Harshana, Harṣaṇa: 13 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Harshana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Harṣaṇa can be transliterated into English as Harsana or Harshana, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstra

Harṣaṇa (हर्षण) refers to a type of temple (prāsāda) classified, according to Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra chapter 57. The temple is mentioned as one of the twenty temples being a favorite of Viṣṇu. The Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra is an 11th-century encyclopedia dealing with various topics from the Vāstuśāstra.

Harṣaṇa is found in another list in the Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra, chapter 60, where it is mentioned in a list of thirty-six Prāsādas (temples) having activities of the townsmen entailing Sādhārās.

Vastushastra book cover
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Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Harshana in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Harṣaṇa (हर्षण, “delighting”) refers to one of the five arrows of Kāma, also known as Puṣpabāṇa, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.3.—“[...] In this form and with your five flower-arrows [viz., Puṣpabāṇa] you can enamour and captivate men and women and carry on the eternal task of creation. [...] The minds of all living beings will become an easy target of your five-flower arrows (Puṣpabāṇa). You will be the cause of their elation. Thus I have assigned you the task of facilitating creation. These sons of mine will confer names and titles on you. Taking his five flower-arrows (Puṣpabāṇa), Kāma decided on his future course remaining invisible in form. His five arrows are respectively: Harṣaṇa (delighting), Rocana (appealing), Mohana (deluding), Śoṣaṇa (withering), Māraṇa (killing). Even sages could be deluded and tormented by them”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

1) Harṣaṇa (हर्षण):—Sense of friction

2) [harṣaṇam] Causing pleasure

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

Harṣaṇa (हर्षण) is a Sanskrit word translating to “bristling”, “erection”, “excitement” etc. It is derived from the root hṛṣ, referring to “to be excited” or “to become erect”.

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

harṣaṇa (हर्षण).—n S Rejoicing, delighting, making glad. 2 m The fourteenth of the astronomical Yogas. 5 n m A morbid affection of the eyes.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Harṣaṇa (हर्षण).—a. (-ṇā or -ṇī f.) [हृष्-णिच् ल्यु (hṛṣ-ṇic lyu)]

1) Causing delight, gladdening, delightful, pleasant.

2) Causing the hair of the body to stand erect; संवादमिममश्रौषमद्भुतं रोमहर्षणम् (saṃvādamimamaśrauṣamadbhutaṃ romaharṣaṇam) Bg.18.74.

-ṇaḥ 1 Name of one of the five arrows of Kāmadeva.

2) A morbid affection of the eyes.

3) A deity presiding over the funeral ceremonies.

4) A funeral and other rites; L. D. B.

5) One of the 27 yogas (Astr.); L. D. B.

-ṇam 1 Joy, delight, happiness, gladdening, delighting; दुर्हृदामप्रहर्षाय सुहृदां हर्षणाय च (durhṛdāmapraharṣāya suhṛdāṃ harṣaṇāya ca) Mb.

2) Raising the spirit (of an army); खातकव्यूहतत्त्वज्ञं बल- हर्षणकोविदम् (khātakavyūhatattvajñaṃ bala- harṣaṇakovidam) Mb.12.118.11.

3) Erection of the sexual organ, sexual excitement.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Harṣaṇa (हर्षण).—mfn.

(-ṇaḥ-ṇā or -ṇī-ṇaṃ) Causing delight, delighting, delightful, pleasurable, pleasant, &c. m.

(-ṇaḥ) 1. A cause of pleasure, any thing which confers pleasure. 2. The fourteenth of the astronomical Yogas. 3. A morbid affection of the eyes. 4. A deity presiding over Srad'dhas. 5. A kind of Srad'dha. 6. An epithet of one of the five arrows of Kamadeva. n.

(-ṇaṃ) 1. Pleasing, making happy. 2. Rejoicing, being happy. E. hṛṃṣ to be pleased, aff. lyuṭ or yuc .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Harṣaṇa (हर्षण).—i. e. hṛṣ + ana, I. adj. Delighting. Ii. m. 1. A cause of pleasure. 2. A morbid affection of the eyes. Iii. n. Rejoicing.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Harṣaṇa (हर्षण).—[adjective] & [neuter] gladdening, exciting.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Harṣaṇa (हर्षण):—[from harṣa] mfn. causing the hair of the body to stand erect, thrilling with joy or desire, gladdening, delightful, pleasant, [Mahābhārata; Harivaṃśa] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] m. ‘gladdener’, Name of one of the five arrows of Kāma-deva, [Buddha-carita]

3) [v.s. ...] of a man, [Viṣṇu-purāṇa] ([cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] also, ‘a [particular] disease of the eyes’; ‘a [particular] Śrāddha’; ‘a deity presiding over Śrāddhas’; ‘the 14th of the [astronomy] Yogas.’)

4) [v.s. ...] n. bristling, erection, [Suśruta]

5) [v.s. ...] erection of the sexual organ, sexual excitement, [ib.]

6) [v.s. ...] the act of delighting, delight, joy, happiness, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa]

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Harṣaṇa (हर्षण):—(von harṣ simpl. und caus.)

1) adj. a) erfreuend [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha 3, 234.] [Medinīkoṣa ṇ. 88. fg.] kravyādaṃ [Mahābhārata 7, 1447.] [Harivaṃśa 8397. 8966. 11227.] [Spr. (II) 3626, v. l.] [Kathāsaritsāgara 103, 3.] dṛṣṭi [Gītagovinda 9, 11.] — b) erregend [Suśruta 1, 230, 11.] kāma [Rāmāyaṇa 2, 94, 11.] — c) schaudern machend: amlo harṣaṇo romadantānām [VĀGBH. 1, 10, 3.] —

2) m. a) eine best. Augenkrankheit [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] [Medinīkoṣa] — b) = śrāddhadeva diess. und [Śabdaratnāvalī im Śabdakalpadruma] ein best. Śrāddha [Śabdaratnāvalī] — c) Bez. eines best. astr. Yoga [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] [Medinīkoṣa] [Śabdaratnāvalī] des 14ten im Viṣkambhādi [Śabdakalpadruma] nach [KOṢṬHĪPRADĪPA.] —

3) n. a) das Ermuntern, Erfreuen; Freude [Dharaṇīkoṣa im Śabdakalpadruma] durhṛdāmapraharṣāya suhṛdāṃ harṣaṇāya ca [Mahābhārata 7, 6276. 12, 2100.] jagato harṣaṇaṃ bhavet [13225.] [Rāmāyaṇa 1, 49, 9.] bala [Mahābhārata 12, 4313.] — b) geschlechtliche Erregung [Suśruta 1, 258, 21.] — c) das Steifwerden [Suśruta 2, 313, 20. v. l.] gharṣaṇa . — Vgl. danta, rāja, roma, loma, śepa .

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Harshana in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Harṣānā (हर्षाना):—(v) to be full of joy, to be delighted.

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