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Shridhara, aka: Śrīdharā, Shri-dhara, Śrīdhara; 9 Definition(s)


Shridhara means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Śrīdharā and Śrīdhara can be transliterated into English as Sridhara or Shridhara, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Pāñcarātra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Śrīdhara (श्रीधर, “The bearer of Śrī who listens-to-prayers”):—One of the twenty-four forms of Viṣṇu through which Nārāyaṇa manifests himself. He is accompanied by a counterpart emanation of Lakṣmī (an aspect of Devī) who goes by the name Medhā.

Source: Wisdom Library: PāñcarātraPāñcarātra book cover
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Pāñcarātra (पाञ्चरात्र, pancaratra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Nārāyaṇa is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaiṣnavism, the Pāñcarātra literature includes various Āgamas and tantras incorporating many Vaiṣnava philosophies.


A Sridhara stone has the marks of five lines, that of a garland of forest flowers and that of a club.

Source: archive.org: The Garuda puranam

Śrīdhara (श्रीधर).—A name of Viṣṇu.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 111. 21.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana IndexPurāṇa book cover
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The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Vāstuśāstra (architecture)

Śrīdhara (श्रीधर) refers to a type of temple (prāsāda) classified, according to Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra chapter 57. The temple is mentioned as one of the nine temples being a favorite of Bhagavatī. The Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra is an 11th-century encyclopedia dealing with various topics from the Vāstuśāstra.

Śrīdhara is found in another list in the Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra, chapter 60, where it is mentioned in a list of thirty-six Prāsādas (temples) having activities of the townsmen entailing Sādhārās.

Source: Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstraVāstuśāstra book cover
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Vāstuśāstra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vastu-shastra) refers to the knowledge of architecture. It is a branch of ancient Indian science dealing with topics such architecture, construction, sculpture and their relation with the cosmic universe.

Nāṭyaśāstra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Śrīdharā (श्रीधरा) refers to a type of syllabic metre (vṛtta), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 16. In this metre, the first four, the tenth, the eleventh, the thirteenth, the fourteenth and the seventeenth syllables of a foot (pāda) are heavy (guru), while the rest of the syllables are light (laghu). It is also known by the name Mandākrāntā.


Śrīdharā falls in the Atyaṣṭi class of chandas (rhythm-type), which implies that verses constructed with this metre have four pādas (‘foot’ or ‘quarter-verse’) containing seventeen syllables each.

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstraNāṭyaśāstra book cover
context information

Nāṭyaśāstra (नाट्यशास्त्र, natya-shastra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition of performing arts, (e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nāṭya) and poetic works (kāvya).

General definition (in Hinduism)

Sridhar Acharya (c. 870, India – c. 930 India) was an Indian mathematician, Sanskrit pundit and philosopher. He was born in Bhurishresti (Bhurisristi or Bhurshut) village in South Radha (at present Hughli) in the 10th Century AD. His father's name was Baladev Acharya and mother's name was Acchoka. His father was also a Sanskrit pundit.

He was known for two treatises: Trisatika (sometimes called the Patiganitasara) and the Patiganita. His major work Patiganitasara was named Trisatika because it was written in three hundred slokas. The book discusses counting of numbers, measures, natural number, multiplication, division, zero, squares, cubes, fraction, rule of three, interest-calculation, joint business or partnership and mensuration.

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Shridhara, (flourished c. 750, India), highly esteemed Hindu mathematician who wrote several treatises on the two major fields of Indian mathematics, pati-ganita (“mathematics of procedures,” or algorithms) and bija-ganita (“mathematics of seeds,” or equations).

Source: Encyclopædia Britannica: Hinduism

The mathematical works of Śrīdhara were very popular and made him quite famous. In spite of his great popularity, some controversies have been raised about his life, work, and time, such as whether he was a Hindu or a Jaina, and whether he wrote before or after Mahāvīra (ninth century AD). Some uncertainties exist because Śrīdhara's works are not fully extant. Often he is confused with other authors of the same name.

Like so many ancient Indian authors, Śrīdhara did not provide any information about himself in his works. Other sources have not been helpful in finding any glimpse of his personal life. So we do not know his parents or teachers, or even where he was born, educated, or worked. But some evidence shows that he was a Saivite Hindu. An example in his Pāṭīgaṇita is about the payment for the worship of the five‐faced Hindu god Śiva. He starts his Triśatikā with a homage to the same god.

Source: Springer: Śrīdhara

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Śrīdhara (श्रीधर).—Ārya Śrīdhara was Pārśvanātha’s sixth Gaṇadhara. His father’s name was Nāgabala and mother's name was Mahāsundarī. He got married to king Prasenajita’s daughter Rājamatī. Remembering his past birth and the untimely death of his younger brother became the prime reasons for his taking initiation.

Source: HereNow4U: Lord Śrī Pārśvanātha

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