Ayam, Ayaṃ, Ayaṁ: 5 definitions

Introduction

Ayam means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Āyam.—(SITI); ‘income’; tax in general. Note: āyam is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
context information

The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

ayaṃ : ((nom. sing. of ima), m.; f.) this person.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Ayaṃ, (pron.) (Sk. ayaṃ etc., pron. base Idg. *i (cp. Sk. iha), f. *ī. Cp. Gr. i)n, min; Lat. is (f. ea, nt. id); Goth is, nt. ita; Ohg. er (= he), nt. ez (= it); Lith. jìs (he), f. jì (she). ) demonstr. pron. “this, he”; f. ayaṃ; nt. idaṃ & imaṃ “this, it” etc. This pron. combines in its inflection two stems, viz. as° (ayaṃ in Nom. m. & f.) & im° (id° in Nom. nt.).

I. Forms. A. (sg.) Nom. m. ayaṃ Sn. 235; J. I, 168, 279; f. ayaṃ (Sk. iyaṃ) Kh VII. 12; J. II, 128, 133; nt. idaṃ Sn. 224; J. III, 53; & imaṃ Miln. 46. Acc. m. imaṃ J. II, 160; f. imaṃ (Sk. īmāṃ) Sn. 545, 1002; J. I, 280. Gen. Dat. m. imassa J. I, 222, 279 & assa Sn. 234, 1100; Kh VII. 12 (Dat.); J. II, 158; f. imissā J. I, 179 & assā (Sk. asyāḥ) J. I, 290; DhA. III, 172. Instr. m. nt. iminā J. I, 279; PvA. 80 & (peculiarly or perhaps for amunā) aminā Sn. 137; f. imāya (Sk. anayā) J. I, 267. The Instr. anena (Sk. anena) is not proved in Pāli. Abl. asmā Sn. 185; Dh. 220; & imasmā (not proved). Loc. m. nt. imasmiṃ Kh III, ; J. II, 159 & asmiṃ Sn. 634; Dh. 242; f. imissā PvA. 79 (or imissaṃ?) & imāyaṃ (no ref.).—B. (pl.) Nom. m. ime J. I, 221; Pv. I, 83; f. imā (Sk. imāḥ) Sn. 897 & imāyo Sn. 1122; nt. imāni (= Sk. ) Vin. I, 84. Acc. m. ime (Sk. imān) J. I, 266; II, 416; f. imā (Sk. imāḥ) Sn. 429; J. II, 160. Gen. imesaṃ J. II, 160 & esaṃ (Sk. eṣāṃ) M. II, 86, & esānaṃ M. II, 154; III, 259; f. also āsaṃ J. I, 302 (= etāsaṃ C.) & imāsaṃ. Instr. m. nt imehi J. VI, 364; f. imāhi. Loc. m. nt. imesu (Sk. eṣu) J. I, 307.

II. Meanings (1) ayaṃ refers to what is immediately in front of the speaker (the subject in question) or before his eyes or in his present time & situation, thus often to be trsld. by “before our eyes”, “the present”, “this here”, “just this” (& not the other) (opp. para), viz. atthi imasmiṃ kāye “in this our visible body” Kh III, ; yath’âyaṃ padīpo “like this lamp here” Sn. 235; ayaṃ dakkhiṇā dinnā “the gift which is just given before our eyes” Kh VII. 12; ime pādā imaṃ sīsaṃ ayaṃ kāyo Pv. I, 83; asmiṃ loke paramhi ca “in this world & the other” Sn. 634, asmā lokā paraṃ lokaṃ kathaṃ pecca na socati Sn. 185; cp. also Dh. 220, 410; J. I, 168; III, 53.—(2) It refers to what immediately precedes the present of the speaker, or to what has just been mentioned in the sentence; viz. yaṃ kiñci vittaṃ ... idam pi Buddhe ratanaṃ “whatever ... that” Sn. 224; ime divase these days (just gone) J. II, 416; cp. also Vin. I, 84; Sn. 429; J. II, 128, 160.—(3) It refers to what immediately follows either in time or in thought or in connection: dve ime antā “these are the two extremes, viz.” Vin. I, 10; ayaṃ eva ariyo maggo “this then is the way” ibid. ; cp. J. I, 280. ‹-› (4) With a touch of (often sarcastic) characterisation it establishes a closer personal relation between the speaker & the object in question & is to be trsld. by “like that, such (like), that there, yonder, yon”, e.g. imassa vānarindassa “of that fellow, the monkey” J. I, 279; cp. J. I, 222, 307; II 160 (imesaṃ sattānaṃ “creatures like us”). So also repeated as ayañ ca ayañ ca “this and this”, “so and so” J. II, 3; idañ c’idañ ca “such & such a thing” J. II, 5.—(5) In combination with a pron. rel. it expresses either a generalisation (whoever, whatever) or a specialisation (= that is to say, what there is of, i.e. Ger. und zwar), e.g. yâyaṃ taṇhā Vin. I, 10; yo ca ayaṃ ... yo ca ayaṃ “I mean this ... and I mean” ibid. ; ye kec’ime Sn. 381; yadidaṃ “i.e.Miln. 25; yatha-y-idaṃ “in order that” (w. pot.) Sn. 1092. See also seyyathīdaṃ.—(6) The Gen. of all genders functions in general as a possessive pron. of the 3rd = his, her, its (lit. of him etc.) and thus resembles the use of tassa, e.g. āsava’ssa na vijjanti “his are no intoxications” Sn. 1100; sīlaṃ assā bhindāpessāmi “I shall cause her character to be defamed” J. I, 290; assa bhariyā “his wife” J. II, 158 etc. frequent (Page 75)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Āyam (आयम्).—hold out, stretch, extend, lengthen, bend (a bow), put on or draw back (an arrow), throw (a lance), abs. take aim; stop, check, restrain, draw near, bring.

Āyam is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms ā and yam (यम्).

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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