Palli, Pallī: 15 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Palli means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Jainism, Prakrit, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

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In Hinduism

Vastushastra (architecture)

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions (vastu)

Pallī (पल्ली).—The Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra 1.18.6 by king Bhojadeva, an eleventh century work, defines Pallī thus: “Where Pulindas live building their huts with leafs, branches and stones etc. is called Pallī and a small Pallī is called Pallīkā”.

Vastushastra book cover
context information

Vastushastra (वास्तुशास्त्र, vāstuśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian science (shastra) of architecture (vastu), dealing with topics such architecture, sculpture, town-building, fort building and various other constructions. Vastu also deals with the philosophy of the architectural relation with the cosmic universe.

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India history and geography

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions

Pallī (पल्ली) refers to a name-ending for place-names mentioned in the Gupta inscriptions (reigned from 3rd century CE). The suffix—palli, pallī, pallaka or its diminutive pallikā is derived from √ pal to go, to move. It means a small village, (esp.) a settlement of wild tribes (e.g. Triśira-pallī = Trichinopoly). Pallī has been used as meaning a den of thieves in the Uttarādhyanasūtra and other Jain canonical texts, the earliest portions of which are assigned to about 300 B.C.

Pallī is changed into:

  1. bal, Āśāpallī, Yessabal
  2. poli, as Triśirapallī (= Trishṇāpallī), Trichinopoly
  3. oli, as Ahalyapallī, Ahiroli (also Ahiāri).
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Pallī.—(IE 8-4; EI 23), ‘a hamlet’; ‘a village or its part’; often suffixed to the names of localities. Note: pallī is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

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Paḻḻi.—(SII 1, 2; SITI), Tamil; often, a Jain temple; the shrine of non-Hindu communities like the Jains, Buddhists, Christians, Muhammadans, etc.; cf. paḻḻi-ccandam, temple land; paḻḻi-grāma, a village belonging to a temple. Note: paḻḻi is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

palli (पल्लि).—f S The house-lizard. Popularly pāla.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

palli (पल्लि).—f The house-lizard. Popularly pāla.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Palli (पल्लि) or Pallī (पल्ली).—f.

1) A small village; पल्लीघोषान् समृद्धांश्च बहुगोकुलसंकुलान् (pallīghoṣān samṛddhāṃśca bahugokulasaṃkulān) (apaśyat) Mb.12.325.2; also a settlement of wild tribes.

2) A hut.

3) A house, station.

4) A city or town (at the end of names of towns); as त्रिशिर- पल्ली (triśira- pallī) (Trichinopoly).

5) A house-lizard.

6) A creeping-plant.

Derivable forms: palliḥ (पल्लिः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Palli (पल्लि).—f.

(-lliḥ) 1. A small village. 2. Any village. 3. A house. 4. A number of houses. 5. Any place or station. 6. A house-lizard: see palla.

Palli can also be spelled as Pallī (पल्ली).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Palli (पल्लि).—[feminine] a small village, [especially] a settlement of wild tribes.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Pallī (पल्ली):—[from palla > pall] a f. See below.

2) Palli (पल्लि):—[from pall] a f. a small village, ([especially]) a settlement of wild tribes, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] a hut, house, [ib.]

4) Pallī (पल्ली):—[from pall] b f. a small village etc. (= palli), [Kathāsaritsāgara]

5) [v.s. ...] a hut, house, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] a city ([especially] ifc., in Name of towns e.g. triśira-p, = Trichinopoly)

7) [v.s. ...] a [particular] measure of grain, [Kātyāyana-śrauta-sūtra [Scholiast or Commentator]]

8) [v.s. ...] a small house-lizard, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

9) Palli (पल्लि):—b pallī See under √pall.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Palli (पल्लि):—(lliḥ) 2. f. A small village; a house; a place; a house lizard.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Palli (पल्लि) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Palli.

[Sanskrit to German]

Palli in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Pallī (पल्ली):—(nf) a village; hamlet; see [paralī] (under [paralā]).

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Prakrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary

Palli (पल्लि) in the Prakrit language is related to the Sanskrit word: Palli.

context information

Prakrit is an ancient language closely associated with both Pali and Sanskrit. Jain literature is often composed in this language or sub-dialects, such as the Agamas and their commentaries which are written in Ardhamagadhi and Maharashtri Prakrit. The earliest extant texts can be dated to as early as the 4th century BCE although core portions might be older.

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