Jitendriya, Jita-indriya, Jitemdriya, Jitēndriya: 17 definitions

Introduction:

Jitendriya means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Jitendriya in Ayurveda glossary
Source: archive.org: Vagbhata’s Ashtanga Hridaya Samhita (first 5 chapters)

Jitendriya (जितेन्द्रिय) refers to one “having subjugated his senses”, mentioned in verse 4.25 of the Aṣṭāṅgahṛdayasaṃhitā (Sūtrasthāna) by Vāgbhaṭa.—Accordingly, “[...] He, however, who desires welfare both after his death and here shall always suppress the urges of avarice, jealousy, hatred, envy, passion, etc. after having subjugated his senses [viz., jitendriya]”.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Jitendriya in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

1) Jitendriya (जितेन्द्रिय) refers to one who is “a conqueror of the senses”, according to the second recension of the Yogakhaṇḍa of the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, as the Goddess (i.e., Khageśī) said to the God (i.e., Bhairava), “[...] I will tell (you) how Yoginīs and Siddhas behave—(a teaching) that is never easy to acquire.[...] Worship is offered (by means of these things) to the oral scripture (that the god and goddess transmit) to one another. (The latter) is the arising of the transmission of the Command and the essential meaning of scripture, which is (the teaching concerning) the group of six (parts that constitute the liturgy). It is very tough and frightening (raudra) with its (secret) terminology, conventions and rituals. Tranquil, forbearing, free of anger, the eater of food, a beggar of food and conqueror of the senses [i.e., jitendriya]—as long as one is not like this, how can one (achieve) accomplishment in the Kula?”.

2) Jitendriya (जितेन्द्रिय) refers to “one who is self-controlled” representing a desirable characteristic of a true practicioner, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra.—Accordingly, “(A true practitioner) is a hero (vīra) who exerts himself and is courageous. He is content, devoted to the teacher, not greedy, compassionate, industrious, self-controlled [i.e., jitendriya], of good appearance, sāttvika, deep, all his limbs are intact (and) active, he knows (true) devotion and the scriptures and crosses over into (higher) realities. He is devoted to the transmission which is free of thought (nirvikalpakrama), he eats what he has begged and is desireless. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Jitendriya in Shaivism glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Jitendriya (जितेन्द्रिय) refers to “controlling one’s senses”, according to the 9th-century Sarvajñānottaratantra chapter 18.—Accordingly, “Next, I shall teach the best observance among observances, which is known as the Śiva-vrata and which is revered by Asuras and Gods alike. [...] He should dwell constantly in a temple of Śiva, eating alms, controlling his senses (jitendriya), devoted to recitation and meditation, maintaining silence, venerating Śiva, the fire and his guru. When a year has passed, he will become equal to Śiva. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (architecture)

Jitendriya (जितेन्द्रिय) or Sujitendriya refers to “(having one’s) senses well-subordinated”, according to the Devyāmata (chapter 105).—Accordingly, [while describing the construction of residence for initiates]—“A residence is recommended to the south of the temple. The residence should be built beyond the outer wall of the temple. It is to be dwelt in by initiates, their senses well-subordinated (su-jitendriya), who have come to the image. Or, in its absence, [they should dwell in] another pleasant place. [...]”.

Vastushastra book cover
context information

Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Jitendriya in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

jitēndriya (जितेंद्रिय).—a S Of subdued affections and passions.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

jitēndriya (जितेंद्रिय).—a Of subdued affections and passions.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Jitendriya in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Jitendriya (जितेन्द्रिय).—a. one who has conquered his passions or subdued the senses (rūpa, rasa, gandha, sparśa & śabda); श्रुत्वा स्पृष्ट्वाऽथ दृष्ट्वा च भुक्त्वा घ्रात्वा च यो नरः । न हृष्यति ग्लायति वा स विज्ञेयो चितेन्द्रियः (śrutvā spṛṣṭvā'tha dṛṣṭvā ca bhuktvā ghrātvā ca yo naraḥ | na hṛṣyati glāyati vā sa vijñeyo citendriyaḥ) Manusmṛti 2.98.

Jitendriya is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jita and indriya (इन्द्रिय).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jitendriya (जितेन्द्रिय).—mfn.

(-yaḥ-yā-yaṃ) Having subdued the senses, calm, unmoved. m.

(-yaḥ) An ascetic, a sage, one who has completely subdued his passions. E. jita subdued, indriya an organ of sense. jitāni vaśīkṛtāni indriyāṇi yena .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jitendriya (जितेन्द्रिय).—adj. one who has subdued his senses, [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 49, 53.

Jitendriya is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms jita and indriya (इन्द्रिय).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jitendriya (जितेन्द्रिय).—[adjective] having suppressed the organs of sense, [abstract] tva [neuter]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Jitendriya (जितेन्द्रिय) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—on [dharma] Quoted in Smṛtiratnāvalī by Trimalla.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Jitendriya (जितेन्द्रिय):—[from jita > ji] mfn. = tākṣa, [Manu-smṛti ii vi f.; Rāmāyaṇa i]

2) [v.s. ...] m. an ascetic, [Horace H. Wilson]

3) [v.s. ...] Name of a man (author of a Nibandha)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Jitendriya (जितेन्द्रिय):—[jite+ndriya] (yaḥ) 1. m. One who has subdued his appetites, passions.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Jitendriya (जितेन्द्रिय) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit words: Jiiṃdiya, Jieṃdiya.

[Sanskrit to German]

Jitendriya in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Jitendriya in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Jitēṃdriya (ಜಿತೇಂದ್ರಿಯ):—[noun] a man who has restrained his passions, compelling emotions, excitements, etc.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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