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Jvala, aka: Jvālā; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Jvala means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. Check out some of the following descriptions and leave a comment if you want to add your own contribution to this article.

In Hinduism

Purāṇa

1a) Jvālā (ज्वाला).—(Aṅgāraka) a class of piśācas.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 377.

1b) After the conquest of the three worlds by Viṣṇu, the Devas, including Brahmā praised him; Brahmā was the creator while Viṣṇu was the creator and destroyer of worlds; during their discussion there was a jvālā in the north which spread over all the worlds out of which came Linga which went on growing. To see its beginning and end both agreed to go above and below respectively; they went on for 1000 years; it was beyond reckoning; hence both praised Śiva for light; Śiva said that Brahmā was the right hand and Viṣṇu his left hand and disappeared.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 55. 17-61.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

about this context:

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Śilpaśāstra (iconography)

The flame (jvālā)—held in the upper left hand of Śiva (as Naṭarāja)—represents the flame of destruction and transformation. An object when consumed by the fire is destroyed in one sense but transformed into energy and thus continues in another more subtle form. In the same way our physical bodies and the universe are destroyed but the Self (Ātman) continues to exist in a subtle form as does the universe. Nothing is destroyed absolutely — it only undergoes changes and change is the only thing constant in our world.

Source: Red Zambala: Hindu Icons and Symbols | Trinity

about this context:

Śilpaśāstra (शिल्पशास्त्र, shilpa-shastra) represents the ancient Indian science of creative arts such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vāstuśāstra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Relevant text

Search found 18 books containing Jvala or Jvālā. You can also click to the full overview containing English textual excerpts. Below are direct links for the 20 most relevant articles:

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