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Dhāraṇā, aka: Dharaṇa, Dhāraṇa, Dharana; 10 Definition(s)

Introduction

Dhāraṇā means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. Check out some of the following descriptions and leave a comment if you want to add your own contribution to this article.

The Sanskrit term Dhāraṇā can be transliterated into English as Dharana, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Śaivism (Śaiva philosophy)

Dhāraṇā (धारणा, “yoga practices”).—In Patañjali, the word dhāraṇā is used in a somewhat limited sense viz; ‘fixation of mind on a particular spot’. In Vijñānabhairava it is used in the wide sense of fixation or concentration of mind or yoga. The word yoga is used both in the sense of communion (with the Divine) and the means (upāya) for that communion. Vijñānabhairava mentions 112 dhāraṇās or types of yoga.

The means of communion with Bhairava have been classified under four broad heads in Śaivāgama, viz.,

  1. anupāya,
  2. śāmbhava,
  3. śākta,
  4. āṇava.
Source: archive.org: Vijnana Bhairava or Divine Consciousness

about this context:

Śaiva (शैव, shaiva) or Śaivism (shaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Śiva as the supreme being. Closeley related to Śāktism, Śaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

Vāstuśāstra (architecture)

Dhāraṇa (धारण) is another name (synonym) for stambha, a Sanskrit technical term referring to “pillar”. These synonyms are defined in texts such as Mayamata (verse 15.2), Mānasāra (verse 15.2-3), Kāśyapaśilpa (verse 8.2) and Īśānaśivagurudevapaddati (Kriya, verses 31.19-20).

Source: Wisdom Library: Vāstu-śāstra

about this context:

Vāstuśāstra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vastu-shastra) refers to the knowledge of architecture. It is a branch of ancient Indian science dealing with topics such architecture, construction, sculpture and their relation with the cosmic universe.

Purāṇa

Dhāraṇā (धारणा).—A form of Yoga in which the mind is controlled; dhyāna; seeing in himself, the characteristic of Siddhi; the time and place for doing it; not near fire, forest, river-bed, burial place, Caitya; the performer should not be hungry, careworn or be anxious; else the doer becomes mad, deaf and dumb or blind; hence pure Dhāraṇā is required; one engaged in this Yoga could take curds and Yava paste; enables Vāyu to go up and stand in its place; other branches of; thinking. of the upper worlds, mountains and oceans in his heart; eating mud from dried beans; 1000 pots of water for bath;1 the dharma of the Yoga destroys sins;2 800 times in the head;3 Dhāraṇa Agne1yī a special form of samādhi practised by Sati, the daughter of Dakṣa.4

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa I. 2. 42-3; III. 4. 26; 22. 75; Vāyu-purāṇa 11. 22-64; Viṣṇu-purāṇa VI. 7. 75-8.
  • 2) Vāyu-purāṇa 10. 76, 93.
  • 3) Ib. 12. 17; 19. 41; 104. 24.
  • 4) Ib. 30. 54.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

about this context:

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Yoga (school of philosophy)

Dhāraṇā (धारणा, “contemplation”) is a Sanskrit word referring to “your thoughts”. It is one of the eight brances of yoga, also known as the eightfold-path (aṣṭānga). Also see the fifth section of the Varāha-upaniṣad.

In yoga philosophy, this is the stage just before medition; the goal is to become aware of nothing but the object on which you are concentrating;

Source: Wisdom Library: Yoga

As Ballāla notes, Dhāraṇā (धारणा) can mean both fixing of the mind on a single object and fixing of the breath. (The two are linked: Vyāsa in his commentary to Yogasūtra 2.52 states that mental Dhāraṇā is brought about through breath-control; cf. Haṭhapradīpikā 4.23.)

Source: Google Books: The Khecarividya of Adinatha

about this context:

Yoga refers to the Ancient Indian school of philosophy combining the physical, mental and spiritual.

General definition (in Hinduism)

Dharana: Sanskrit word that means "holding" or "concentration." Refers to the yogic discipline of concentration on an object or symbol.

Source: Google Books: The Tree of Life: An Illustrated Study in Magic

In Buddhism

Pali

Dhāraṇā, (f.) (to dhāraṇa) 1. memory Miln.79.—2. the earth (“the upholder, ” cp. dharaṇī) J.VI, 180. (Page 341)

— or —

Dharaṇa, (adj.) bearing, holding, comprising VvA.104 (suvaṇṇassa pañcadasa° nikkha holding, i.e. worth or equal to 15 parts of gold).—f. —ī bearing, i.e. pregnant with Sn.26 (of cows: godharaṇiyo paveniyo=gabbhiniyo SnA 39). As n. the Earth J.V, 311; VI, 526; Miln.34; dharaṇī-ruha N. of a tree J.VI, 482, 497; Miln.376. (Page 340)

— or —

Dhāraṇa, (nt.) (cp. Sk. dhāraṇa, to dhāreti) 1. wearing, in mālā° (etc.) D.I, 5=A.II, 210=Pug.58; KhA 37; cīvara° A.II, 104=Pug.45.—2. maintaining, sustaining, keeping up Miln.320 (āyu° bhojana).—3. bearing in mind, remembrance Vin.IV, 305; M.II, 175 (dhamma°). (Page 341)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

dharaṇa : (nt.) a weight comprising about 2/5 of an ounce.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

about this context:

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

General definition (in Buddhism)

See Varana.

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Dharaṇa (धरण) is the father of Padmaprabha according to Digambara (according to Śvetāmbara he is named Dhara), according to the Ācāradinakara (14th century work on Jain conduct written by Vardhamāna Sūri). Padmaprabha is the sixth of twenty-four Tīrthaṅkaras in Janism. A Tīrthaṅkara is an enlightened being who has conquered saṃsāra (cycle of birth and death), leaving behind him a path for others to follow.

The wife of Dharaṇa is is Susīmā. It is an ancient Jain practice to worship the Tīrthaṅkara’s parents in various rites, such as the pratiṣṭhāvidhi.

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Relevant definitions

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Rasarūpādhāraṇā
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Jihvādhāraṇa
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Kala
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Piṇḍastha
Piṇḍastha (पिण्डस्थ).—One of the four types of saṃsthānavicaya (contemplation of objects of str...
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Cakra
Cakra (चक्र, “discus”).—One of the fourteen gems (ratna) serving the Cakravartin;—The cakra is ...
Sāma
Sama (सम).— The samas are a group of celestial beings living in the lower regions of adholoka (...
Āsana
Āsana (आसन) refers to a “seats” (sitting postures); it is a Sanskrit technical t...
Dhamma
1) Dhamma, 3 (adj.) (Sk. dhanvan) having a bow: see daḷha°; also as dhammin in daḷha&de...
Mālā
Mālā (माला).—Why are there 108 beads in the rosary (mālā)? Multiplying the different types of p...
Saṃyama
Saṃyama (संयम, “self-restraint”).—One of the seven sub categories of ascetics (nirgrantha-muni)...
Pavana
Pavana (पवन).—One of the five types of retentions (dhāraṇā) of saṃsthānavicaya (contemplation o...
Śāmbhava
Śāmbhava (शाम्भव) refers to a category of dhāraṇās according to the Śaivāgamas. The term dhāraṇ...
Kapittha
Kapittha (कपित्थ, “elephant-apple”).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made with ...
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Relevant text

Search found 87 books containing Dhāraṇā, Dharaṇa, Dhāraṇa or Dharana. You can also click to the full overview containing English textual excerpts. Below are direct links for the 20 most relevant articles:

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