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Ananda, aka: Ānanda, Ānandā; 14 Definition(s)

Introduction

Ananda means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. Check out some of the following descriptions and leave a comment if you want to add your own contribution to this article.

In Hinduism

Nāṭyaśāstra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Ānanda (आनन्द, “joy”) refers to ‘joy’ in the attainment of the desired object. Ānanda represents one of the fourteen nirvahaṇasandhi, according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 21. Nirvahaṇasandhi refers to the “segments (sandhi) of the concluding part (nirvahaṇa)” and represents one of the five segments of the plot (itivṛtta or vastu) of a dramatic composition (nāṭaka).

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Ānanda (आनन्द).—One of the fourteen elements of the ‘concluding segment’ (nirvahaṇasandhi);—(Description:) Attaining objects of one’s desire is called Joy (ānanda).

Source: archive.org: Natya Shastra

about this context:

Nāṭyaśāstra (नाट्यशास्त्र, natya-shastra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition of performing arts, (e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nāṭya) and poetic works (kāvya).

Śaivism (Śaiva philosophy)

Ānanda (आनन्द) is the tradition (ovallī) founded by Olinātha, who was one of the twelve princes born to Kuṃkumā, consort to Mīnanātha, who is the incarnation of Siddhanātha in the fourth yuga, belonging to the Pūrvāmnāya (‘eastern doctrine’) tradition of Kula Śaivism, according to the Ciñcinīmatasārasamuccaya. Siddhanātha incarnates as a Kaula master in each of the four yugas. Olinātha was one of the six princes having the authority to teach.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śaivism

about this context:

Śaiva (शैव, shaiva) or Śaivism (shaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Śiva as the supreme being. Closeley related to Śāktism, Śaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Purāṇa

1a) Ānanda (आनन्द).——(c)—a kingdom adjoining the Dundubhi hill in Plakṣadvīpa.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 14. 39; 17. 16.

1b) A Satya god.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 36. 35.

1c) The Lord of first kalpa consisting 100 lakhs of years by name Bhāva; this is the place of Brahmā.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 21. 28.

1d) A son of Medhātithi; a varṣa after his name, in Plakṣadvīpa.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 33. 32; Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 4. 4 and 5.

1e) A varṣa centering round the Dundubhi hill of Plakṣa.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 49. 14.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

about this context:

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Śāktism (Śākta philosophy)

Ānandā (आनन्दा, “bliss, happiness”):—Name of one of the goddesses to be worshipped during Āvaraṇapūjā (“Worship of the Circuit of Goddesses”), according to the Durgāpūjātattva (“The truth concerning Durgā’s ritual”). They should be worshipped with either the five upācāras or perfume and flowers.

Her mantra is as follows:

ह्रीं ओं आनन्दायै नमः
hrīṃ oṃ ānandāyai namaḥ

Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism

about this context:

Śākta (शाक्त, shakta) or Śāktism (shaktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devī) is revered and worshipped. Śāka literature includes a range of scriptures, including various tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

In Buddhism

Vajrayāna (tantric Buddhism)

The Four Types of Bliss (ānanda) are part of the Sixteen Aspects (ṣoḍaśākārā) of Gnosis (jñāna) in terms of conventional reality.

  1. the bliss of the mind (cittānanda),
  2. the bliss of the body (kāyānanda),
  3. the bliss of speech (vāg-ānanda),
  4. the bliss of gnosis (jāñānanda).
Source: Google Books: The Inner Kalacakratantra: A Buddhist Tantric View of the Individual

about this context:

Vajrayāna (वज्रयान, vajrayana) Buddhism represents the esoteric (tantra) school of Buddhism. Literature includes a range of tantras with the purpose of offering the practicioner various routes to enlightenment.

Pali

Ānanda, (Vedic ānanda, fr. ā + nand, cp. BSk. ānandī joy Divy 37) joy, pleasure, bliss, delight D.I, 3; Sn.679, 687; J.I, 207 (°maccha Leviathan); VI, 589 (°bheri festive drum); DA.I, 53 (= pītiyā etaṃ adhivacanaṃ). (Page 100)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

ānanda : (m.) joy; pleasure.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

about this context:

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

General definition (in Buddhism)

Ānanda (आनन्द) first obtaind the fruit of srotāpanna, then after having served the Buddha for twenty-five years and after the Buddha’s parinirvāṇa, he became arhat.

Source: Wisdom Library: The Treatise on the Great Virtue of Wisdom, Volume V

According Śekoddesa-ṭīkā there are four kinds of bliss, i.e.

  1. Ānanda,
  2. Paramānanda,
  3. Viramānanda
  4. and Sahajānanda.

The firsty state of Ānanda is the bliss when the Bodhicitta is in the Nirmankāya, second state of Paramānanda is when Bodhicitta is inthe Dharmacakra, third state of bliss (Viramānanda) is when Bodhicitta is in the Sambhogacakra and Sahajānanda is in the state when Bodhicitta is in the Mahāsukha-kāya. A Vajra-tantra says that Ānanda means ordinary pleasure, Paramānanda is more intense, Viramānanda refers to detachment from the transient pleasure and Sahajānanda is a state of Mahāsukha.

Corresponsing to the four stages of Ānanda there is the four states of mind,

  1. Jāgrat (wakefulness),
  2. Svapna (dream),
  3. Suṣupti (deep-sleep)
  4. and Turīya (samādhi).

Again it refers to four kinds of elements, i.e.

  1. Kāya (body),
  2. Vāk (speech),
  3. Citta (mind)
  4. and Jñāna (knowledge).
Source: Google Books: Buddhist Tantra: A Philosophical Reflection and Religious Investigation

1. Ananda - One of the principal disciples of the Buddha. He was a first cousin of the Buddha and was deeply attached to him.

He came to earth from Tusita and was born on the same day as the Bodhisatta, his father being Amitodana the Sakiyan, brother of Suddhodana. Mahanama and Anuruddha were therefore his brothers (or probably step brothers). According to the Mtu.iii.176, Ananda was the son of Suklodana and the brother of Devadatta and Upadhana. His mother was Mrgi.

Ananda entered the Order in the second year of the Buddhas ministry, together with other Sakiyan princes, such as Bhaddiya, Anuruddha, Bhagu, Kimbila and Devadatta, and was ordained by the Buddha himself (Vin.ii.182), his upajjhaya being Belatthasisa (ThagA.i.68; also DA.ii.418ff.; Vin.i.202; iv. 86). Soon after, he heard a discourse by Punna Mantaniputta and became a Sotapanna. In S.iii.105 Ananda acknowledges his indebtedness to Punna and gives an account of Punnas sermon to him.

During the first twenty years after the Enlightenment, the Buddha did not have the same personal attendants all the time. From time to time various monks looked after him, among them being Nagasamala, Nagita, Upavana, Sunakkhatta, the novice Cunda, Sagata, Radha and Meghiya. We are told that the Buddha was not particularly pleased with any of them. At the end of twenty years, at an assembly of the monks, the Buddha declared that he was advanced in years and desired to have somebody as his permanent body servant, one who would respect his wishes in every way. The Buddha says that sometimes his attendants would not obey him, and on certain occasions had dropped his bowl and robe and gone away, leaving him.

All the great disciples offered their services, but were rejected by the Buddha. Ananda alone was left; he sat in silence. When asked why he did not offer himself, his reply was that the Buddha knew best whom to choose. When the Buddha signified that he desired to have Ananda, the latter agreed to accept the post on certain conditions. The Buddha was never to give him any choice food or garment (*) gotten by him, nor appoint for him a separate fragrant cell (residence), nor include him in the invitations accepted by the Buddha. For, he said, if the Buddha did any of these things, some would say that Anandas services to the Buddha were done in order to get clothes, good fare and lodging and be included in the invitations. Further he was to be allowed to accept invitations on behalf of the Buddha; to bring to the Buddha those who came to see him from afar; to place before the Buddha all his perplexities, and the Buddha was to repeat to him any doctrine taught in his absence. If these concessions were not granted, he said, some would ask where was the advantage of such service.

-- or --

One of the five daughters of the chief queen of the king of the third Okkaka dynasty (DA.i.Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

Ananda was one of the principle disciples of the Buddha and was with Him during last 25 years of His life. He is known for establishing the order of nuns. He was also picked up at the First Councli, by President Kasyapa, to recite all the sermons preached by the Buddha.

Source: Buddhism Tourism: Glossary of Buddhist Terms

Ananda was one of many principal disciples and a devout attendant of the Buddha. Amongst the Buddhas many disciples, Ananda had the most retentive memory and most of the suttas in the Sutta Pitaka are attributed to his recollection of the Buddhas teachings during the First Buddhist Council. For that, he was known as the Guardian of the Dharma.

According to the Buddha every Buddha in the past and to come will have two chief disciples and one attendant during his ministry. In the case of Gautama Buddha the pair of disciples were Sariputta and Mahamoggallana and the attendant Ananda.

The word Ananda means bliss in Pali, Sanskrit as well as other Indian languages. It is a popular Buddhist and Hindu name.

In the Kannakatthala Sutta (MN 90), Ananda is identified with the meaning of his name:

Then King Pasenadi Kosala said to the Blessed One, "Lord, what is the name of this monk?"
"His name is Ananda, great king."
"What a joy he is! What a true joy!..."

Ananda was the first cousin of the Buddha by their fathers, and was devoted to him. In the twentieth year of the Buddhas ministry, he became the Buddhas personal attendant, accompanying him on most of his wanderings and taking the part of interlocutor in many of the recorded dialogues. He is the subject of a special panegyric delivered by the Buddha just before the Buddhas Parinibbana (the Mahaparinibbana Sutta (DN 16)); it is a panegyric for a man who is kindly, unselfish, popular, and thoughtful toward others.

Source: WikiPedia: BuddhismOne of the Shakyamuni Buddhas Ten Great Disciples. He was first in hearing the Buddhas words. As he had excellent memory, he memorized the Buddhas sermons, which were later recorded as sutras. He was also the cousin of Shakyamuni Buddha.Source: Buddhist Door: Glossary

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Search found 741 books containing Ananda, Ānanda or Ānandā. You can also click to the full overview containing English textual excerpts. Below are direct links for the 20 most relevant articles:

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