Dharayat, Dhārayat: 4 definitions

Introduction:

Dharayat means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Dhārayat (धारयत्) refers to “holding (in one’s hand)”, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 3.17-23, while describing a meditation on Amṛteśa in his form as Mṛtyujit]—“And so now, having constructed the amṛtāmudrā or the padmamudrā, [the Mantrin] should meditate on the Ātman. [...] [He is] one-faced, three-eyed, seated on a white lotus, fixed in the bound lotus seat. [He is] four-armed, large-eyed, the hand [fixed in the position] of granting wishes and safety, [holding] a full moon, radiant, filled with amṛta, holding a water pot (kalaśakalaśaṃ dhārayantaṃ hi), [and] completely full of the world, the moon in his lovely hand. [The Mantrin] should remember him adorned with a reverence that is all white”.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (tantric Buddhism)

Dhārayat (धारयत्) refers to “carrying (in one’s hand)”, according to the Nāmamantrārthāvalokinī by Vilāsavajra, which is a commentary on the Nāmasaṃgīti.—Accordingly, [while describing Ādibuddha]—“[...] He is tranquil, with the ornaments of a youth, in fine clothing, wearing about himself a many coloured garment. He has eight arms, holding at his heart with four hands the Śatasāhasrikāprajñāpāramitā divided into four parts, [and] carrying (dhārayatdhārayantaṃ), in each of the other four hands, a sword of wisdom in the gesture of striking. [All this is to be] put in place [i.e. visualised] via the yoga of the four Buddha-thrones”.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Dhārayat (धारयत्).—mfn. (-yan-yantī-yat) 1. Having, possessing. 2. Acquainted with, versed in. 3. Holding as doctrine, believing, maintaining. E. dhṛ to have, śatṛ aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Dhārayat (धारयत्):—[from dhāra] mf(antī)n. holding, possessing, maintaining etc. (cf. below)

2) [v.s. ...] acquainted with, versed in [Horace H. Wilson]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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