Svarupa, Svarūpa, Sva-rupa: 15 definitions

Introduction

Svarupa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Svarūpa (स्वरूप) refers to one of the twenty prakāras: rules used in the playing of drums (puṣkara) [with reference to Mṛdaṅga, Paṇava and Dardura] according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 33. Accordingly, “when the playing has a simple nature and is done by sama-pāṇi, and follows its own fixed pattern, it is called Svarūpa”.

Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Samkhya (school of philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Sāṃkhya philosophy

Svarūpa (स्वरूप, “homogeneous”) refers to one of the two types of pariṇāma (change) according to the Sāṃkhya theory of evolution. It is also known as sadṛśa. Svarūpa-pariṇāma occurs during pralaya (dissolution), when each guṇa goes on transforming in itself without establishing dominance over the other guṇas. Pariṇāma refers to the ‘change’ or ‘flux’ occurring in prakṛti (matter), but which is absent in puruṣa (consciousness).

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Samkhya (सांख्य, Sāṃkhya) is a dualistic school of Hindu philosophy (astika) and is closeley related to the Yoga school. Samkhya philosophy accepts three pramanas (‘proofs’) only as valid means of gaining knowledge. Another important concept is their theory of evolution, revolving around prakriti (matter) and purusha (consciousness).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Svarūpa (स्वरूप).—An asura. This asura remains in the palace of Varuṇa and serves him. (Sabhā Parva, Chapter 9, Verse 14).

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: JQ's Likhita Japa Journal: Hinduism

Svarūpa in Sanskrit this means “lover of beauty”. This is one of the 108 names of Lord Ganesha.

Source: Ashtanga Yoga: Yoga Sutrani Patanjali

svarūpa = own form; true nature; true form

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Svarūpa (स्वरूप) refers to a class of bhūta deities according to the Digambara tradition of Jainism, while Śvetāmbara does not recognize this class. The bhūtas refer to a category of vyantaras gods which represents one of the four classes of celestial beings (devas).

The deities such as the Svarūpas are defined in ancient Jain cosmological texts such as the Saṃgrahaṇīratna in the Śvetāmbara tradition or the Tiloyapaṇṇati by Yativṛṣabha (5th century) in the Digambara tradition.

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 4: The celestial beings (deva)

Svarupa (स्वरुप) refers to one of the two Indras (lords) of the Bhūta class of “peripatetic celestial beings” (vyantara), itself a main division of devas (celestial beings) according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 4.6. Pratirupa and Svarupa are the two lords in the class ‘devil’ peripatetic celestial beings.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Svarūpa.—(SITI), an estate of the Nambūdris, royal per- sonages, etc., of Malai-nāḍu. Note: svarūpa is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

svarūpa (स्वरूप).—n (S) One's own proper figure or form; the natural and real figure and general appearance. 2 One's countenance, visage, look, features. 3 The natural constitution, quality, or condition, nature. 4 The native or appropriate form, mode, or character of being.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

svarupa (स्वरुप).—n One's own form; one's visage. Nature.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Svarūpa (स्वरूप).—a.

1) similar, like.

2) handsome, pleasing, lovely.

3) learned, wise. (-pam) 1 one's own form or shape, natural state or condition; तत्रान्यस्य कथं न भावि जगतो यस्मात् स्वरूपं हि तत् (tatrānyasya kathaṃ na bhāvi jagato yasmāt svarūpaṃ hi tat) Pt.1.159.

2) natural character or form, true constitution.

3) nature.

4) peculiar aim.

5) kind, sort, species. °असिद्धि (asiddhi) f. one of the three forms of fallacy called असिद्ध (asiddha) q. v.

Svarūpa is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms sva and rūpa (रूप).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Svarūpa (स्वरूप).—mfn.

(-paḥ-pā or -pī-paṃ) 1. Wise, learned. 2. Pleasing, handsome. 3. Similar, like. 4. Of like purport or character. n.

(-paṃ) 1. Natural state or condition, nature. 2. Natural and obvious purpose or conclusion. 3. True constitution, natural character. 4. One's own form or shape. 5. Peculiar aim. 6. Kind, sort. E. sva own, rūpa form.

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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