Shukta, aka: Sūkta, Śukta, Sukta; 8 Definition(s)

Introduction

Shukta means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śukta can be transliterated into English as Sukta or Shukta, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Fermented liquors known as the Shukta (treacle, honey, fermented rice gruel, and curd cream kept in a new and clean vessel underneath a bushel of paddy for three consecutive days) bring on an attack of hæmoptysis. They disintegrate the lumps or knots of accumulated Kapham, are digestant and prove curative in jaundice and diseases due to the derangement of Kapham. They are light and vermifugenous, and strong and heat making in their potency. They act as diuretic, are pleasant, and pungent in digestion. Bulbs and roots pickled in Shukta acquire the properties of the latter.

Of the Shuktas prepared with treacle, juice of sugar-cane, or honey, each preceding one should be deemed heavier and as giving rise to greater secretions of internal organs than the one immediately following it in the order of enumeration.

(Source): archive.org: Sushruta samhita, Volume I
Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

Dharmaśāstra (religious law)

Śukta (शुक्त) is a Sanskrit word referring to “that which has been very much soured by the contact of the juice of other things”. The word is used throughout Dharmaśāstra literature such as the Manusmṛti. (also see the Manubhāṣya verse 4.211)

(Source): Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra
Dharmaśāstra book cover
context information

Dharmaśāstra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharma-shastra) is a category of Hindu literature containing important instructions regarding religious law, ethics, economics, jurisprudence and more. It is categorised as smṛti, an important and authorative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

Purāṇa

Śukta (शुक्त).—Heat making rays of the sun.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 53. 22.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purāṇa book cover
context information

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Mīmāṃsā (school of philosophy)

Sūkta (सूक्त) refers to one of the three principle styles found in Sanskrit literature.—Sūktas are the hymns of the Vedas, these are poetic compositions set to various different metres, some are comprehensible while others are cryptic and need interpretation.

(Source): Srimatham: Mīmāṃsa: The Study of Hindu Exegesis
context information

Mīmāṃsā (मीमांसा, mimamsa) refers to one of the six orthodox Hindu schools of philosophy, emphasizing the nature of dharma and the philosophy of language. The literature in this school is also known for its in-depth study of ritual actions and social duties.

General definition (in Hinduism)

Śukta (शुक्त)—Sanskrit word corresponding to “sour”, “astringent”, “putrid”,foul”,stinking” “bitterness”, “sour liquid” oracid beverage”.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

sūkta (सूक्त).—a (S su & ukta) Well-spoken or said: also well, good, right, commendable;--used of a matter in general whether spoken or done. See observation under suktāsukta.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

sūkta (सूक्त).—a Well-spoken or said. Well, right, commendable.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śukta (शुक्त).—p. p. [śuc-kta]

1) Bright, pure, clean; बलिषष्ठेन शुक्तेन दण्डेनाथापराधिनाम् (baliṣaṣṭhena śuktena daṇḍenāthāparādhinām) Mb.12.71.1.

2) Acid, sour; स्त्रीक्षीरं चैव वर्ज्यानि सर्वशुक्तानि चैव हि (strīkṣīraṃ caiva varjyāni sarvaśuktāni caiva hi) Ms.5.9;2.177.

3) Harsh, rough, hard, severe.

4) United, joined.

5) Deserted, lonely.

-ktam 1 Flesh.

2) Sour gruel.

3) A kind of acid liquid.

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

Relevant definitions

Search found 72 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Devisukta
Devīsūkta (देवीसूक्त).—a Sūkta addressed to Devī.Derivable forms: devīsūktam (देवीसूक्तम्).Devī...
Shuktapaka
Śuktapāka (शुक्तपाक).—acidity of stomach.Derivable forms: śuktapākaḥ (शुक्तपाकः).Śuktapāka is a...
Shrisukta
Śrīsūkta (श्रीसूक्त).—Name of a Vedic hymn (Ṛv.1.165). Derivable forms: śrīsūktam (श्रीसूक्तम्)...
Purusha-sukta
Puruṣasūkta (पुरुषसूक्त).—Brahmā praised Hari by this;1 to be uttered while installing a...
Paurushasukta
Pauruṣasūkta (पौरुषसूक्त).—Puruṣa sūkta of the Ṛg Veda to be recited before digging a tan...
Suktavali
1) Sūktāvalī (सूक्तावली) is the name of a work ascribed to Amaracandra (C. 1225-1300 C.E.): a J...
Rakshoghnasukta
Rakṣoghnasūkta (रक्षोघ्नसूक्त).—To be uttered in founding a new temple;1 to be uttered...
Narayana
Nārāyaṇa (नारायण) refers to one of the various Vibhava manifestations according to the Īśvarasa...
Purusha
Puruṣa (पुरुष) means “one who covers the whole world”. A puruṣa is a person who has full contro...
Saumya
Saumya (सौम्य) or Saumyasaṃhitā is the name of a Vaiṣṇava Āgama scripture, classified as a rāja...
Shudra
Śūdra (शूद्र) is the name of a caste (varṇa) mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa.—The Śūdras were t...
Ghosha
Ghoṣā (घोषा).—A tapasvinī famed in Ṛgveda. She was the grand-daughter of Dṛgata maharṣi and dau...
Prajapati
Prajāpati (प्रजापति) is the name of a deity who received the Vīrāgama from Tejas through the ma...
Kalinga
Kaliṅga (कलिङ्ग).—a.1) Clever.2) Cunning.-gāḥ (pl.) Name of a country and its inhabitants; (a d...
Rigveda
Ṛgveda (ऋग्वेद).—the oldest of the four Vedas, and the most ancient sacred book of the Hindus. ...

Relevant text

- Was this explanation helpful? Leave a comment:

Make this page a better place for research and define the term yourself in your own words.

You have to be a member in order to post comments. Click here to login or click here to become a member.