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Jnana, aka: Jñāna; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Jnana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. Check out some of the following descriptions and leave a comment if you want to add your own contribution to this article.

In Hinduism

Śaivism (Śaiva philosophy)

Jñāna (ज्ञान) is a Sanskrit technical term referring to “realization through understanding”.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism

about this context:

Śaiva (शैव, shaiva) or Śaivism (shaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Śiva as the supreme being. Closeley related to Śāktism, Śaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Purāṇa

Jñāna (ज्ञान).—Nature and value of;1 superior to sannyāsa;2 two-fold;2 freedom from desire and enmity; leads to renunciation or tyāga; leads to yoga;3 fourteen-fold; the eleven of guṇaśarīra and buddhi, citta, and ahaṅkāra; does not see separately; knows himself; there is, or there is not.4 difficulties to attain;5 the path of.6

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa XI. 19. 1-27.
  • 2) Vāyu-purāṇa 91. 114-15.
  • 3) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 3. 40, 55; 5. 27.
  • 4) Vāyu-purāṇa 102. 61, 75, 107, 123. Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 22. 46-9. II. 12. 43-4.
  • 5) Vāyu-purāṇa 58. 21; 59. 54.
  • 6) Ib. 104. 15.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

about this context:

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Nāṭyaśāstra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Jñāna is one of the saṃyutta-hastāni (Twenty-seven combined Hands).

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)

about this context:

Nāṭyaśāstra (नाट्यशास्त्र, natya-shastra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition of performing arts, (e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nāṭya) and poetic works (kāvya).

Pāñcarātra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

First of the six Gunas (ṣaḍguṇa); jñānam (Knowledge, omniscience) this is the essential attribute of the Supreme Being.

Source: SriMatham: Vaiṣṇava Iconology based on Pañcarātra Āgama

about this context:

Pāñcarātra (पाञ्चरात्र, pancaratra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Nārāyaṇa is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaiṣnavism, the Pāñcarātra literature includes various Āgamas and tantras incorporating many Vaiṣnava philosophies.

General definition (in Hinduism)

1) Jnana (ज्ञान): Knowledge of the eternal and real

2) Jñāna is a Sanskrit word that means knowledge. It has various nuances of meaning depending on the context, and is used in a number of different Indian religions. The idea of jnana centers around a cognitive event which is recognized when experienced. It is knowledge inseparable from the total experience of reality, especially a total reality, or supreme being within Mahesha-dhama (and/or material world) such as Siva-Sakti.

etymology: Jñāna or gñāna (/dʒəˈnɑːnə/,[1] Sanskrit; Pali: ñāṇa)

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Relevant definitions

Search found 96 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

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In the Jñānamudrā (ज्ञानमुद्रा), the tips of the middle finger and of the thumb are joined t...
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Māyā
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Search found 411 books containing Jnana or Jñāna. You can also click to the full overview containing English textual excerpts. Below are direct links for the 20 most relevant articles:

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