Sumanasa, Sumānasa: 5 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Sumanasa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (S) next»] — Sumanasa in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Sumanasa (सुमनस).—One of the seven major mountains in Śālmalidvīpa, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 89. These mountains are big, yellow in colour and filled with gold. Śālmalidvīpa is one of the seven islands (dvīpa), ruled over by Dyutimān, one of the ten sons of Priyavrata, who is the son of Svāyambhuva Manu, who was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being.

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1a) Sumanasa (सुमनस).—A son of Ūru (Kuru, Viṣṇu-purāṇa).*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 36. 108; Matsya-purāṇa 4. 43; Viṣṇu-purāṇa I. 13. 6.

1b) A gaṇa of the IV Sāvarṇa Manu: includes 33 Tuṣita gods.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 1. 83-7.

1c) One of the five deva gaṇas of the epoch of Ṛthu Sāvarṇa; a mind-born son of Brahmā with ten branches.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 100. 87.

1d) A group of ten gods of the XII epoch of Manu.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa III. 2. 34.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 4: The celestial beings (deva)

Sumanasa (सुमनस) is one of the nine graiveyakas: a subclasses of kalpātītas (born beyond heaven), itself a division of empyrean celestial beings (vaimānika) according to the 2nd-century Tattvārthasūtra 4.19. The living beings residing in the vimānas are called the empyrean gods (vaimānika) and represents one of the four classes of Devas.

The nava-graiveyakas (eg., Sumanasa) are the three layered residences above the sixteenth heaven (kalpa) where Ahamindra deities reside. Which thought-colourations are there in Graivaiyaka, Anudiśa and Anuttara gods? They have pure white thought-colouration.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous (S) next»] — Sumanasa in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

sumānasa : (adj.) joyful.

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sumānasa (सुमानस):—[=su-mānasa] [from su > su-ma] mfn. good-minded, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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