, ādityasaḥ | (ṚV. -X/100/8); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Ṛgveda–Vol. 4, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 448.

[7]:

apasedhatdurmatim, ādityasaḥ | (ṚV. -VIII/18/10); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Ṛgveda–Vol. 3, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 248.

[8]:

udyan sūryo nudatāṃ mṛtyupāśān | (AV. -XVII/1/30); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Atharvaveda–Vol. 2, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 250.

[9]:

udyannadya mitramaha ārohanuttarāṃ divam |
hṛdrogaṃ mama sūrya harimāṇaṃ ca nāśaya |
(ṚV. -I/50/11); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Ṛgveda–Vol. 1, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 121.

[10]:

anu sūryam udayatāṃ hṛddyoto harimā ca te |
go rohitasya varṇena tena tvā paridadhmasi |
(AV. -I/22/1); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Atharvaveda Saṃhitā -Vol. I, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2015, p. 39.

[11]:

saṃ te śīrṣṇḥ kapālāni hṛdayasya ca yo vidhuḥ |
udyan āditya raśmibhiḥ śīrṣṇo rogam anīnaśaḥ ||
(AV. -IX/8/22); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Atharvaveda Saṃhitā–Vol. II, Delhi. Parimal Publication, 2015, p. 275.

[12]:

sūryasya sapta raśmibhiḥ | (ṚV. -VIII/72/16); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Ṛgveda–Vol. 3, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 248.

[13]:

agniṃ ca viśvavaśaṃbhuvam | (ṚV. -I/23/20); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Ṛgveda–Vol. 1, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 60.

[14]:

śamagnibhiḥ karat | (ṚV. -VIII/18/9); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Ṛgveda Saṃhitā -Vol. III, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2016, pp. 422.

[15]:

tra trayastriṃśad yāni ca vīryāṇi tānyagniḥ pra dadātu me | (AV. -XIX/37/1); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Atharvaveda–Vol. 2, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 353.

[16]:

tamā harāmi nirṛterupasthad | (ṚV. -X/161/2); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Ṛgveda–Vol. 4, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 547.

[17]:

sarvāṃga sarvaṃ te cakṣuḥ sarvāmāyuśca te'vidam | (ṚV. -X/161/5); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Ṛgveda–Vol. 4, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 548.

[18]:

prāṇo ha sarvasyeśvaro yacca prāṇiti yacca na | (AV. -XI/4/10); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Atharvaveda Saṃhitā -Vol. II, Delhi. Parimal Publication, 2015, p. 422.

[19]:

prāṇamāhurmātariśvānaṃ vāto ha prāṇa ucyate |
prāṇe ha bhūtaṃ bhavyaṃ ca prāṇe sarvaṃ pratiṣṭhitam ||
(AV. -XI/4/15); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Atharvaveda Saṃhitā–Vol. II, Delhi. Parimal Publication, 2015, p. 423.

[20]:

Sri Baladev Upadhyaya & Srinivasa Rath (eds.) Sanskrit-Vāṅmaya Kā Bṛhad Itihāsa, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh Sanskrit Sansthan, 2006, p. 590.

[21]:

tatraikāgraṃ manaḥ kṛtvā yatacittendriyakriyaḥ |
upaviśyāsane yuñjyādyogamātmaviśuddhaye ||
(Gītā–6/12); Śrīmadbhagavatgītā with Śaṅkarabhāṣya, trans. Swami Basudevananda, Kolkata, S.N.U. Karyalaya, 2000, p. 481.

[22]:

dahyante dhmāyamānānāṃ dhātūnāṃ hi yathā malāḥ |
tathendriyāṇāṃ dahyante doṣāḥ prāṇasya nigrahāt ||
(Manusaṃhitā–6/71); Manabendu Bandhopadhyaya Sastri (ed.), Manusaṃhitā, Kolkata, Sanskrit Pustak Bhandar, 2004, p. 619.

[23]:

yadado vāta te gṛhe, amṛtasya nidhirhitaḥ | (ṚV. -X/186/3); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Ṛgveda Saṃhitā -Vol. IV, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2016, p. 576.

[24]:

maruto yasya hi kṣaye pāthā divo vimahasaḥ | sa sugopātamo janaḥ || (ṚV. -I/86/1); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Rigveda–Vol. 1, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 60.

[25]:

apsvantaramṛtamapsu bheṣajamapāmuta praśastaye | (ṚV. -I/23/19); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Ṛgveda Saṃhitā -Vol. I, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2016, p. 54.

[26]:

rudraṃ jalāṣabheṣajam |
tacchaṃ yoḥ sumnamīmahe ||
(ṚV. -I/43/4); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Ṛgveda–Vol. 1, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 105.

[27]:

apsu me somo abravīdantarviśvāni bheṣajā | (ṚV. -X/9/6); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Ṛgveda Saṃhitā -Vol. IIV, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2016, p. 209.

[28]:

āpa idvā u bheṣajīrāpo amīvacātanīḥ |
āpaḥ sarvasya bheṣajīstāste kṛṇvantu bheṣajam ||
(ṚV. -X/137/6); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Ṛgveda–Vol. 4, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 516.

[29]:

bhiṣanbhyo bhiṣaktarā āpo acchā vadāmasi | (AV. -XIX/2/3); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Atharvaveda Saṃhitā -Vol. III, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2015, p. 26.

[30]:

apo divyā acāyiṣaṃ rasena samapṛkṣmahi |
payasvānagna āgamaṃ taṃ mā saṃ sṛja varcasā ||
(AV. -VII/94/1); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Atharvaveda Saṃhitā -Vol. II, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2015, p. 105.

[31]:

upajīkā udbharanti samudrādadhi bheṣajam |
tadastrāvasya bheṣajaṃ tadu rogamaśīśamat ||
(AV. -II/3/4); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Atharvaveda Saṃhitā -Vol. I, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2015, p. 69.

[32]:

mṛttikedehi me puṣṭiṃ, tvayi sarvaṃ pratiṣṭhitam | Nārāyaṇopaniṣad–1/8.

[33]:

sarvāṃgasarvaṃtecakṣuḥsarvāmāyuścate'vidam |(ṚV. -X/161/5); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Ṛgveda–Vol. 4, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 548.

[34]:

tamā harāmi nirṛterupasthad | (ṚV. -X/161/2); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Ṛgveda Saṃhitā -Vol. IV, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2016, p. 555.

[35]:

śatāyuṣā haviṣāhārṣamenam |
śataṃ yathemaṃ śarado nayāti |
(ṚV. -X/161/3); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Ṛgveda–Vol. 4, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 547.

[36]:

yadi kṣitāyuryadi vā pareto yadi mṛtyorantikaṃ nīta eva |
tamā harāmi nirṛterupasthadaspārṣamenaṃ śataśāradāya ||
(ṚV. -X/161/2); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Ṛgveda Saṃhitā -Vol. IV, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2016, p. 555.

[37]:

trayo rogā iti -nijāgantumānasāḥ | (C. Sū. –11/45); Caraka Saṃhitā (Vol. I), trans. R. K. Sharma & Bhagwan Dash, Varanasi, Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office, 2017, p.226.
rajastamaśca mānasau doṣau | (C. Vi. –6/5); Caraka Saṃhitā (Vol. II), trans. R. K. Sharma & Bhagwan Dash, Varanasi, Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office, 2017, p. 185.

[38]:

tvaṃ manasā cikitsīḥ | (AV. -V/11/1); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Atharvaveda Saṃhitā -Vol. I, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2015, p. 391.

[39]:

mano vai samrāṭ paramaṃ brahma | Śatapatha Brāhmaṇa–14/6/10/15

[40]:

yamādahaṃ vaivasvatāt subandhormana ābharam |
jīvātave na mṛtyave
, atho ariṣṭatātaye || (ṚV. -X/60/10); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Ṛgveda–Vol. 4, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 333.

[41]:

d yumadamīvacātanaṃ rakṣohā | (ṚV. -VII/8/6); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Ṛgveda–Vol. 3, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 333.

[42]:

yasminnindro varuṇo mitro aryamā devā okāṃsi cakrire | (ṚV. -I/40/5); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Ṛgveda–Vol. 1, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 101.

[43]:

antargāyatryāmamṛtasya garbhe | (AV. -XIII/3/20); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Atharvaveda–Vol. 2, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 164.

[44]:

stutā mayā varadā vedamātā pra codayantāṃ pāvamānī dvijānām |
āyuḥ prāṇaṃ prajāṃ paśuṃ kīrti draviṇaṃ brahmavarcasam |
(AV. -XIX/71/1); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Atharvaveda–Vol. 2, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 386.

[45]:

yenāsurāṃ abhi devā asāma | (ṚV. -X/53/4); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Ṛgveda–Vol. 4, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 320.

[46]:

kva se te rudra mṛlayākurhasto yo asti bheṣajo jalāṣaḥ | (ṚV. -II/33/7); Acharya Vedanta Tirtha (ed.), Ṛgveda–Vol. 1, Delhi, Manoj Publication, 2012, p. 455.

[47]:

ayaṃ me hasto bhagavānayaṃ me bhagavattaraḥ |
ayaṃ me viśvabheṣajo'yaṃ śivābhimarśanaḥ ||
(AV. -IV/13/6); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Atharvaveda Saṃhitā -Vol. I, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2015, p. 280.

[48]:

hastābhyāṃ daśaśākhābhyāṃ jihvā vācaḥ purogavī |
anāmayitnubhyāṃ hastābhyāṃ tābhyāṃ tvābhi mṛśāmasi ||
(AV. -IV/13/7); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Atharvaveda Saṃhitā–Vol. I, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2015, p. 280.

[49]:

ā tvāgamaṃ śantātibhiratho ariṣṭatātibhiḥ |
dakṣaṃ ta ugramābhāriṣaṃ parā yakṣmaṃ suvāmi te ||
(AV. -IV/13/5); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Atharvaveda Saṃhitā -Vol. I, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2015, p. 279.

[50]:

āvatasta āvataḥ parāvatasta āvataḥ | (AV. -V/30/1); K. L. Joshi (ed.), Atharvaveda Saṃhitā -Vol. I, Delhi, Parimal Publication, 2015, p. 460.

[51]:

yuktāhāravihārasya yuktaceṣṭasya karmasu |
yuktasvapnāvavodhasya yogo bhavati duḥkhahā ||
(Gītā–6/17); Śrīmadbhagavatgītā with Śaṅkarabhāṣya, trans. Swami Basudevananda, Kolkata, S.N.U. Karyalaya, 2000, p. 488.

[52]:

ojaḥ sarvaśarīrasthaṃ snigdhaṃ śītaṃ sthiraṃ sitam | somātmakaṃ śarīrasya valapuṣṭikaraṃ matam || valaṃ ceṣṭāpāṭavam | yat tu suśrute "rasādīnāṃ śukrāntānāṃ dhātūnāṃ yat param tejastaṃ khalvojastadeva valam" iti atrāyamabhiprāyaḥ | yasmādrasādojo bhavati sa rasaḥ sarvvasthanagatatvāt tattaddhātuvanmanyata iti | sarvvadhātūnāṃ sneha ojaḥ kṣīre ghṛtamiva, tadeva balamiti | tatkāryyakāraṇa-yorabhedopacārāt, abhedakathanañca cikitsaikyārtham || Devendranath Sengupta & Upendranath Sengupta, Ayurveda Saṃgraha Part -I, Kolkata, Deepayan, 2009, p. 84.

[53]:

krodhādbhavati saṃmohaḥ saṃmohāt smṛtivibhramaḥ |
smṛtibhraṃśād vuddhināśo vuddhināśāt praṇaśyati ||
(Gītā–2/63); Śrīmadbhagavatgītā with Śaṅkarabhāṣya, trans. Swami Basudevananda, Kolkata, S.N.U. Karyalaya, 2000, p. 213.

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