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Pallava, aka: Pallavā; 9 Definition(s)

Introduction

Pallava means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Nāṭyaśāstra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Pallava (पल्लव) refers to a gesture (āṅgika) made with ‘dance hands’ (nṛttahasta), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. The hands (hasta) form a part of the human body which represents one of the six major limbs (aṅga) used in dramatic performance. With these limbs are made the various gestures (āṅgika), which form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya).

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Pallava is one of the saṃyutta-hastāni (Twenty-seven combined Hands).

Source: archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)

Pallava (पल्लव).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made with dance-hands (nṛttahasta);—(Instructions): The two Patāka hands joined at the wrist. The Dance-hands are to be used in forming Karaṇas.

Source: archive.org: Natya ShastraNāṭyaśāstra book cover
context information

Nāṭyaśāstra (नाट्यशास्त्र, natya-shastra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition of performing arts, (e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nāṭya) and poetic works (kāvya).

Purāṇa

Pallavā (पल्लवा).—Name of a river (nadī) situated near the seven great mountains on the western side of mount Naiṣadha, according to the Varāhapurāṇa chapter 83. These settlements consume the water flowing from these seven great mountains (Viśākha, Kambala, Jayanta, Kṛṣṇa, Harita, Aśoka and Vardhamāna). Niṣadha (Naiṣadha) is one of the seven mountains located in Jambūdvīpa, ruled over by Āgnīdhra, a grandson of Svāyambhuva Manu, who was created by Brahmā, who was in turn created by Nārāyaṇa, the unknowable all-pervasive primordial being.

The Varāhapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 24,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 10th century. It is composed of two parts and Sūta is the main narrator.

Source: Wisdom Library: Varāha-purāṇa

Pallava (पल्लव).—A southern tribe.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 114. 40; Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 16. 47.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana IndexPurāṇa book cover
context information

The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

A Damila chief, ally of Kulasekhara. Cv.lxxvii.55, 73.

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

Pali

pallava : (m.) a young leaf; sprout; name a country.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Pallava, (nt.) (cp. Class Sk. pallaka) a sprout J. I, 250; II, 161. See also phallava. (Page 442)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English DictionaryPali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

India history and geogprahy

The Pallavas should be considered as a power who enriched that tradition by incorporating foreign influences from other equally vital centres of Dravidian art at Amaravati, Nagarjunakonda, Badami and Vengi.

Source: Early Chola Temples: Sculpture: stone
context information

The history and geography of India includes names of areas, cities, countries and other regions of India, as well as historical dynasties, rulers, tribes and various local traditions, languages and festivals. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom but primarely encourages the path of Dharma, incorporated into religions such as Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

Relevant definitions

Search found 70 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Shalipallava
Śālipallava (शालिपल्लव, “rice-sprig”).—Symbolizes bounty of nature, fecund...
Shakti
Śakti (शक्ति) is the name of a Brāhman mentioned in the Pallava grant of king Śivaskandavarman....
Rudrasharman
Rudraśarman (रुद्रशर्मन्) is the name of a Brāhman who, after he became a householder, gave bir...
Desha
Deśa (देश, “place”) refers to one of the six factors through which positive ethical precepts (r...
Bhati
Bhati refers to one of the thirty-six Rajput clans, according to various inscriptions and liter...
Mathara
During the reign of Bimbisara, a Mathara Brahmana of Nalada village (Nalanda) visited his court...
Mana
Māna (मान).—There is a pass known as Māna Pass and it lies higher up in the Himālaya range, bey...
Bhatti
Bhaṭṭi (भट्टि) is the name of a Brāhman mentioned in the Pallava grant of king Śivaskandavarman...
Satti
Satti (सत्ति) is the name of a Brāhman mentioned in the Pallava grant of king Śivaskandavarman....
Ela
Elā (एला).—The important subgenre of song known as elā (“cardamon”) provides another opportunit...
Kanci
Kāñcī (काञ्ची) or Kāñcīpura is now represented by Conjeevaram on the river Palar, forty-three m...
Lalita
1a) Lalita (ललित, “sportiveness”).—One of the 108 karaṇas (minor dance movement) mentioned in t...
Panjara
Pañjara (पञ्जर, “cage”) refers to a representation of a pavilion with a nāsī as ...
Ahara
Āhāra (आहार) refers to an “administrative district”.—The most common designation of an administ...
Viripara
Viripara.—The Mydavōlu plates issued by Śivaskandavarman, while he was still a Yuvamahārāja, in...

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