Vata, aka: Vāṭa, Vaṭa, Vāta; 29 Definition(s)

Introduction

Vata means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

One of the Hands indicating Trees.—Vata (banyan), the Patāka hand.

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)
Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Ayurveda (science of life)

1) Vāta (वात) refers to one of the three Doṣas (tridoṣa), representing the “airy element” of the human body. It is also known as Vāyu. It is used throughout Āyurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā and the Suśruta-saṃhitā. The three doṣas are three bodily humors, which when in balance, sustain perfect human health. According to Dṛḍhabala, Vāta-doṣa is situated in the basti (pelvic region). The quantum of Vāta-doṣa fluctuates during old age, the last period of day and night and after the food is digested. It also fluctuates according to the different seasons: during summer (grīṣma) it accumulates, during monsoon (varṣā) it aggrevates and during autumn (śarada) it pacifies. It is important to keep track of these fluctuations in order to prevent seasonal disorders.

2) Vaṭa (वट) is a Sanskrit word referring to a type of vegetable. Certain plant parts of Vaṭa are eaten as a vegetable (śāka), according to Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Āyurvedic work. The plant is therefore part of the Śākavarga group of medicinal plants, referring to the “group of vegetables/pot-herbs”. Caraka defined such groups (vargas) based on the dietic value of the plant. Botanical synonyms of the plant include: Maerua arenaria and Niebhuria arenaria.

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

1) Vaṭa (वट) is the name of a tree (Baḍa) that is associated with the Nakṣatra (celestial star) named Maghā, according to the second chapter (dharaṇyādi-varga) of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu (an Ayurvedic encyclopedia). Accordingly, “these [trees] are propounded in Śāstras, the secret scriptures (śāstrāgama). These pious trees [viz, Vaṭa], if grown and protected, promote long life”. These twenty-seven trees related to the twenty-seven Nakṣatras are supposed to be Deva-vṛkṣas or Nakṣatra-vṛkṣas.

2) Vaṭa (वट) refers to one of the three doṣas (the other being Kapha and Pitta), according to the second chapter (dharaṇyādi-varga), verses 67-68. Accordingly, “the substances, which alleviate vāta, are good digestive and appetizers. Similarly, a drug which alleviates kapha, is also appetizer and slightly digestive stimulant. But, a drug reducing the action of pitta, is not a good digestive. A substance which is heavy (guru), śīta, vīrya and anti-pitta, will aggravate vāta-doṣa. Similarly, a substance which is light, uṣṇa, vīrya, anti-vāta, will alleviate kapha and increase pitta-doṣa”.

Source: Wisdom Library: Raj Nighantu

Vata – Wind or Gas, composed of Ether and Air (see Tridosha).

Source: Google Books: Exploring Mantric Ayurveda

Vāta (वात).—The word ‘vāta’ is derived from the verb-root ‘vā’ meaning ‘to move’, ‘to inform’ and ‘to impel’ which are the natural actions of Vāta. Enthusiasm, respiration, movement, normal transportation of dhātus (‘nutrients’), proper elimination of excrete—these are the normal functions of Vāta. All motions, transportation, and electromagnetic activities are controlled by vāta.

Causes of aggravation:—Vāta is aggravated by intake of rough, bitter, astringent and pungent substances, fasting, suppression of natural urges, physical exertion, excessive cold, wasting of dhātus, mental worry, keeping awake in night, in early rains, old age, last phase of day and night, and after the food is digested.

Symptoms:—Aggravation of Vāta gives rise to pain in abdomen, pain, stiffness, contraction and heaviness in the body, blackish stool, emaciation, loss of sleep, roughness in skin, instability of mind, irregularity of digestion, abnormal taste and dryness in mouth.

Treatment:—Vāta, Pitta and Kapha should be treated with eliminative therapy (known as ‘pañcakarma’). Thereafter they should be pacified with prescribed measures relating to diet, drug and activity. Vāta is pacified, like a friend, with sneha (soothing-unctuous substances), intake of sweet, sour and salty items, sudation, rest, sleep and exhilaration.

Source: Google Books: Essentials of Ayurveda

Vāta (वात).—One of the three biological humors (tridoṣa).—Vāta is connected to prāṇa or the life-force and is the prime manifestation of prāṇa in the body. The factors that generate motion and vitality in the body constitute vāta-doṣa. Vāta is the originator of all movements in the body. It governs all nervous functions, controls the mind, senses and motor organs.

Vāta is also responsible for stimulation of digestive juices and enzymes that break down and digest food. The empty spaces in all channels (srotas) of the body are constituted by vāta.

Each of the five types of vāta have different places of origin and different actions, which are responsible for different ailments:

  1. prāṇa (located in the head, chest and brain)
  2. udāna (located in the throat and lungs),
  3. samāna (located in the stomach and intestinal tract),
  4. apāna (located in the colon, lower abdomen and organs of the pelvic region),
  5. vyāna (permeates the entire body especially the heart)
Source: Google Books: A Practical Approach to the Science of Ayurveda

Vata can be kept at bay by not consuming foods which are not cold, dry, stale, rich in spices, bitter and astringent tastes, avoiding cold breeze, excessive sex, vigil and exercise, keeping away from anxiety, fear and stress, managing rainy season etc – This will prevent the further degeneration process of tendons and nerves.

Source: Easy Ayurveda: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Symptoms

Concept of ‘Vāta’: All functions of nervous system in human body are represented through ‘Vāta’ in Ayurveda. In general, the functions ascribed to ‘Vāta’ are: Control and coordination of different parts of the body, initiation of all movements, regulation of psychological processes, initiation of all activities of sense organs, transmission of different sensations, production of speech, secreto-motor functions in the gut, expulsion of wastes from the body and control of respiration (Caraka-saṃhitā Sūtrasthāna 12/8).

Vāta is divided into five sub types –

  1. Prāṇa-vāta,
  2. Udāna-vāta,
  3. Vyāna-vāta,
  4. Samāna-vāta
  5. and Apāna-vāta.
Source: Cogprints: Concepts of Human Physiology in Ayurveda

The word ‘Vāta’ is derived from the verb ‘Vā’ which means Gati (motion). This Doṣa is responsible for all the movements in the body. It is of 5 types viz,

  1. Prāṇa Vāyu,
  2. Udāna Vāyu,
  3. Samāna Vāyu,
  4. Vyāna Vāyu
  5. and Apāna Vāyu.
Source: Hand book of domestic medicine: Basic principles of Āyurveda
Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Vaṭa (वट) is a Sanskrit word, identified with Ficus bengalensis (banyan) by various scholars in their translation of the Śukranīti. This tree is mentioned as bearing good fruits. The King should plant such domestic plants in and near villages. He should nourish them by stoole of goats, sheep and cows, water as well as meat.

The following is an ancient Indian recipe for such nourishment of trees:

According to Śukranīti 4.4.105-109: “The trees (such as vaṭa) are to be watered in the morning and evening in summer, every alternate day in winter, in the fifth part of the day (i.e., afternoon) in spring, never in the rainy season. If trees have their fruits destroyed, the pouring of cold water after being cooked together with Kulutha, Māṣa (seeds), Mudga (pulse), Yava (barley) and Tila (oil seed) would lead to the growth of flowers and fruits. Growth of trees can be helped by the application of water with which fishes are washed and cleansed.”

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra
Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

1) Vaṭa (वट).—One of the five attendants given to Subrahmaṇya by the god Aṃśa. The five attendants were Vaṭa, Parigha, Bhīma, Dahati, and Dahana. (Mahābhārata Śalya Parva, Chapter 45, Stanza 34).

2) Vāta (वात).—One of the Saptarṣis (seven hermits) of the Manvantara (Age of the Manu) of Manu Svārociṣa. In this age of the Manu the Devendra was Vipaścit. The Saptarṣis of that Age of the Manu were Ūrja, Stamba, Prāṇa, Vāta, Vṛṣabha, Niraya and Parīvān. (Viṣṇu Purāṇa, Aṃśa 3, Chapter 1).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1) Vaṭa (वट).—A sacred tree in Prayāgā, protected by Śūlapāṇi;1 he who dies underneath the tree goes to Rudraloka;2 the residence of the 12 Ādityas at;3 Vaṭa itself is Maheśvara.4

  • 1) Matsya-purāṇa 104. 10; Vāyu-purāṇa 108. 57.
  • 2) Matsya-purāṇa 106. 11.
  • 3) Ib. 106. 12.
  • 4) Ib. 111. 10; Vāyu-purāṇa 111. 88-82.

2a) Vāta (वात).—The Rākṣasa presiding over the month of Tapas; with the śarat Sun.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa XII. 11. 39; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 23. 15; Vāyu-purāṇa 52. 15; Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 10. 11.

2b) A son of Yātudhāna, and father of Virodha who was death to the people.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 89 and 96.

2c) A son of Śūra.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 71. 138; Vāyu-purāṇa 96. 136.

2d) A piśāca.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 127.

2e) One of the seven seers of the Svārociṣa epoch.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa III. 1. 11.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Vaṭa (वट) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.52.15, I.57, IX.44.31) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Vaṭa) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

1) Vaṭa (वट)—Sanskrit word for the plant “banyan tree” (Ficus bengalensis).

2) Vāta (वात, “wanderer”):—Another name for Vāyu, a Vedic deity representing the cosmic life breath (the universal spirit).

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Vāta or Vata (wind) is the impulse principle necessary to mobilize the function of the nervous system. It affects the windy humour, flatulence, gout, rheumatism, etc.

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Vāta (वात) is another name for Prabhañjana: protector deity of the north-western cremation ground.—The northwest (vāyavī) is protected by Prabhañjana (Vāyu), hence listed also as the wind, Vāta (Śmaśānavidhi 18), but—problematically, suggesting the southwest—as Rākṣasendra/Rākṣasa in Saṃvarodayatantra 17.39. He is described in the Adbhutaśmaśānālaṃkāra and Śmaśānavidhi as blue/smoke-colored (respectively), mounted on an antelope (mṛga), holding a yellow banner (dhvaja) and skull bowl.

Source: Google Books: Vajrayogini

Vaṭa (वट) is the name of the tree (vṛkṣa) associated with Aṭṭaṭṭahāsa: the north-eastern cremation ground (śmaśāna) according to the Saṃvarodayatantra. The tree associated with the north-east is sometimes given as Trivaṭa or Nyagrodha. As a part of this sādhana, the practicioner is to visualize a suitable dwelling place for the goddess inside the circle of protection which takes the form of eight cremation grounds.

These trees (eg., Vaṭa) that are associated with the cremation grounds are often equated with the eight bodhi-trees of the Buddhas (the current buddha plus the seven previous one). According to the Śmaśānavidhi each tree has a secondary tree (upavṛkṣa) that is depicted as lovely and covered in vaṅga flowers and fruit. In each tree lives a naked rākṣasa who is wrathful in form, who eats human flesh and who has the animal face or the mount of the dikpati in his cremation ground.

Source: Wisdomlib Libary: Vajrayogini
Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Vaṭa (वट) refers to a kind of tree (vṛkṣa) commonly found in the forests (vaṇa) of ancient India, mentioned in the Jñātādharmakathāṅga-sūtra. Forests have been a significant part of the Indian economy since ancient days. They have been considered essential for economic development in as much as, besides bestowing many geographical advantages, they provide basic materials for building, furniture and various industries. The most important forest products are wood and timber which have been used by the mankind to fulfil his various needs—domestic, agricultural and industrial.

Different kinds of trees (eg., the Vaṭa tree) provided firewood and timber. The latter was used for furniture, building materials, enclosures, staircases, pillars, agricultural purposes, e. g. for making ploughs, transportation e. g. for making carts, chariots, boats, ships, and for various industrial needs. Vaṇa-kamma was an occupation dealing in wood and in various otherforest products. Iṅgāla-kamma was another occupation which was concerned with preparing charcoal from firewood.

Source: archive.org: Economic Life In Ancient India (as depicted in Jain canonical literature)

1) Vaṭa (वट) or nyagrodha refers to a “Ficus bengalensis”: one of the five udumbara fruits considered forbidden to eat for Jain laymen, as listed under the khādima category of forbidden food (āhāra), according to Amitagati in his 11th century Śrāvakācāra (v6.96-97). The udumbaras, perhaps because they live long and have nutritive fruits, perhaps because of their milky latex, have been identified with the source of all fertility, and possibly owing to the ceaseless rustling of their leaves have been regarded as homes of the spirits of the dead.

2) Vaṭa (वट) in Sanskrit or Vaḍa in Prakrit refers to the banyan (Ficus bengalensis), the shoots (aṅkura) of which are classifed as ananta-kāya, or “plants that are inhabited by an infinite number of living organisms”, and therefore are abhakṣya (forbidden to consume) according to Nemicandra (in his Pravacana-sāroddhāra v245-246). Those plants which are classifiedas ananta-kāyas (eg., vaṭa) seem to be chosen because of certain morphological peculiarities such as the possession of bulbs or rhizomes orthe habit of periodically shedding their leaves; and in general theyare characterized by possibilities of vegetative reproduction.

Source: archive.org: Jaina Yoga

Vāta (वात) means “air” and refers to a type of strata or cushion supporting the lands (bhumī) of the underworld, according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 3.1. There are seven lands existing in the downward order (one below the other) with Ratnaprabhā being the topmost supported by the cushions of humid atmosphere (ghana), dense air /water (ambu), which rests in a ring of thin /rarified air (vāta) resting in space (ākāśa).

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 3: The Lower and middle worlds
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geogprahy

1) Vāṭa (वाट) is a word denoting a ‘village’ or ‘hamlet’ and can be seen as a synonym for grāma, often used in inscriptions.—Terms such as vāṭa are in many cases, associated with the names of the villages so as to become the ending part of the different place-names. Inscriptions throw light on the location of the villages in different ways. Firstly, they communicate us an idea about the country, the division and the sub-division to which these villages belonged. Secondly, the inscriptions provide information regarding theboundaries of the donated villages.

2) Vaṭa (वट).—The following inscriptions refer to the city called Vaṭa: (1) Vasantgarh inscription of Varmalāta of 625 A.D. (2) Samoli inscription of the time of Śīlāditya, 646 A.D. The city is identical with Vasantagarh in Sirohi district, Rajasthan, six miles from Samoli. It was the capital of a feudatory of king Varmalāta. Kṣemārya temple mentioned in Vasantgarh inscription is the same as the temple o Khamela-mātā at Vasant-garh.

Source: archive.org: Geography in Ancient Indian inscriptions

Vata is another name for Nyagrodha, a tree mentioned in the Kathasaritsagara by Somadeva (10th century A.D).—Nyagrodha refers to the “Banyan-tree” and another name for it is Vata.

Somadeva mentions many rich forests, gardens, various trees (eg., Vata), creepers medicinal and flowering plants and fruit-bearing trees in the Kathasaritsagara. Travel through the thick, high, impregnable and extensive Vindhya forest is a typical feature of many travel-stories. Somadeva’s writing more or less reflects the life of the people of Northern India during the 11th century. His Kathasaritsagara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Vata, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravahanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyadharas (celestial beings).

Source: Shodhganga: Cultural history as g leaned from kathasaritsagara
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

vata : (ind.) surely; certainly; indeed; alas. (nt.), a religious duty or observance. || vaṭa (m.), a banyan tree. vāṭa (m.) an enclosure. vāta (m.) the wind; air.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

1) Vaṭa, at Pug. 45, 46 (tuccho pi hito pūro pi vaṭo) read ti pihito pūro vivaṭo. See vivaṭa. (Page 593)

2) Vaṭa, (cp. Epic Sk. vaṭa. A root vaṭ, not connected with this vaṭa is given at Dhtm 106 in meaning “veṭhana”: see vaṭaṃsa) the Indian fig tree J. I, 259 (°rukkha); III, 325; Mhvs 6, 16; DhA. I, 167 (°rukkha); PvA. 113. (Page 593)

— or —

1) Vata, 2 (m. & nt.) (cp. Vedic vrata vow. fr. vṛt, meaning later “milk” (see Macdonell & Keith, Vedic Index II. 341)) 1. a religious duty, observance, rite, practice, custom S. I, 143, 201; IV, 180; A. IV, 461 (sīla, vata, tapas, brahmacariya); V, 18; Sn. 792, 898; Vv 8424; J. III, 75; VvA. 9; PvA. 60.—subbata of good practice Vv 346. Cp. patibbata, sīlabbata.—2. manner of (behaving like) a certain animal (as a practice of ascetics), e.g. aja° like a goat J. IV, 318; go° like a cow M. I, 387; J. IV, 318; vagguli° bat practice J. I, 493; III, 235; IV, 299; hatthi° elephant behaviour Nd1 92 (here as vatta; see under vatta1).

—pada an item of good practice, virtue (otherwise called guṇa at Miln. 90) J. I, 202 (where 7 are enumd, viz. devotion to one’s mother & father, reverence towards elder people, speaking the truth, gentle speech, open speech, unselfishness); Miln. 90 (where 8 are given in detail, differing from the above). See also vatta1 2. where other sets of 7 & 8 are quoted. —samādāna taking up a (good) practice, observance of a vow J. I, 157. (Page 597)

2) Vata, 1 (indecl.) (Vedic bata, post-Vedic vata) part of exclamation: surely, certainly, indeed, alas! Vin. III, 39 (puris’usabho vat’âyaṃ “for sure he is a human bull”); Th. 2, 316 (abbhutaṃ vata vācaṃ bhāsasi); Sn. 178, 191, 358; Vv 4713; Pv. I, 85; J. IV, 355; PvA. 13, 61, 75, 121. Often combd with other emphatic particles, like aho vata Pv. II, 945 (=sādhu vata PvA. 131); lābhā vata no it is surely a gain that Sn. 31; DhA. II, 95; vata bho J. I, 81. (Page 597)

— or —

Vāṭa, (cp. Class. Sk. vāṭa; on etym. see Walde, Lat. Wtb. s. v. vallus) enclosure, enclosed place Vin. II, 154. See also yañña°. (Page 607)

— or —

Vāta, (Vedic vāta, of vā; cp. Sk. vāti & vāyati to blow, vāyu wind; Lat. ventus, Goth. winds=wind; Ohg. wājan to blow, Oir. feth air; Gr. a)/hmi to blow, a)ήths wind, Lith. áudra storm etc. ) wind. There exists a common distinction of winds into 2 groups: “internal” and “external” winds, or the ajjhattikā vāyo-dhātu (wind category), and the bāhirā. They are discussed at Vbh. 84, quoted at MA 30, 31, and expld in detail at VbhA. 70 sq.; Vism. 350. The bāhirā also at Nd2 562, and in poetical form at S. IV, 218.—The internal winds (see below 2) comprise the foll. : uddhaṅgamā vātā, adhogamā, kucchisayā, koṭṭhāsasayā, aṅgam-aṅg’‹-› ânusārino, satthakā, khurakā, uppalakā, assāso, passāso, i.e. all kinds of winds (air) or drawing pains (rheumatic?) in the body, from hiccup, stitch and stomach-ache up to breathing. Their complement are the external winds (see below 1), viz. puratthimā vātā, pacchimā, uttarā, dakkhiṇā (from the 4 quarters of the sky), sarajā arajā, sītā uṇhā, parittā adhimattā, kāḷā, verambha°, pakkha°, supaṇṇa°, tālavanta°, vidhūpana. ° These are characterized according to direction, dust, temperature, force, height & other causes (like fanning etc.).—1. wind (of the air) S. IV, 218 (vātā ākāse vāyanti); Sn. 71, 348, 591 (vāto tūlaṃ va dhaṃsaye), 622, 1074; J. I, 72; Pug. 32; Vism. 31. adhimatta v. S. IV, 56; mahā° S. II, 88; A. I, 136, 205; II, 199; IV, 312; veramba° (winds blowing in high regions: upari ākāse S. II, 231) A. I, 137; Th. 1, 598; J. VI, 326.—2. “winds” of the body, i.e. pains caused by (bad) circulation, sometimes simply (uncontrolled) movements in the body, sometimes rheumatic pains, or sharp & dragging pains in var. parts of the body Nett. 74. Also applied to certain humours, supposed to be caused by derangements of the “winds” of the body (cp. Gr. qumόs; or E. slang “get the wind up”), whereas normal “winds” condition normal health: Pv. II, 61 (tassa vātā balīyanti: bad winds become strong, i.e. he is losing his senses, cp. PvA. 94: ummāda-vātā).—aṅga° pain in the limbs (or joints), rheumatism Vin. I, 205; udara° belly ache J. I, 393, 433; DhA. IV, 129; kammaja° birth-pains Vism. 500; kucchi° pains in the abdomen (stomach) VbhA. 5; piṭṭhi° pains in the back ibid.—3. (fig.) atmosphere, condition, state; or as pp. (of vāyati) scented (with), full of, pervaded (by), at Vin. I, 39 (vijana° pervaded by loneliness, having an atmosphere of loneliness; Kern. Toev. s. v. vāta wrongly “troop, crowd. ” The same passage occurs at D. III, 38, where Rh. D. Dial. III, 35, trsls “where the breezes from the pastures blow”; with expln vijana= vṛjana (see vajati), hardly justified. In same connection at A. IV, 88); Miln. 19 (isi°-parivāta scented with an atmosphere of Sages; Rh. D. differently: “bringing down the breezes from the heights where the Sages dwell”; forced).—On vāta in similes see J. P. T. S. 1907, 135.

—ātapa (Dvandva) wind and heat. In this phrase Bdhgh. takes vāta as wind (above 1) at Vism. 31 (saraja & araja v.), but as (bodily) pain (above 2) at VbhA. 5. See D. III, 353; S. II, 88; III, 54; V, 379; A. I, 204; II, 117, 143, 199; III, 394 sq. 404; V, 15, 127; Sn. 52; J. I, 93; Miln. 259, 314, 416; DhA. III, 112. —ābādha “wind disease, ” internal pains (not rheumatism) Vin. I, 205; Miln. 134; Vism. 41. —āyana air hole, window Mhvs 5, 37; Dāva V, 57. —āhata struck by the wind Vism. 63; DhA. III, 328. —erita moved by the wind (of trees) S. V, 123; A. III, 232; VvA. 175. —kkhandha “wind bulk, ” mass of wind, region of the wind J. VI, 326. —ghāta (“wind-struck”) the tree Cassia (or Cathartocarpus) fistula, a syn. of uddāla(ka) J. IV, 298; VvA. 197; also as °ka at J. V, 199, 407; VvA. 43. —java swiftness of the wind J. VI, 274. —dhuta shaken by the wind, swaying in the w. Vv 385, cp. VvA. 174. —passa the wind side DhA. II, 17. —pāna lattice, window Vin. I, 209; II, 148, 211; A. I, 101, 137; IV, 231; J. II, 325; V, 214; VI, 349 (read vātapān° for dvārapān°); KhA 54; DhA. I, 211, 370; VvA. 67; PvA. 4, 216, 279. —bhakkha living on air DhA. II, 57. —maṇḍala a whirlwind, gust of wind, storm, tornado (cp. BSk. vāyu-maṇḍala at AvŚ I. 256 with note) J. I, 72; SnA 224. —maṇḍalikā id. Vin. II, 113; IV, 345; J. IV, 430. —yoga direction of the wind J. II, 11. —roga “wind disease, ” upset of the body, disturbance of the intestines, colic SnA 69; VvA. 185. —vassā (pl.) wind and rain PvA. 55. —vuṭṭhi id. SnA 34. —vega force of the wind Sn. 1074; PvA. 47. —sakuṇa a certain kind of bird (“wind-bird”) Nd1 87, where KhA 118 reads bhāsa°. (Page 607)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

vaṭa (वट).—m S vaṭaka m S Indian fig tree, Ficus Indica. Some of the common trees are thus grouped by the poet;--vaṭa pimpaḷa audumbara || kapittha bilva añjīra || pārijātaka dēvadāra || arjuna campaka kadamba tē ||.

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vaṭa (वट).—f Loss or waste in washing raw silk.

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vata (वत).—m (Better ūta q. v.) Boiling over &c.

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vāṭa (वाट).—m A weight to weigh with. It ranges as far as five sher.

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vāṭa (वाट).—f ē (S) A road, path, way. 2 fig. Course, procedure, manner or mode of progress. 3 Hardness about the navel; supposed to be formed by the meeting there of the two vital airs prāṇa & apāna, but, in simple style, Relaxed state of the bowels with flatulence. cāra vāṭā karaṇēṃ g. of o. To scatter, disperse, dissipate, squander. cāra vāṭā or cārahī vāṭā or bārā vāṭā mōkaḷyā in. con. To have the wide world open before one. tivāṭāñcī mātī yēta nāhīṃ or samajata nāhīṃ (hyālā &c.) He &c. is an ignoramus. dēkhalī vāṭa pāhaṇēṃ or karaṇēṃ To return by the way one came. madhalyā vāṭēsa By the middle road; between the two; i. e. without obtaining either of the advantages or objects proposed. v yē, jā, nē, āṇa. vāṭa karaṇēṃ To open a way, lit. fig.: also to clear the way of; to arrange, adjust, or despatch. Ex. mājhī vāṭa kēlī kōṇa || tyāja kāraṇēṃ pusāvēṃ ||. Also to clear off, get rid of, dispose of (any troublesome matter or person). vāṅkaḍī vāṭa karaṇēṃ To take a round; to fetch a compass. vāṭa ghaḍaṇēṃ To open up or come about--a way. Ex. advaitaśāstra nāvaḍē hyāsī || puḍhēṃ vāṭa ghaḍēla kaisī ||. vāṭa dharaṇēṃ To set one's self upon the way of (esp. to stop or obstruct). Ex. ēvaḍhyā rānāmadhyēṃ jāṇa || vāṭa dharūna baisasī kōṇa ||. 2 unc To expect or await. vāṭa pāhaṇēṃ g. of o. To expect, await, look out for. vāṭa māraṇēṃ To waylay and rob. vāṭa lāgaṇēṃ g. of s. To be disposed of; i. e. to be consumed, devoured, expended. Also vāṭa lāvaṇēṃ g. of o. To dispose of. vāṭa vāvaraṇēṃ To make a fruitless trip. vāṭa vāhaṇēṃ To flow, i. e. to swarm with passengers--a road or way. Ex. tukā vhaṇē vāhē vāṭa || vaikuṇṭhīñcī ghaḍaghaḍāṭa ||. vāṭēcā pāya or vāṭēcēṃ pāūla āḍa vāṭēsa paḍaṇēṃ Used of the slipping or tripping of a good man. vāṭēṃ or vāṭēsa lāvaṇēṃ To put on the road; to send away. vāṭēvara paḍaṇēṃ (To lie on the road.) To be open, accessible, obtainable &c. easily or to everybody. Esp. with neg. con. vāṭēvara yēṇēṃ To get into the right way; to come right. vēgaḷyā vāṭēnēṃ In an off or a by way; aside, apart, in private: also in another way; after another manner or fashion.

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vāta (वात).—f (vartti S) A wick (of a lamp). 2 Applied fig. to very young and thin paḍavaḷa (snake-gourd), to the pods of śēgavā &c. 3 fig. A sail furled on its yard. 4 The furrow or channel (of a brass lampstand) which receives the wick. 5 Abridged from tēlavāta. Land appropriated to the maintenance of the light in a temple.

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vāta (वात).—m (S) Wind or air. 2 Air as one of the three humors of the body. 3 Rheumatic affection, cramp, gout: also spasmodic affection, spasm. v .

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vātā (वाता).—m (Better vāthā) A tenon (of a door or of a window-shutter).

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vaṭa (वट) [-vaṭaka, -वटक].—m Indian fig-tree, Ficus Indica.

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vāṭa (वाट).—f A road; course. Hardness about the navel. cāra vāṭā karaṇēṃ Scatter, disperse. cārahī vāṭā or bārā vāṭā mōkaḷyā Have the wide world open before one. vāṭa karaṇēṃ Open a way; clear the way of. Arrange. vāṭa dharaṇēṃ Set one's self upon the way of (esp. to stop or obstruct). vāṭa pāhaṇēṃ Expect, await. vāṭa lāgaṇēṃ Be consumed, expended. vāṭa lāgaṇēṃ Dispose of. vāṭa pāhāṇēṃ Swarm with passengers- a road. vāṭēcēṃ pāūla āḍavāṭēsa paḍaṇēṃ Used of the slipping or tripping of a good man. vāṭēvara paḍaṇēṃ Be open, accessible, obtainable, &c., easily or to every- body. vā़ṭēvara yēṇēṃ Get into the right way. vāṭēsa lāvaṇēṃ Put on the road; send away. way.

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vāṭā (वाटा).—m A share, portion, division. vāṇṭā ucalaṇēṃ (puṇyācā-yaśācā, &c.) Take part in; have a hand in.

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vāta (वात).—f A wick. m Wind. Gout.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vaṭa (वट).—[vaṭ-ac Uṇ.4.116] The fig-tree; अयं च चित्रकूटयायिनि वर्त्मनि वटः श्यामो नाम (ayaṃ ca citrakūṭayāyini vartmani vaṭaḥ śyāmo nāma) U.1; R.13.53.

2) A small shell or cowrie.

3) A small ball, globule, pill.

4) A round figure, a cipher.

5) A kind of cake; पयःस्मिता मण्डकमण्डनाम्बरा वटाननेन्दुः पृथुलड्डु स्तनी (payaḥsmitā maṇḍakamaṇḍanāmbarā vaṭānanenduḥ pṛthulaḍḍu stanī) N.16.17.

6) A string, rope; (n. also in this sense).

7) Equality in shape.

8) A sort of bird, flying fox ? (Mar. vaṭavāghuḷa); कङ्कगृध्रवटश्येनभासभल्लकबर्हिणः (kaṅkagṛdhravaṭaśyenabhāsabhallakabarhiṇaḥ) Bhāg.3.1.24.

9) A pawn (in chess).

1) Sulphur.

Derivable forms: vaṭaḥ (वटः).

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Vata (वत).—See बत (bata).

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Vata (वत).—a.

1) Sounded, spoken, uttered.

2) Asked, begged.

3) Hurt, killed.

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Vata (वत).—p. p.

1) Uttered, sounded.

2) Killed, hurt.

3) Asked, begged.

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Vāṭa (वाट).—a. Made or consisting of the वट (vaṭa) (Indian fig-tree) or its wood; क्षत्रियो वाटखादिरौ (kṣatriyo vāṭakhādirau) ... दण्डानर्हन्ति धर्मतः (daṇḍānarhanti dharmataḥ) Ms.2.45.

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Vāṭa (वाट).—[vaṭ-ghañ]

1) An enclosure, a piece of enclosed ground, court; स्ववाटकुक्कुटविजयहृष्टः (svavāṭakukkuṭavijayahṛṣṭaḥ) Dk.; नीत्वा स्ववाटं कृतवत्यथोदयम् (nītvā svavāṭaṃ kṛtavatyathodayam) Bhāg.1.11.2; विवेश (viveśa) ...... मेघवाटम् (meghavāṭam) Bhag. so वेश°, श्मशान° (veśa°, śmaśāna°) &c.

2) A garden, park, an orchard; Bhāg.5.5.3.

3) A road.

4) The groin.

5) A sort of grain.

6) A district.

Derivable forms: vāṭaḥ (वाटः), vāṭam (वाटम्).

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Vāta (वात).—p. p. [vā-kta]

1) Blown.

2) Desired or wished for, solicited.

-taḥ 1 Air, wind.

2) The god of wind, the deity presiding over wind.

3) Wind, as one of the three humours of the body.

4) Gout, rheumatism.

5) Inflammation of the joints.

6) A faithless lover (dhṛṣṭa).

7) Wind emitted from the body; Mb.

8) Morbid affection of the windy humour, flatulence.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vaṭa (वट).—(-vaṭa), usually banyan, is sometimes applied to the bodhi-tree (see s.v. bodhi 2): bodhi-vaṭa LV 308.4; 364.8, etc.; bodhi-su-vaṭa LV 360.18; all verses.

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Vāta (वात).—nt. (otherwise m.), wind: vātāni Mv i.7.8 (prose).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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