Shridevi, Śrīdevī, Shri-devi: 4 definitions

Introduction

Shridevi means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śrīdevī can be transliterated into English as Sridevi or Shridevi, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (S) next»] — Shridevi in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Srīdevī (स्रीदेवी).—A daughter of Devaka and one of the seven wives of Vasudeva.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 44. 73.

1b) Born of milk ocean; image of: in the form of a girl of nine years, youthful, with round neck, red lips and charming brows and holding the lotus Śrīphalam in her hands.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 250. 3; 261. 40.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva

Śrīdevī (श्रीदेवी) is the name of a deity who was imparted with the knowledge of the Pārameśvarāgama by Sadāśiva through parasambandha, according to the pratisaṃhitā theory of Āgama origin and relationship (sambandha). The pārameśvara-āgama, being part of the eighteen Rudrabhedāgamas, refers to one of the twenty-eight Siddhāntāgama: a classification of the Śaiva division of Śaivāgamas. The Śaivāgamas represent the wisdom that has come down from lord Śiva, received by Pārvatī and accepted by Viṣṇu.

Śrīdevī in turn transmitted the Pārameśvarāgama (through mahānsambandha) to Uśana who then, through divya-sambandha, transmitted it to the Devas who, through divyādivya-sambandha, transmitted it to the Ṛṣis who finally, through adivya-sambandha, revealed the Pārameśvarāgama to human beings (Manuṣya). (also see Anantaśambhu’s commentary on the Siddhāntasārāvali of Trilocanaśivācārya)

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: Google Books: Jaina Iconography

Śrīdevī (श्रीदेवी).—One of the four types of Veśmadevas;—Worship of Śrīdevī protects the life of a child in the mother’s womb.

Source: archive.org: The Jaina Iconography

Śrīdevī (श्रीदेवी) or Śrīkāntā is the father of Kunthanātha: the seventeenth of twenty-four Tīrthaṃkaras or Jinas, commonly depicted in Jaina iconography.—Kunthanātha’s parent’s names, as may be gathered from the Jaina Purāṇas, are variously called Śūrasena, Sūrya, Śivarāja (Śvetāmbara version) for the father, Śrīkāntā or Śrīdevī for the mother. His father belonged to the Kuru race, and Hastināpura as his capital, where the Jina was born. He, like his predecessor, became an emperor.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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