Ghi, Ghee, Ghī: 11 definitions

Introduction:

Ghi means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

1) Ghi (घि).—A tech. term applied to noun bases or Prātipadikas ending in इ (i) and उ (u) excepting the words सखि (sakhi) and पति (pati) and those which are termed नदी (nadī); cf. P. I. 4.79;

2) Ghi.—A conventional term for लधु (ladhu) (a short vowel) found used in the Jainendra Vyakarana.

context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: archive.org: Rasa-Jala-Nidhi: Or Ocean of indian chemistry and alchemy

Ghee refers to “clarified butter”. (see Bhudeb Mookerji and his Rasajalanidhi)

Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Asian Agri-History: Paśu Āyurvēda (Veterinary Medicine) in Garuḍapurāṇa

Ghee (is Sanskrit: ghṛta, ājya) is used in the protection rites of Horses (Aśvarakṣaṇa), according to Āyurveda sections in the Garuḍapurāṇa.—For the Rakṣa (protection) Revanta-pūjā, (worship of God Revanta) homa (sacrificial offerings) and dvija-bhojana (feeding of Brahmins) should be performed in favor of the horse. And a compound made up of following drugs should be tied round the neck of the horse [e.g., ghṛta (ghee)] [...].

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: archive.org: Village folk-tales of Ceylon

liquid butter;

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Ghee is a class of clarified butter that originated in South Asia and is commonly used in South Asian (Indian, Bangladeshi, Nepali and Pakistani) cuisine and ritual.

The word ghee comes from Sanskrit: घृत (ghṛta, 'sprinkled') and has several names around the world

  • Bengali: ঘী ghee,
  • Punjabi: ਘਿਉ ghyo,
  • Hindi: घी ghī,
  • Gujarati: ઘી ghī,
  • Maithili/ Nepali: घ्यू ghyū,
  • Urdu: گھی ghī,
  • Oriya: ଘିଅ gheeo,
  • Marathi/Konkani: तूप tūp,
  • Kannada: ತುಪ್ಪ tuppa,
  • Malayalam: നെയ്യ് ney,
  • Tamil: நெய் ney,
  • Telugu: నెయ్యి neyyi,
  • Somali: subaag,
  • Arabic: سمنة samna,
  • Persian: روغن حیوانی roghan-e heivani,
  • Georgian: ერბო erbo,
  • Indonesian: minyak samin,
  • Malay: minyak sapi,
  • Hausa: man shanu

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

Ghī (घी).—n ( H) Clarified butter, ghee. This word, though well known, is little used by Maraṭha people. Pr. ghī gayā para kupā tō gayā nahīṃ A Hindustani proverb but common. The ghee may be gone, but the bottle remains. Used in hinting to one who is making some false assertion, that, though the matter be past, all documents respecting it are not lost.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

Ghī (घी).—n Clarified butter, ghee.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Ghī (घी) [Also spelled ghee]:—(nm) ghee; —[ke cirāga/die jalānā] lit. to light up ghee lamps -to celebrate (the fulfilment of some cherished desire) by fanfare/merry-making/festivity; —[khicaḍi/śakkara honā] to be hand in glove with; to be in intimate association; to become inseparably united; —[dūdha kī nadī bahanā] to be very prosperous and affluent.

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Ghee in Hindi refers in English to:—(nm) ghee; —[ke ciraga/die jalana] lit. to light up ghee lamps -to celebrate (the fulfilment of some cherished desire) by fanfare/merry-making/festivity; —[khicadi/shakkara hona] to be hand in glove with; to be in intimate association; to become inseparably united; —[dudha ki nadi bahana] to be very prosperous and affluent..—ghee (घी) is alternatively transliterated as Ghī.

context information

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Ghi (घि) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Grīṣma.

Ghi has the following synonyms: Ghiṃsu.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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