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Hasta, 8 Definition(s)

Introduction

Hasta means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. Check out some of the following descriptions and leave a comment if you want to add your own contribution to this article.

In Hinduism

Yoga (school of philosophy)

Hasta (हस्त) is a Sanskrit word referring to the “hand”. It is one of the fourteen Adhyātma (pertaining to the body) mentioned in the Subālopaniṣad (fifth section). The corresponding Ādhibhūta (pertaining to the elements) is called ādātavya (that which can be handled) and the corresponding Adhidaivata (presiding deity) is indra. Accordingly, “the nādis form their bond (or connect them). He who moves in the hand (hasta), in ādātavya, in indra, in the nādis, in prāṇa, in vijñāna, in ānanda, in the ākāśa of the heart and within all else—That is Ātman. It is that which should be worshipped. It is without old age, death, fear, sorrow or end.”

Source: Wisdom Library: Yoga

about this context:

Yoga refers to the Ancient Indian school of philosophy combining the physical, mental and spiritual.

Purāṇa

Hasta (हस्त): A unit of measurement of distance, according to the Vāyu Purāṇa (वायु पुराण). The following table gives some idea about their relations to each other:

8 Aṅgulas = Prādeśa (?);
21 Aṅgulas = Ratni;
24 Aṅgulas = Hasta;
2000 Dhanus = Gavyūti;
12 Aṅgulas = Vitasti;
2 Ratnis or 42 Aṅgulas = Kiṣku;
4 hastas = Dhanus;
8000 Dhanus = Yojana.
Source: Google Books: Cultural History from the Vāyu Purāna

1a) Hasta (हस्त).—A son of Rocana and Vasudeva.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa IX. 24. 49.

1b) A son of Sāvarṇa Manu I.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 1. 64.

1c) A measurement of 24 angulas.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 8. 102, 105; 101. 123.

1d) A son of Haryaśva and father of Sumanas.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 3. 19-20.

1e) A constellation;1 śrāddham that day makes one important in an assembly.2

  • 1) Vāyu-purāṇa 66. 49; 82. 7.
  • 2) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 18. 7.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

about this context:

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Nāṭyaśāstra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Hasta (हस्त) is a Sanskrit technical term referring to “hands”. It is one of the six major limbs (aṅga) used in dramatic performance, according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. With these limbs are made the various gestures (āṅgika), which form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya).

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

The Classification of Hands (hasta-bheda).—The characteristics of the Hands will be set forth in order. There are two kinds,

  1. the Single (asamyutta)
  2. and the combined (samyutta).

There are twenty-eight Single Hands as follows:

  1. Patāka,
  2. Tripatāka,
  3. Ardha-patāka,
  4. Kartarī-mukha,
  5. Mayura,
  6. Ardha-candra,
  7. Arāla,
  8. Śuka-tuṇḍaka,
  9. Muṣṭi,
  10. Śikhara,
  11. Kapittha,
  12. Kaṭaka-mukha,
  13. Sūci,
  14. Candra-kalā,
  15. (Padma-) Kośa,
  16. Sarpa-śīrṣa,
  17. Mṛga-śīrṣa,
  18. Siṃha-mukha,
  19. Lāṅgula,
  20. Sola-padma,
  21. Catura,
  22. Bhramara,
  23. Haṃsāsya,
  24. Haṃsa-pakṣa,
  25. Saṃdaṃsa,
  26. Mukula,
  27. Tāmracūḍa,
  28. Triśūla.

Thus the Twenty-eight Hands are set forth. But it is said that there are as many hands as meanings.

According to another text (three others are mentioned, as follows):

  1. Urṇa-nābha (spider),
  2. Bāṇa (arrow)
  3. and Ardha-sūcika (half-needle).
Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)

about this context:

Nāṭyaśāstra (नाट्यशास्त्र, natya-shastra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition of performing arts, (e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nāṭya) and poetic works (kāvya).

General definition (in Hinduism)

Hasta; ancient Hindu unit of measurement of distance. 24 Aṅgulas make 1 Hasta, and 4 Hastas make up for a single Dhanu.

If we consider a single Yojana to be 8 miles (~12.87km), one Hasta would correspond to roughly 1.32 feet (~40.23cm)

If we consider a single Yojana to be 5 miles (~8.04km), one Hasta would correspond to roughly 9.9 inches (~25.15cm)

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Hasta (हस्त, ‘hand’) is made up of the five conspicuous stars (δ, γ, ε, α, β) in Corvus, a number which the word itself suggests. According to Geldner, the ‘five bulls of the Rigveda are this constellation.

Source: archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

The hasta is a traditional Indian unit of length, measured from the elbow to the tip of the middle finger. It equals 24 aṅgulas orᅠ about 18 inches, about 45 centimetres.

400 hastas make one nalva.

Etymology: The hasta (Sanskrit: हस्त (hasta); Chinese: 肘 (pinyin: zhǒu))

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Relevant definitions

Search found 151 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Karihasta
Karihasta (करिहस्त).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made with dance-hands (nṛttahasta);&md...
Hastihasta
Hastihasta (हस्तिहस्त) corresponds to the “balustrades” provided for the sopānas...
Kaṭakahasta
Kaṭakahasta (कटकहस्त) or Siṃhakarṇa is that pose of the hand wherein the tips of the fingers...
Nṛttahasta
Dance-hands (nṛttahasta) are also to be used. As their name implies these hands were exclusi...
Hasta-nakṣatra
Hasta-nakṣatra (हस्त-नक्षत्र):—Name for a particular section of the ecliptic. Nakṣatra...
Hasta-prāṇa
Lives of the Hands (hasta-prāṇa).—The Lives (i.e. movements) of the Hands are twelve, ...
Ūrdhvahastāsana
Ūrdhvahastāsana (ऊर्ध्वहस्तासन, “upward hand posture”) is a Sanskrit word referr...
Hastarecaka
Hastarecaka (हस्तरेचक, “movement of the hand”) is a Sanskrit technical term refe...
Baddhahastaśīrṣāsana
Baddhahastaśīrṣāsana (बद्धहस्तशीर्षासन, “bound hand-head posture”) is a Sanskrit...
Pādahastāsana
Pādahastāsana (पादहस्तासन, “foot-hand posture”) is a Sanskrit word referring to ...
Muktahastaśīrṣāsana
Muktahastaśīrṣāsana (मुक्तहस्तशीर्षासन, “freed hand-head posture”) is a Sanskrit...
Varadahasta
The Varadahasta (वरदहस्त)  shows the pose of the hand while conferring a boon. In this ...
Abhayahasta
Abhayahasta (अभयहस्त) means the protection-affording hand-pose. Here the palm of the hand, w...
Sūcīhasta
Sūcīhasta (सूचीहस्त) has been misunderstood by some Sanskrit scholars to mean the hand that ...
Kaṭyavalambitahasta
Kaṭyavalambitahasta (कट्यवलम्बितहस्त).—In this the arm is let down so as to hang by th...

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Search found 77 books containing Hasta. You can also click to the full overview containing English textual excerpts. Below are direct links for the 20 most relevant articles:

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