Nyayakandali, Nyāyakaṇḍalī, Nyaya-kandali: 5 definitions

Introduction:

Nyayakandali means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Yoga (school of philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Nyayakandali in Yoga glossary
Source: Google Books: Yoga Powers

In his Nyāyakaṇḍalī, Śrīdhara provides the conceptual bridge between normal perception, yogi perception, and the power of entering into a foreign body, which was in fact the forte of yogis in epic and medieval narratives.

Yoga book cover
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Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

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Vaisheshika (school of philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Nyayakandali in Vaisheshika glossary
Source: Shodhganga: A study of Nyāya-vaiśeṣika categories (vaisesika)

Nyāyakaṇḍalī (न्यायकण्डली).—Another important commentary on Praśastapāda’s Bhāṣya is Nyāyakaṇḍalī written by Śrīdhara. Among the commentaries on Padārthadharmasaṃgraha, “Nyāya-Kaṇḍalī of Śrīdhara on account of its simplicity of style and elaborate nature of exposition is probably the best for a modern student of Vaiśeṣika”.

Vaisheshika book cover
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Vaisheshika (वैशेषिक, vaiśeṣika) refers to a school of orthodox Hindu philosophy (astika), drawing its subject-matter from the Upanishads. Vaisheshika deals with subjects such as logic, epistemology, philosophy and expounds concepts similar to Buddhism in nature

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General definition (in Hinduism)

[«previous next»] — Nyayakandali in Hinduism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Hinduism

The Nyāyakaṇḍalī (न्यायकण्डली) by Śrīdhara is a 10th century Sanskrit commentary on the Praśastapādabhāṣya of Praśastapādācārya, wich is itself a commentary on Kaṇāda’s Vaiśeṣikasūtra. The Vaiśeṣikasūtra expounds the philosophy of the Vaiśeṣika, one of the six orthodox schools of Hindu philosophy dealing with subjects such as Metaphysics, Logic and Epistemology..

Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Nyayakandali in Sanskrit glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Nyāyakandalī (न्यायकन्दली) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—a
—[commentary] on the Padārthadharmasaṃgraha, composed by Śrīdhara in 991. Kh. 88. Report. Xxv. Cxliii. L. 2589. Peters. 3, 26^a. 272. Bp. 6. 313.
—[commentary] by Prativādibhayaṃkara. Rice. 112.

2) Nyāyakandalī (न्यायकन्दली):—
—[commentary] Pañjikā by Rājaśekhara Sūri. Peters. 3, 272.

3) Nyāyakandalī (न्यायकन्दली):—a
—[commentary] on the Padārthadharmasaṃgraha, by Śrīdhara, son of Baladeva. L. 4186.
—[commentary] Padārthapraveśa by the same. Stein 148.
—[commentary] by Padmanābha, son of Balabhadra. See Praśastapādabhāṣya in the Vizianagram Sanskrit Series, Preface p. 4.
—[commentary] Pañjikā by Rājaśekhara. Peters. 3, 272.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Nyāyakandalī (न्यायकन्दली):—[=ny-āya-kandalī] [from ny-āya] f. Name of [work]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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