Sumanas, aka: Su-manas; 6 Definition(s)

Introduction

Sumanas means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Sumanas (सुमनस्) is another name for Mahākarañja, which is a Sanskrit word referring to Millettia piscidia. It is classified as a medicinal plant in the system of Āyurveda (science of Indian medicine) and is used throughout literature such as the Suśrutasaṃhita and the Carakasaṃhitā. The synonym was identified in the Rājanighaṇṭu (verse 7.69), which is a 13th-century medicinal thesaurus.

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana

Sumanas in Purana glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

1) Sumanas (सुमनस्).—A kirāta (forest tribe) king who flourished in Yudhiṣṭhira’s court. (Mahābhārata Sabhā Parva, Chapter 4, Verse 25).

2) Sumanas (सुमनस्).—A king in ancient India who worshipped Yama in his court. (Mahābhārata Sabhā Parva, Chapter 9, Verse 13).

3) Sumanas (सुमनस्).—A Kekaya princess who lived in Devaloka. She once held a discussion on spiritual topics with Śāṇḍilīdevī. (Anuśāsana Parva, Chapter 123).

4) Sumanas (सुमनस्).—A son of Pūru in Dhruva’s lineage. Pūru had six mighty sons by his wife Atrī, viz. Aṅga, Sumanas, Svātī, Kratu, Aṅgiras and Gaya. (Agni Purāṇa, Chapter 13).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Katha (narrative stories)

Sumanas in Katha glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

1) Sumanas (सुमनस्) is the name of a Brāhman according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 56. Accordingly, “... Queen [Bandhumatī], I have not seen your husband anywhere, but I, who have to-day come to your house, am named, not without reason, the Brāhman Sumanas, so you will quickly have your wishes satisfied; thus my heart tells me”.

2) Sumanas (सुमनस्) is the name of an ancient king from Kāñcanapurī, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 58. Accordingly, as Śaktiyaśas said to Naravāhanadatta: “... in old time there was a city named Kāñcanapurī, and in it there lived a great king named Sumanas. He was of extraordinary splendour, and, crossing difficult and inaccessible regions, he conquered the fortresses and fastnesses of his foes”.

3) Sumanas (सुमनस्) is the daughter of Jayadatta from Ratnākara, as mentioned in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 123. Accordingly, as Sumanas said: “... I am the daughter of a crest-jewel of Brāhmans, named Jayadatta, who lived in the city of Ratnākara. My name is Sumanas, and one night I was married to a certain handsome young Brāhman, who was a suitable match for me”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Sumanas, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
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Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

1) Sumanas (सुमनस्) refers to one of the four bodhivṛkṣadevatās “deity of the Bodhi-tree” according to the according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter VI). In the Lalitavistara the bodhivṛkṣadevatās are four in number: Veṇu, Valgu, Sumanas and Ojāpati. In the same place, there is a detailed description of the bodhi tree.

2) Sumanas (सुमनस्) (also called Sumana or Karṇasumana) is the name of a Buddhist Bhikṣu according to chapter XLV.—Accordingly, “the Bhikṣu Karṇasumana, in a previous lifetime, saw the stūpa of the Buddha Vipaśyin and gave it the sumanā flower that he was wearing behind his ear. As a result of this, for eighty-one kalpas he enjoyed happiness among gods and men and, in his last lifetime, he had behind his ear a sumanā flower the perfume of which filled the whole house; this is why he was called Karṇasumana. Then, disgusted with the world, he went forth from home and obtained the Bodhi of the Arhats”.

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Sumanas in Jainism glossary... « previous · [S] · next »

Sumanas (सुमनस्) refers to a species of Graiveyaka gods, who are in turn a subclass of the Kalpātīta gods, according to Jain cosmological texts in both the Śvetāmbara and Digambara tradition. It is also known by the name Somanasa. The Kalpātīta (those born beyond heavens) represent a sub-species of the Vaimānika gods, which in turn represents the fourth main classification of devas (gods).

The Graiveyakas (eg., the Sumanas) do not bind karmans, are 1-sensed class of beings and have an immovable body, warm splendour, cold lustre, animal state of existence, ānupūrvī and āyus.

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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