Anana, Ānana, Ānanā, Anaṇa: 22 definitions

Introduction:

Anana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: gurumukhi.ru: Ayurveda glossary of terms

Ānana (आनन):—[ānanam] Face

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Ānana (आनन) refers to the “head”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 5), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “[...] Now, if [Rāhu] has a body or be simply a head with a regular motion in the ecliptic, how comes it that he eclipses the sun and moon when they are 180° from him? If his motion be not subject to fixed laws, how comes it that his exact place is ascertained; how comes it that he never eclipses by the part of his body between his head and tail [i.e., puccha-ānana]? If being of the shape of a serpent he eclipses with his head or with his tail, how comes it that he does not hide one half of the heavens lying between his head and tail?”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Ānana (आनन) refers to the “face”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, “He has eight faces and, very powerful, shines like a white lotus. He is mightily proud and has sharp teeth and great body. He is terrible and fierce and his face is deformed [i.e., vikṛta-ānana]. O Śambhu, he has twenty arms and the goddess sits on his lap. He holds a sword, mallet and noose, a double-headed drum, a dagger, the Kaustubha jewel, a rosary, a skull bowl full of fruit and the like and a piece of human flesh. [...]”.

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Ānanā (आनना) refers to a “face”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.8.—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated to Sage Nārada:—“O sage, all these details you mentioned to the lord of mountains. You told the previous history of Pārvatī that increased her pleasure and on hearing which, the lord of mountains, his wife and children were freed from all suspicions. On hearing the story from Nārada, Pārvatī bent down her head in bashfulness but her smile heightened [i.e., ānanā] the beauty of her face. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

anaṇa : (adj.) free of debt.

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ānana : (nt.) face; mouth.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

Ānana, (nt.) (Vedic āna, later Sk. ānana from an to breathe) the mouth; adj. (-°) having a mouth Sdhp.103; Pgdp 63 (vikaṭ°). (Page 100)

Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ānana (आनन).—n (S) The mouth. Ex. vacana hēṃ nighatāṃ ṛṣi ānanīṃ || 2 The face.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

ānana (आनन).—n The mouth; the face.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Anana (अनन).—a. [an lyuṭ] Act of breathing, living &c.

Derivable forms: ananam (अननम्).

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Ānana (आनन).—[ānityanena, ā-an karaṇe lyuṭ]

1) The mouth, face; R.3.3; नृपस्य कान्तं पिबतः सुताननम् (nṛpasya kāntaṃ pibataḥ sutānanam) 17.

2) A large division of a work, chapter, book &c. (e. g. the two ānanas of Rasagaṅgādhara.)

Derivable forms: ānanam (आननम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Añāna (अञान).—(a-ñāna) (nt.; Pali añāṇa; MIndic for ajñāna, § 2.15), ignorance: jñānaṃ na kalpeti, añānu (n. sg.) no bhavet Mūla-madhyamaka-kārikā 157.1 (verse; no v.l.).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ānana (आनन).—n.

(-naṃ) The mouth, (and by syncope) the face. E. āṅa before ana to live or breathe, lyuṭa aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ānana (आनन).—i. e. an + ana, n. 1. The mouth; the face, [Ṛtusaṃhāra] 6, 30. 2. A point, [Rāmāyaṇa] 6, 79, 69.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ānana (आनन).—[neuter] mouth, face.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Anana (अनन):—[from an] n. breathing, living, [Nirukta, by Yāska]

2) Ānana (आनन):—[from āna] a n. the mouth

3) [v.s. ...] the face, [Rāmāyaṇa; Raghuvaṃśa] etc.

4) [v.s. ...] entrance, door, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) b See under āna above.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Goldstücker Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Anana (अनन):—n.

(-nam) Breathing, living. E. an, kṛt aff. lyuṭ.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Ānana (आनन):—[ā-nana] (naṃ) n. The mouth; the face.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Ānana (आनन) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Āṇaṇa.

[Sanskrit to German]

Anana in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Ānana (आनन) [Also spelled anan]:—(nm) face; mouth.

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

1) Āṇaṇa (आणण) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Ānana.

2) Āṇaṇa (आणण) also relates to the Sanskrit word: Ānayana.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Ānana (ಆನನ):—

1) [noun] the front of the head from the top of the forehead to the bottom of the chin, and from ear to ear; the face.

2) [noun] the opening through which an animal takes in food, including the teeth, tongue etc.; the mouth.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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