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Svastika, 7 Definition(s)

Introduction

Svastika means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. Check out some of the following descriptions and leave a comment if you want to add your own contribution to this article.

In Hinduism

Purāṇa

Svastika (स्वस्तिक).—A Nāga in the fifth talam or mahātalam.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 20. 37; Vāyu-purāṇa 50. 36.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

about this context:

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Āyurveda (science of life)

Svastika (स्वस्तिक) is another name (synonym) for Śitāvarī, which is a Sanskrit name for a plant. This synonym was identified by Narahari in his 13th-century Rājanighaṇṭu (verses 5.50-51), which is an Āyurvedic medicinal thesaurus.

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

about this context:

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Hindu science dealing with subjects such as health, medicine, anatomy, etc. and has been in use throughout India since ancient times.

Vāstuśāstra (architecture)

1) Svastika (स्वस्तिक):—One of the eight types of villages, according to Chapter 9 of the Mānasāra (called the grāmalakṣaṇam). The Mānasāra is one of the traditional authorative Hindu treatises on Vāstuśāstra. The form of this village is said to be tattadrūpeṇa, which means it represents the form of the meaning of its Sanskrit name.

2) Svastika (स्वस्तिक) is a Sanskrit technical term referring to a type of temple (prāsāda) classified under the group named Vairāja, according to Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra chapter 49. The Vairāja group contains twenty-four out of a sixty-four total prāsādas (temples) classified under five prime vimānas (aerial car/palace), which were created by Brahmā for as many gods (including himself). The group represents temples (eg. Svastika) that are to be square shaped. The prāsādas, or ‘temples’, represent the dwelling place of God and are to be built in towns. The Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra is an 11th-century encyclopedia dealing with various topics from the Vāstuśāstra.

Svastika is mentioned in another list from the Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra chapter 56, being part of the group named Lalita, containing 25 unique temple varieties.

Svastika is also mentioned as a classification of ‘temple’ in the Īśānaśivagurudevapaddhati which features a list of 52 temple types. This list represents the classification of temples in South-India.

Svastika is also listed in the Agnipurāṇa which features a list of 45 temple types. It is listed under the group named Triviṣṭapa, featuring octagonal-shaped temples. This list represents a classification of temples in Nort-India.

3) Svastika (स्वस्तिक) is a Sanskrit technical term referring to a variety of prāsāda (‘superstructure’, or, upper storey of any building), according to the Mayamata (5th-century guidebook on Dravidian architecture).

The Svastika variety in the Divatala (‘two-storey’) group has the following decorative components:

Number of talas (levels): 2;
Shape of grīva (neck) and śikhara (head): Square;
Number of śālas: 4;
Number of kūṭas: 4;
Number of pañajaras: 8;
Number of alpanāsis: 48;
Number of mahānāsis: 4;

The Svastika variety in the Tritala (‘three-storey’) group has the following decorative components:

Number of talas (levels): 3;
Shape of grīva (neck) and śikhara (head): Square;
Number of śālas: 8;
Number of kūṭas: 8;
Number of pañjaras: 8;
Number of alpanāsis: 96;

4) Svastika (स्वस्तिक) also refers to a category of gopura, which is the “tower” built above the gateway of a house, palace or Buddhist monastery.

Source: Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstra

about this context:

Vāstuśāstra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vastu-shastra) refers to the knowledge of architecture. It is a branch of ancient Indian science dealing with topics such architecture, construction, sculpture and their relation with the cosmic universe.

Nāṭyaśāstra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

1a) Svastika (स्वस्तिक).—One of the 108 karaṇas (minor dance movement) mentioned in the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 4. The instructions for this svastika-karaṇa is as follows, “hands and feet respectively held together in the Svastika form.”. A karaṇa represents a minor dance movements and combines sthāna (standing position), cārī (foot and leg movement) and nṛttahasta (hands in dancing position).

1b) A gesture (āṅgika) made with ‘combined hands’ (saṃyuta), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. Svastika is also the name for a type of gesture (āṅgika) made with ‘dance hands’ (nṛttahasta). The hands (hasta) form a part of the human body which represents one of the six major limbs (aṅga) used in dramatic performance. With these limbs are made the various gestures (āṅgika), which form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya).

1c) A specific gesture (āṅgika), or “movements made with the arms (bāhu)”, according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 9. These movements form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya).

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

1) Svastika (स्वस्तिक).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made with combined hands (saṃyuta-hasta);—(Instructions): Two Arāla or Vardhamāna hands upturned and held together at the wrists on the left side will form the Svastika. It is to be used by women.

(Uses): When the hands are separated from the Svastika position, it will indicate directions, clouds, the sky, forests, seas, seasons, the earth and similar [other] extensive things.

2) Svastika (स्वस्तिक).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made with dance-hands (nṛttahasta);—(Instructions): The Talamukha hands crossed at the wrists; but released after this they are called Viprakīrṇa. The Dance-hands are to be used in forming Karaṇas.

Source: archive.org: Natya Shastra

1) One of the saṃyutta-hastāni (Twenty-four combined Hands).—Svastika (crossed): two Patāka hands held together at the wrists. Usage: crocodile, timid speech, dispute, praising.

2) One of the saṃyutta-hastāni (Twenty-six combined Hands).—Svastika (crossed): Tripatāka hands crossed on the left side. Patron deity Guha. Usage: Wishing-tree, mountains.

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)

about this context:

Nāṭyaśāstra (नाट्यशास्त्र, natya-shastra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition of performing arts, (e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nāṭya) and poetic works (kāvya).

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Svastika (स्वस्तिक).—One of the eight providential symbols, or, aṣṭamaṅgala.—Svastika at the brief but momentus occasion of Jineśvara’s birth an absolute peace prevailed in the three worlds, martyaloka (terrestrial world), the svargaloka (celestial world) and pātālaloka (neither world). Svastika is the symbol of that moment of tranquility.

Source: Shodhganga: A cultural study on the jain western Indian illustrated manuscripts

Relevant definitions

Search found 53 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Svastikaliṅga
Svastikaliṅga (स्वस्तिकलिङ्ग) is a Sanskrit word referring to one of the classes of mānuṣali...
Muṣṭikasvastika
Muṣṭikasvastika (मुष्टिकस्वस्तिक).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made with dance-hands (n...
Pṛṣṭhasvastika
Pṛṣṭhasvastika (पृष्ठस्वस्तिक).—One of the 108 karaṇas (minor dance movement) mentione...
Vakṣaḥsvastika
Vakṣaḥsvastika (वक्षःस्वस्तिक).—One of the 108 karaṇas (minor dance movement) mentione...
Diksvastika
Diksvastika (दिक्स्वस्तिक).—One of the 108 karaṇas (minor dance movement) mentioned in...
Ardhasvastika
Ardhasvastika (अर्धस्वस्तिक).—One of the 108 karaṇas (minor dance movement) mentioned ...
Pārśvasvastika
Pārśvasvastika (पार्श्वस्वस्तिक).—One of the 32 aṅgahāras (major dance movement) menti...
Muṣṭi-svastika
One of the saṃyutta-hastāni (Twenty-six combined Hands).—Muṣṭi-svastika (crossed fists...
Svastikāsana
Svastikāsana (स्वस्तिकासन, “svastiaka posture”) is a Sanskrit word referring to ...
Kartarī-svastika
One of the saṃyutta-hastāni (Twenty-four combined Hands).—Kartarī-svastika (crossed ar...
Svastikarecita
1) Svastikarecita (स्वस्तिकरेचित).—One of the 108 karaṇas (minor dance movement) menti...
Maṇḍalasvastika
Maṇḍalasvastika (मण्डलस्वस्तिक).—One of the 108 karaṇas (minor dance movement) mention...
Dvisvastika
Dvisvastika (द्विस्वस्तिक) refers to a category of gopura, which is the “tower” ...
Padasvastika
The Padasvastika-asana is an Asana (position of body). The weight is supported on one leg, w...
Hastasvastika
Hastasvastika—The arms crossed in front of the chest indicate total surrender to a god...

Relevant text

Search found 43 books containing Svastika. You can also click to the full overview containing English textual excerpts. Below are direct links for the 20 most relevant articles:

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