Patha, aka: Pāṭhā, Pāṭha, Paṭha; 16 Definition(s)

Introduction

Patha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

1) Pāṭhā (पाठा) is a Sanskrit word referring to Cissampelos pareira (velvetleaf), a species of flowering plant from the Menispermaceae family. Certain plant parts of Pāṭhā are eaten as a vegetable (śāka), according to Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Āyurvedic work. The plant is therefore part of the Śākavarga group of medicinal plants, referring to the “group of vegetables/pot-herbs”. Caraka defined such groups (vargas) based on the dietic value of the plant. The word Pāṭhā is derived from Pāṭha, which means “recitation” or “recital”. It is derived from the root paṭh.

According to the Mādhavacikitsā (7th-century Āyurvedic work), this plant (Pāṭhā) is mentioned as a medicine used for the treatment of all major fevers, as described in the Jvaracikitsā (or “the treatment of fever”) chapter.

According to the Rājanighaṇṭu (verses 6.119-121), Pāṭhā has the following synonyms: Ambaṣṭhā, Ambaṣṭhikā, Prācīnā, Pāpacelikā, Pāṭhikā, Sthāpanī, Śreyasī, Vṛddhikarṇikā, Ekāṣṭhīlā, Kucailī, Dīpanī, Varatiktakā, Tiktapuṣpā, Bṛhattikta, Dīpanī, Triśirā, Vṛkī, Mālavī, Varā, Devī and Vṛttaparṇī. The Rājanighaṇṭu is a 13th-century Āurvedic encyclopedia.

Properties according to the Carakasaṃhitā: The vegetables of Pāṭha alleviate three doṣas and are constipating.

Properties according to the Rājanighaṇṭu: Pāṭhā is bitter, heavy (guru) and hot. It relieves the vāta-pitta-jvara (fever due to vāta-pitta). It helps in uniting the fractures (bhagna-sandhāna-kṛt). It is useful in burning sensations, diarrhoea and colic.

Botanical description: It is a climber shrub with pubsescent leaves on both surfaces and small yellowish flowers (male and female separate), grows abunduntly throughout India. Its two varieties, Laghupāṭhā and Rājapāṭhā) are common. Rājapāṭhā is identified as Cyclea peltata, male and female climbers are separate.

2) Pāṭhā (पाठा) is a Sanskrit word referring to the Cyclea peltata (“pata root”), a species of flowering plant from the Menispermaceae family. It is also known as Pāṭhī in the Hindi language or as Pāṭavaḷḷi in the Malayalam language. It is used throughout Āyurvedic literature such as the Caraka-saṃhitā and the Suśruta-saṃhitā.

3) Paṭha (पठ):—Another name for Padmaka (Prunus majestica), a species of medicinal plant and used in the treatment of fever (jvara), as described in the Jvaracikitsā (or “the treatment of fever”) which is part of the 7th-century Mādhavacikitsā, a Sanskrit classical work on Āyurveda.

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany
Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Pāṭha (पाठ) is a Sanskrit word, identified with Stephania hernandifolia (Kashmir tree) by various scholars in their translation of the Śukranīti. This tree is mentioned as having thorns, and should therefore be considered as wild. The King shoud place such trees in forests (not in or near villages). He should nourish them by stoole of goats, sheep and cows, water as well as meat. Note that Stephania hernandifolia is possibly a synonym of Stephania japonica (snake vine).

The following is an ancient Indian horticultural recipe for the nourishment of such trees:

According to Śukranīti 4.4.110-112: “The powder of the dungs of goats and sheep, the powder of Yava (barley), Tila (seeds), beef as well as water should be kept together (undisturbed) for seven nights. The application of this water leads very much to the growth in flowers and fruits of all trees (such as pāṭha).”

Source: Wisdom Library: Dharma-śāstra
Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

1) Pāṭha (पाठ).—Recital of a sacred Vedic or Sastra work; the original recital of an authoritative text;

2) Pāṭha.—The various artificial ways or methods of such a recital; c.g. पदपाठ, क्रमपाठ (padapāṭha, kramapāṭha) etc. in the case of Vedic Literature:

3) Pāṭha.—An original recital such as the सुत्रपाठ, धातुपाठ, गणपाठ, वार्तिकपाठ (sutrapāṭha, dhātupāṭha, gaṇapāṭha, vārtikapāṭha) and परिभाषापाठ (paribhāṣāpāṭha) in the case of the several systems of Sanskrit Grammar; the five Paathas are called पञ्चपाठी (pañcapāṭhī);

4) Pāṭha.—Recitation; cf. नान्तरेण पाठं स्वरा अनुबन्धा वा शक्या विज्ञातुम् (nāntareṇa pāṭhaṃ svarā anubandhā vā śakyā vijñātum) M. Bh. on P.I.3.1 Vaart. 13;

5) Pāṭha.—Reading, variant: cf. चूर्णादीनि अप्राण्युपग्रहादिति सूत्रस्य पाठान्तरम् (cūrṇādīni aprāṇyupagrahāditi sūtrasya pāṭhāntaram) Kaas. on P.V.2.134.

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar
context information

Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Pāṭhā (पाठा) is the name of a plant mentioned in connection with a Tantric ceremony, according to the Vajraḍākatantra chapter 38.—Five techniques to please Dūtīs as well as the Yogin himself and to enlarge a Yogin’s gentials are introduced. Various kinds of woods and plants in addition to honey and butter are utilized for this purpose. [...] The mixture of aśvagandhā, pāṭhā, kaṭurohiṇī and sap of arka-tree is effective for growing his genitals.

Source: academia.edu: A Critical Study of the Vajraḍākamahātantrarāja (II)
Tibetan Buddhism book cover
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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India history and geogprahy

Patha (पथ) refers to a name-ending for place-names mentioned in the Gupta inscriptions (reigned from 3rd century CE). Patha means a “way”, “path”, a “road” or “route”. In the Samarāṅgaṇasūtradhāra we find the word janṅhā-patha (foot-path). The suffix ‘patha’ has been used as early as the later Vedic period. Originally patha meant ‘a path’, ‘a road’ but later on it came to denote ‘a country’. Even now-a-days, the suffix ‘road’ is used for inhabitations and localities.

Source: archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions

Patha (पथ) refers to an “administrative unit”.—Side by side with the raṭṭha or rāṣṭra we find another group of administrative units whose names end in -patha. An early Pallava inscription refers to the Andhrāpatha in charge of an official (vāpata or Vyāpṛta) at Dhaṃñakaḍa, usually identified with Amarāvatī or some neighbouring place. Epigraphs of about the same age also mention Paiṭhāṇa-patha (apparently connected with Paiṭhaṇ on the Godāvarī), Śvetapatha, and Kāchu-patha (Kācupatha).

Source: Early History Of The Deccan Pts.1 To 6: Principal Administrative Divisions from the Rise of the Sātavāhanas

Patha is a term designating ‘road’, used in the inscriptions of Andhra Pradesh.—These two appellations (patha and marga) are synonymous, standing for trade-communication routes or village roads. Understands pathaka as a term similar to a pargana of later days. Divisions with these appellations occur very rarely in Andhra Pradesh. Ane-marga was a division of the Kalyana Chalukyas and Ongeru-marga-vishaya was that of the Eastern Chalukyas. The Mayidavolu plates of the Pallava king Sivaskandavarman refer to Andhra-patha which might mean not an administrative unit, but the entire Andhra region ruled by the Pallavas. In Madhya Pradesh under the Vakatakas and the Sarabhapuriyas there were a large number of marga divisions.

Source: Shodhganga: A study of place names of Nalgonda district

Patha is the name of a city mentioned in the “Semrā copper-plate grant of Paramardideva” (1162 A.C). Patha, as read by Cartellieri in ll. 8-9, has been identified by him with the modern place of the same name lying about 6 kms. east of Berwārā.

These plates (mentioning Patha) were found at Semrā: a town in the Chatarpur District of the Bundelkhand region (formerly the state of Bijāwar) of Madhya Pradesh. They were issued by Paramardideva to record the confirmation of a grant, from his camp at Sonasara, for the sake of the increase of his own and his parent’s merit and fame.

Source: What is India: Inscriptions of the Candellas, Kacchapaghatas, Pala, etc.

Pātha.—(IE 8-6; IA 11), a land measure regarded as equal to 240 square feet. Note: pātha is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Patha in Pali glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

patha : (m.) path; way; road (in cpds.) range of, e.g. gaṇanapatha = range of calculation. || pāṭha (m.) a passage; text reading.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Pāṭha, (fr. paṭh) reading, text-reading; passage of a text, text. Very frequent in Commentaries with phrase “ti pi pāṭho, ” i.e. “so is another reading, ” e.g. KhA 78, 223; SnA 43 (°ṃ vikappeti), 178, 192, 477; PvA. 25 (pamāda° careless text), 48, 58, 86 and passim. (Page 451)

— or —

Patha, (of path, Ved. pathi with the 3 bases pathi, path° and panth°, of which only the last two have formed independent nouns, viz. patha and pantha (q. v.)) 1. path, road, way D. I, 63; Sn. 176 (Loc. pathe), 385, 540, 868; Nd2 485 B (+pantha, in explanation of magga); J. I, 308 (Loc. pathe); II, 39; VI, 525 (Abl. pathā); Th. 1, 64; Pug. 22, 57; Mhvs 21, 24 (pathe); 36, 93 (Loc. pathi, see Geiger, Gr. § 89); Sdhp. 241.—2. Very frequent as —°, where it is sometimes pleonastic, and acts in the function of an abstract formation in °tā or °ttaṃ (cp. similar use of anta: see anta1 5; and pada: see pada 3), e.g. anila° (air) J. IV, 119; anupariyāya° A. IV, 107; ādicca° (path of the sun, sky) DhA. III, 177; ummagga° S. I, 193; kamma° DhA. I, 36; gaṇana° (range of) calculation Miln. 20; cakkhu° J. IV, 403 (=cakkhūnaṃ etaṃ nāmaṃ C.); catummahā° A. III, 28, 42, 394; dve° Vv 5317; nakkhatta° Dh. 208; yañña° (=yañña) Nd2 524; yogga° A. III, 122; rajā° S. II, 219; rāga° (sensuality) S. IV, 70; vacana° (way of saying, speech) Vv 6317 (=vacana VvA. 262), etc. See also cakkhu°, ñeyya°, dveḷhā°, manussa°, yañña°, vāda°, sagga°, hattha°; der. pātheyya.—See also byappatha.—apatha where there is no way or road, wrong way J. II, 287; ThA. 255; VvA. 337.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

1) Patha (पथ).—m S A road, way, path.

patha (पथ).—f (Commonly pata) Mercantile character or repute, credit.

2) pāṭha (पाठ).—f (pṛṣṭha S) The back. Pr. pāṭhīvara mārāvēṃ pōṭāvara mārūṃ nayē Whip the back, dont clip the belly. Pr. āpalī pāṭha āpaṇāsa disata nāhīṃ Said of matters happening before one's eyes, yet unobserved--of matters close at hand yet unseen or unknown. 2 fig. The back (hinder or under side) of a thing gen. 3 fig. Aid, support, backing. v . 4 fig. Surface or face (as of the earth, ocean, a table or any expanse). 5 Rind, peel, the back, coat, or exterior integument. 6 (As ḍōī Head is made to signify a generation generally, so pāṭha Back, quasi at or upon the back of, is taken to denote a generation with respect to the goat.) A female kid. pāṭhacā Succeeding or subsequent to; that follows after;--used of a child with reference to its brother or sister immediately before it. Also pāṭhalā. 2 That has sought the shelter and protection of. Pr. pōṭacā dyāvā pāṭhacā dēūṃ nayē Give one's own child, but give not up a refugee.

pāṭha (पाठ).—a (S) That has been committed to memory; known by heart. Ex. hā grantha malā pāṭha āhē. puḍhēṃ pāṭha māgēṃ sapāṭa Said of a person ever reading and conning and anon clean forgetting.

3) pāṭhā (पाठा).—m (Poetry. For pāḍā) Detail or minutiæ of; lengthy catalogue, account, or story of. Ex. vācē harīnāmācā pāṭhā || vyāpāra khōṭā na karavē ||.

4) pātha (पाथ).—f pāntha f C (Commonly pānta q. v.) A line or row &c. pāntha a S Relating to the road or way; a wayfarer or traveler.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

1) Patha (पथ).—m A road, way, path.

2) pāṭha (पाठ).—m Reading the Vedas. Reading in general. A lesson. A reading, a variation of copies. pāṭha karaṇēṃ To commit

pāṭha (पाठ).—a That has been committed to memory; known by heart. Ex. hā grantha malā pāṭha āhē. puḍhēṃ pāṭha māgē sapāṭa Said of a person ever reading and cunning and anon clean forgetting.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Paṭha (पठ).—Reading, reciting.

Derivable forms: paṭhaḥ (पठः).

--- OR ---

Patha (पथ).—A way, road; reach, course (at the end of comp.); पाणिस्पर्शाक्षमाभ्यां मृजितपथरुजो यो हरीन्द्रानुजाभ्याम् (pāṇisparśākṣamābhyāṃ mṛjitapatharujo yo harīndrānujābhyām) Bhāg.9.1.4.

Derivable forms: pathaḥ (पथः).

--- OR ---

Pāṭha (पाठ).—[paṭh-bhāve ghañ]

1) Reciting, recitation, repeating.

2) Reading, perusal, study.

3) Studying or reciting. the Vedas (brahmayajña), one of the five daily Yajñas or sacrifices to be performed by Brāhmaṇas.

4) A particular method of reciting the text of the Veda (of which there are five:-saṃhitā, pada, krama, jaṭā and ghana).

5) The text of a book, a reading, variant; अत्र गन्धवद् गन्धमादनम् इति आगन्तुकः पाठः । प्राचीनपाठस्तु सुगन्धिर्गन्धमादनः इति पुल्लिङ्गान्तः (atra gandhavad gandhamādanam iti āgantukaḥ pāṭhaḥ | prācīnapāṭhastu sugandhirgandhamādanaḥ iti pulliṅgāntaḥ) Malli. on Ku.6.46.

Derivable forms: pāṭhaḥ (पाठः).

--- OR ---

Pātha (पाथ).—[pīyate'daḥ pā-karmaṇi tha]

1) Fire.

2) The sun.

-tham Water.

Derivable forms: pāthaḥ (पाथः).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Patha (पथ).—nt. (in Sanskrit m.), way: marutpathāni LV 117.9 (verse). See also Laṅkā-patha.

--- OR ---

Pāṭha (पाठ).—(-pāṭha), m. (to paṭh-; compare Sanskrit pāṭhaka), reader (other-wise only n. act.): vedasupinapāṭhā ye (so divide) LV 57.1 (verse); śāstrapāṭhān 6 (verse).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Patha (पथ).—m.

(-thaḥ) A road. E. path to go, aff. ac.

--- OR ---

Pāṭha (पाठ).—m.

(-ṭhaḥ) 1. Studying the Vedas scriptures, considered as one of the five great sacraments of the Hindus. 2. Reading, perusal or study in general. f.

(-ṭhā) A plant, commonly Akanadi. E. paṭh to read, aff. bhāve ghañ.

--- OR ---

Pātha (पाथ).—m.

(-thaḥ) 1. The sun. 2. Fire. n.

(-thaṃ) Water. E. to drink, and thak aff.; the more usual form however is pītha.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 411 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Iryapatha
Iryāpatha (इर्यापथ) or Iryā or Iryāvant.—semi-MIndic spelling for īry°, q.v.--- OR --- Īryāpath...
Dakshinapatha
Dakṣiṇāpatha (दक्षिणापथ).—n. (-thaṃ) 1. The south. 2. Southern road or course. 3. Deccan. E. da...
Kupatha
Kupatha (कुपथ) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.59.25, I.65) and represents one o...
Uttarapatha
Uttarāpatha (उत्तरापथ).—m. (-thaḥ) The north, a northern road or direction. E. uttara and pathi...
Supatha
Supatha (सुपथ).—m. (-thaḥ) 1. A good road. 2. Good conduct. 3. Good course. E. su good, pathin ...
Mahapatha
Mahāpatha (महापथ).—m. (-thaḥ) 1. The principal path or entrance to a town or house. &c., a ...
Catushpatha
Catuppatha: a fourways J. IV, 460;
Pathashala
Pāṭhaśālā (पाठशाला).—f. (-lā) A college, a school. E. pāṭha study, śālā a hall.
Devapatha
Devapatha (देवपथ).—f. (-thaḥ) Heaven, the firmament, the celestial path or way. E. deva a deity...
Vaṇikpatha
Vaṇik-patha.—‘trade-route’; a revenue term. See Ghoshal, H. Rev. Syst., pp. 79-80. Note: vaṇik-...
Kramapatha
Kramapāṭha (क्रमपाठ).—A method of teaching the Vedas. It is due to the insistence on strict adh...
Tripatha
Tripatha (त्रिपथ).—n. (-thaṃ) 1. A place where three roads meet. 2. Three ways or paths. E. tri...
Ghantapatha
Ghaṇṭāpatha (घण्टापथ).—m. (-thaḥ) The chief road through a village, a highway. E. ghaṇṭā a bell...
Satpatha
Satpatha (सत्पथ).—m. (-thaḥ) 1. A good road. 2. Correct or virtuous conduct, doctrine, &c. ...
Dvipatha
Dvipatha (द्विपथ).—n. (-thaṃ) A place where two roads meet. E. dvi two, pathin a road.

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