Svayambhu, aka: Svayambhū, Svayam-bhu; 14 Definition(s)

Introduction

Svayambhu means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Svayambhu in Shaivism glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Svayambhū (स्वयम्भू) is the Sanskrit name of a deity presiding over Nagareśvara, one of the sixty-eight places hosting a svāyambhuvaliṅga, which is one of the most sacred of liṅgas according to the Śaivāgamas. The list of sixty-eight svāyambhuvaliṅgas and presiding deities (eg., Svayambhū) is found in the commentary on the Jirṇoddhāra-daśaka by Nigamajñānadeva. The word liṅga refers to a symbol used in the worship of Śiva and is used thoughout Śaiva literature, such as the sacred Āgamas.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism
Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana

Svayambhu in Purana glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Svayambhū (स्वयम्भू).—A teacher—priest. This teacher was the first one who had given precedence to the ceremonial rites of Śrāddha (offering to the manes). (Mahābhārata Anuśāsana Parva, Chapter 191).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Svayambhū (स्वयम्भू).—The one god in three forms: creating, protecting and destroying: only sectarians speak of each of these as separate: the one of the three guṇas;1 not created and the first.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 3. 82-131.
  • 2) Vāyu-purāṇa 4. 44.

1b) The Vedavyāsa of the first dvāpara.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa III. 3. 11.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Svayambhu in Ayurveda glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

1) Svayambhū (स्वयम्भू) is another name for Māṣaparṇī, a medicinal plant identified with Teramnus labialis from the Fabaceae, or “pea family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.30-33 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh). Together with the names Svayambhū and Māṣaparṇī, there are a total of twenty-one Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

2) Svayambhū (स्वयम्भू) is also mentioned as a synonym for Liṅginī, an unidentified medicinal plant, according to verse 3.45-47.

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu
Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Svayambhu in Hinduism glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Svayambhu (स्वयम्भु)—A holy place on the bank of the Yamunā which Śrī Caitanya Mahāprabhu visited. (Śrī Caitanya Caritāmṛta, Madhya–17.191)

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Svayambhū (स्वयम्भू).—The Śaivite Nepālamāhātmya, contains a section about pilgrimage to Svayambhū, and makes the following observation, “Monks live there who have left their descendents and relatives and enjoy ther bliss of knowledge (jñānānanda), and who are dedicated only to beholding the Buddha.”

Source: Google Books: Tantric Traditions in Transmission and Translation

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Svayambhu in Jainism glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Svayambhū (स्वयम्भू) is the name of the fourth Vāsudeva (“violent heroes”) according to both Śvetāmbara and Digambara sources. Since they enjoy half the power of a Cakravartin (universal monarch) they are also known as Ardhacakrins. Jain legends describe nine such Vāsudevas usually appearing together with their “gentler” twins known as the Baladevas. The legends of these twin-heroes usually involve their antagonistic counterpart known as the Prativāsudevas (anti-heroes).

The parents of as Svayambhū are known as king Soma and queen Pṛthvī whose stories are related in texts such as the Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacarita (“the lives of the sixty-three illustrious persons”), a twelfth-century Śvetāmbara work by Hemacandra.

The nine Vāsudevas (such as Svayambhū) are also known as Nārāyaṇas or Viṣṇus and are further described in various Jain sources, such as the Bhagavatīsūtra and Jambūdvīpaprajñapti in Śvetāmbara, or the Tiloyapaṇṇatti and Ādipurāṇa in the Digambara tradition. The appearance of a Vāsudeva is described as follows: their body is of a dark-blue complexion, they wear a yellow robe made of silk, and they bear the śrīvatsa on their chest.

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Svayambhū (8th century A.D.) or Svayambhūdeva is the author of the Paümacariu.—The oldest extant Jaina Purāṇa in Apabhramsa (Apabhraṃśa), the Paümacariu of Svayambhū, is also a telling of the Rāma story. Unlike most Jaina authors, Svayambhū was a householder, not a mendicant. He lived sometime between the early eighth and early ninth centuries C.E., probably in Karnataka.

Source: Google Books: Purana Perennis (jainism)

Svayambhu (स्वयम्भु) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Svayambhu] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

Source: archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geogprahy

Svayambhū (स्वयम्भू) is the name of a sacred spot mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa.—Svayambhū is the modern Suyam in Machipur Pargana.

Source: archive.org: Nilamata Purana: a cultural and literary study (history)

Svayambhū is one of the Brāhmaṇa donees mentioned in the “Asankhali plates of Narasiṃha II” (1302 A.D.). When a grant was made to a large number of Brāhmaṇas, the chief amongst the donees seems to have been called Pānīyagrāhin especially. In the present record, though all the donees (eg., Svayambhū) are referred to as Pāṇigrāhi-mahājana, their list is headed by a Brāhmaṇa with Pāṇigrahī as his surname.

These copper plates (mentioning Svayambhū) were discovered from the house of a Santal inhabitant of Pargana Asankhali in the Mayurbhanj State (Orissa). It was made when king Vīra-Narasiṃhadeva was staying at the Bhairavapura-kaṭaka (city, camp or residence).

Source: What is India: Epigraphia Indica volume XXXI (1955-56)
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Svayambhu in Marathi glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

svayambhū (स्वयंभू).—m (S The self-existent.) corruptly svayambha m A name of Brahma; also of Vishn̤u, Shiva, time, love, a mountain &c. 2 as a Self-existent.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

svayambhū (स्वयंभू).—a Self-existent.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Relevant definitions

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