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Saumyā, aka: Saumya; 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Saumyā means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. Check out some of the following descriptions and leave a comment if you want to add your own contribution to this article.

The Sanskrit term Saumyā can be transliterated into English as Saumya, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purāṇa

Saumya (सौम्य).—One of the nine divisions of Bhārata, a region south of mount Meru, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 74. Saumya is surrounded by an ocean (sāgara) and is one thousand yojanas in extent. Meru is one of the seven mountains located in Jambūdvīpa, which is ruled over by Āgnīdhra, a grandson of Svāyambhuva Manu, who was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being, who was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being.

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Saumyā (सौम्या) is the name of a mind-born ‘divine mother’ (mātṛ), created for the purpose of drinking the blood of the Andhaka demons, according to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.8. The Andhaka demons spawned out of every drop of blood spilled from the original Andhakāsura (Andhaka-demon). According to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.35, “Most terrible they (eg., Saumyā) all drank the blood of those Andhakas and become exceedingly satiated.”

The Matsyapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 20,000 metrical verses, dating from the 1st-millennium BCE. The narrator is Matsya, one of the ten major avatars of Viṣṇu.

Source: Wisdom Library: The Matsya-purāṇa

1a) Saumya (सौम्य).—The town of Soma visited by Arjuna in search of the dead child of the Dvārakā Brahman.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa X. 89. 44.

1b) One of the nine divisions of Bhāratavarṣa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 16. 9; Matsya-purāṇa 114. 8; Vāyu-purāṇa 45. 79; Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 3. 7.

1c) A muhūrta of the night.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 3. 43; Vāyu-purāṇa 66. 44.

1d) A son of Purindrasena (Āndhra).*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 273. 10.

1e) Budha, the son of Rohiṇī; born in Naimiṣa.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 2. 9.

1f) (Sauram Ucānam)—solar measurements.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 21. 137; Vāyu-purāṇa 50. 188.

1g) Sūkta of the Yajurvedins; to be recited in tank rituals.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 58. 35; 93. 132.

1h) A sāma.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 9. 48.

1i) The place of the moon in the maṇḍalam.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 53. 59.

1j) A class of sacred fire.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IV. 1. 63.

1k) A class of Pitṛs who drink Soma's svadha; deities of Ṛtus and hence Ṛtvas; Pitṛs born of Soma.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 23. 39, 75; 28. 4, 15, 18, 70; Matsya-purāṇa 102. 20; 126. 69; 141. 4, 13, 16. Vāyu-purāṇa 52. 67; 56. 13, 16, 66; Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 12. 13.

2) Saumyā (सौम्या).—A mind-born mother.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 179. 10.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

about this context:

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Āyurveda (science of life)

1) Saumyā (सौम्या) is another name for Guñjā, which is a Sanskrit word referring to Abrus precatorius (Indian liquorice). It is classified as a medicinal plant in the system of Āyurveda (science of Indian medicine) and is used throughout literature such as the Suśrutasaṃhita and the Carakasaṃhitā. The synonym was identified in the Rājanighaṇṭu (verses 3.112-114), which is a  13th-century medicinal thesaurus.

2) Saumyā (सौम्या) is another name (synonym) for Śaṭī, which is a Sanskrit name for the plant Hedychium spicatum (spiked ginger lily). This synonym was identified by Narahari in his 13th-century Rājanighaṇṭu (verses 6.226-227), which is an Āyurvedic medicinal thesaurus.

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

about this context:

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Hindu science dealing with subjects such as health, medicine, anatomy, etc. and has been in use throughout India since ancient times.

Śaivism (Śaiva philosophy)

1) Saumyā (सौम्या):—One of the twelve guṇas associated with Dhvaja, the fourth seat of the Svādhiṣṭhāna-chakra. According to tantric sources such as the Śrīmatottara-tantra and the Gorakṣasaṃhitā (Kādiprakaraṇa), these twelve guṇas are represented as female deities. According to the Ṣaṭsāhasrasaṃhitā however, they are explained as particular syllables. They (eg. Saumyā) only seem to play an minor role with regard to the interpretation of the Devīcakra (first of five chakras, as taught in the Kubjikāmata-tantra).

2) Saumyā (सौम्या):—One of the sixteen yoginīs representing the sixteen petals of the Dūtīcakra. The sixteen petals comprise the outer furnishment, whereupon the abode of the Dūtīs is situated. The Dūtīs refer to the eighty-one “female messengers/deties” of the Dūtīcakra.

3) Saumyā (सौम्या):—Sanskrit name of one of the twenty-four goddesses of the Sūryamaṇḍala (first maṇḍala of the Khecarīcakra) according to the kubjikāmata-tantra. The Khecarīcakra is the fifth cakra (‘internal mystic center’) of the five (pañcacakra) and is located on or above the head. She presides over the pītha (‘sacred site’) called Aṭṭahāsa. She is also known as Saumyāsyā (according to Kubjikāmata-tantra) or Kadambā (according to Śrīmatottara-tantra).

4) Saumyā (सौम्या):—Sanskrit name of one of the thirty-two female deities of the Somamaṇḍala (second maṇḍala of the Khecarīcakra) according to the kubjikāmata-tantra. These goddesses are situated on a ring of sixteen petals and represent the thirty-two syllables of the Aghoramantra. Each deity (including Saumyā) is small, plump and large-bellied. They can assume any form at will, have sixteen arms each, and are all mounted on a different animal.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

about this context:

Śaiva (शैव, shaiva) or Śaivism (shaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Śiva as the supreme being. Closeley related to Śāktism, Śaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Nāṭyaśāstra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Saumya (सौम्य, “pleasing one”) refers to a specific “mode of address” (nāman) used in drama (nāṭya), according to Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 19. Saumya is used to address inferior persons. A similair address to be used in this situation would be Bhadramukha.

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

One of the Twenty-four Heads. Saumya: motionless. Usage: when the dance (nṛtya) is to be begun.

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)

about this context:

Nāṭyaśāstra (नाट्यशास्त्र, natya-shastra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition of performing arts, (e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nāṭya) and poetic works (kāvya).

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