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Varada, aka: Varadā, Vāraḍa; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Varada means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Śaivism (Śaiva philosophy)

Varada (वरद) is the Sanskrit name of a deity presiding over Liṅgeśvara, one of the sixty-eight places hosting a svāyambhuvaliṅga, which is one of the most sacred of liṅgas according to the Śaivāgamas. The list of sixty-eight svāyambhuvaliṅgas and presiding deities (eg., Varada) is found in the commentary on the Jirṇoddhāra-daśaka by Nigamajñānadeva. The word liṅga refers to a symbol used in the worship of Śiva and is used thoughout Śaiva literature, such as the sacred Āgamas.

Source: Wisdom Library: ŚaivismŚaivism book cover
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Śaiva (शैव, shaiva) or Śaivism (shaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Śiva as the supreme being. Closeley related to Śāktism, Śaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Śilpaśāstra (iconography)

Varada (वरद) is a Sanskrit name referring to one of the eight manifestations of Unmatta, who is a form of Bhairava. According to the Rudrayāmala, there are eight main forms of Bhairava who control the eight directions of this universe. Each form (eg., Unmatta) has a further eight sub-manifestations (eg., Varada), thus resulting in a total of 64 Bhairavas.

When depicting Varada according to traditional iconographic rules (śilpaśāstra), one should depcit him (and other forms of Unmatta) having a white color and good looks; he should carry in his hands the kuṇḍa, the kheṭaka, the parigha (a kind of club) and bhiṇḍipāla. The word Śilpaśāstra refers to an ancient Hindu science of arts and crafts, dealing with subjects such as painting, sculpture and iconography.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śilpa-śāstraŚilpaśāstra book cover
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Śilpaśāstra (शिल्पशास्त्र, shilpa-shastra) represents the ancient Indian science of creative arts such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vāstuśāstra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

Purāṇa

Varada (वरद, “boon-giver”) refers to one of the fifty-six vināyakas located at Kāśī (Vārāṇasī), and forms part of a sacred pilgrimage (yātrā), described in the Kāśīkhaṇḍa (Skanda-purāṇa 4.2.57). He is also known as Varadavināyaka, Varadagaṇeśa and Varadavighneśa. These fifty-six vināyakas are positioned at the eight cardinal points in seven concentric circles (8x7). They center around a deity named Ḍhuṇḍhirāja (or Ḍhuṇḍhi-vināyaka) positioned near the Viśvanātha temple, which lies at the heart of Kāśī, near the Gaṅges. This arrangement symbolises the interconnecting relationship of the macrocosmos, the mesocosmos and the microcosmos.

Varada is positioned in the North-Eastern corner of the third circle of the kāśī-maṇḍala. According to Rana Singh (source), his shrine is located at “Rajghat area, Prahlad Ghat, A 13 / 19”. Worshippers of Varada will benefit from his quality, which is defined as “the giver of all sorts of boons”. His coordinates are: Lat. 25.19421, Lon. 83.01700 (or, 25°11'39.2"N, 83°01'01.2"E) (Google maps)

Kāśī (Vārāṇasī) is a holy city in India and represents the personified form of the universe deluded by the Māyā of Viṣṇu. It is described as a fascinating city which is beyond the range of vision of Giriśa (Śiva) having both the power to destroy great delusion, as well as creating it.

Varada, and the other vināyakas, are described in the Skandapurāṇa (the largest of the eighteen mahāpurāṇas). This book narrates the details and legends surrounding numerous holy pilgrimages (tīrtha-māhātmya) throughout India. It is composed of over 81,000 metrical verses with the core text dating from the before the 4th-century CE.

Source: Wisdom Library: Skanda-purāṇa

1) Varada (वरद).—A name of Vighneśvara.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 44. 69.

2) Varadā (वरदा).—R. one of the seven rivers in Śivapuram.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 101. 243.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana IndexPurāṇa book cover
context information

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Vāstuśāstra (architecture)

Varada (वरद) refers to classification of a temple/buidling (prāsāda), according to Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra chapter 60. The temple is mentioned in a list of thirty-six Prāsādas having activities of the townsmen entailing Sādhārās. The Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra is an 11th-century encyclopedia dealing with various topics from the Vāstuśāstra.

Source: Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstra
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Vāstuśāstra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vastu-shastra) refers to the knowledge of architecture. It is a branch of ancient Indian science dealing with topics such architecture, construction, sculpture and their relation with the cosmic universe.

Āyurveda (science of life)

1) Vāraḍa (वारड) is a Sanskrit word referring to the “spoonbill”. The meat of this animal is part of the māṃsavarga (‘group of flesh’), which is used throughout Āyurvedic literature. The animal Vāraḍa is part of the group of birds named Vartakādi, which is a sub-group of Viṣkira, refering to “birds similar to common quail who eat while scattering the gains”. It was classified by Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Āyurvedic work. Caraka defined such groups (vargas) based on the dietic properties of the substance.

2) Varadā (वरदा) is another name (synonym) for Ajagandhā, which is the Sanskrit word for Cleome gynandra (stinkweed), a plant from the Cleomaceae family. Ajagandhā is also known as Tilaparṇikā, which is classified as a vegetable (śāka) by Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Āyurvedic work.

Varadā was identified as a synonym for Ajagandhā in the Bhāvaprakāśa, which is a 16th-century medicinal thesaurus authored by Bhāvamiśra.

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

In Buddhism

Pali

varada : (adj.) giver of the best things.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English DictionaryPali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

Relevant definitions

Search found 72 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Varadamudra
Varadamudrā (वरदमुद्रा) is a Sanskrit word referring to “the gesture of granting boons...
Varadavinayaka
Varadavināyaka (वरदविनायक) is short for Varada (boon-giver), one of the the fifty-six vināyakas...
Varadavighnesha
Varadavighneśa (वरदविघ्नेश) is short for Varada (boon-giver), one of the the fifty-six vināyaka...
Varadaganesha
Varadagaṇeśa (वरदगणेश) is short for Varada (boon-giver), one of the the fifty-six vināyakas acc...
Varadahasta
The Varadahasta (वरदहस्त)  shows the pose of the hand while conferring a boon. In this ...
Rudra
1) Rudra (रुद्र).—The rudras are a group of celestial beings living in the lower regions of adh...
Parvati
Pārvatī (पार्वती).—Sculptures of Pārvatī, called by different names locally, are available in g...
Vijaya
Vijayā (विजया) refers to “the triumphant one” and is the presiding deity of mṛdu (‘tender’), ac...
Padma
Padma (पद्म, “lotus”) refers to a derivative color, composed of the white (sita) and the red (r...
Shiva
Śiva (शिव) is the father of Puruṣasiṃha: the fifth Vāsudeva according to both Śvetāmbara and Di...
Ishana
Īśana (ईशन) is the Sanskrit name of a deity presiding over Kedāra, one of the sixty-eight pl...
Bhima
Bhīma (भीम) is the name of class of rākṣasas according to both the Digambara and the Śvetāmbara...
Ananta
Ananta (अनन्त) refers to an aspect of nṛsiṃha (‘man-lion’), according to the Vihagendra-saṃhitā...
Skanda
Skanda (स्कन्द) is the name of a gaṇa (attendant of Śiva), mentioned in the Skandapurāṇa 4.2.53...
Shankara
Śaṅkara (शङ्कर) is the Sanskrit name of a deity presiding over Kurucandra, one of the sixty-...

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Search found 46 books containing Varada, Varadā or Vāraḍa. You can also click to the full overview containing English textual excerpts. Below are direct links for the 20 most relevant articles:


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