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Palaka, aka: Pālaka; 5 Definition(s)

Introduction

Palaka means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purāṇa

1a) Pālaka (पालक).—The son of Pṛadyota and father of Viśākhayupa.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa XII. 1. 3.

1b) A son of Bālaka, ruled for 28 years*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 74. 125; Matsya-purāṇa 272. 3. Vāyu-purāṇa 99. 312.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana IndexPurāṇa book cover
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The Purāṇas (पुराण, purana) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahāpurāṇas total over 400,000 ślokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Kathā (narrative stories)

Pālaka (पालक) is the name of one of the two sons of Caṇḍamahāsena and his wife Aṅgāravatī, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 11. Pālaka had a brother named Gopālaka. Caṇḍamahāsena was previously known by the name Mahāsena and was the son of Jayasena, son of Mahendravarman (king of Ujjayinī). Aṅgāravatī was the daughter of Aṅgāraka, who broke the chariot of Caṇḍamahāsena in the form of a fierce boar and fled into a cavern, but was later slain by Caṇḍamahāsena.

In Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 13, Pālaka and Gopālaka were pursuing Udayana (king of Vatsa), who escaped from Caṇḍamahāsena together Vasantaka, Yaugandharāyaṇa, Vāsavadattā and Kāñcanamālā.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’) is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: KathāsaritsāgaraKathā book cover
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Kathās (कथा) are special kind of Sanskrit literature: they are a kind of a mix between Itihāsa (historical legends) and Mahākāvya (epic poetry). Some Kathās reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of the historical deeds of the Gods, sages and heroes.

In Buddhism

Pali

pālaka : (m.) a guard; keeper; protector.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Palaka, (cp. late Sk. pala, flesh, meat) a species of plant J. VI, 564. (Page 439)

— or —

Pālaka, (-°) (fr. ) a guardian, herdsman M. I, 79; S. III, 154; A. IV, 127; J. III, 444. (Page 455)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English DictionaryPali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

1) Pālaka (पालक) refers to a class of piśāca deities according to the Śvetāmbara tradition of Jainism, while Digambara does not recognize this class. The piśācas refer to a category of vyantaras gods which represents one of the four classes of celestial beings (devas).

The deities such as the Pālakas are defined in ancient Jain cosmological texts such as the Saṃgrahaṇīratna in the Śvetāmbara tradition or the Tiloyapaṇṇati by Yativṛṣabha (5th century) in the Digambara tradition.

2) Pālaka (पालक) refers to a type of vegetable (śāka), according to the Vyākhyāprajñapti 7.3.276. It is also known as Pālaṃka. Different kinds of vegetables were grown in the vegetable gardens (kaccha / kakṣa). The consumption of vegetables was considered essential for digesting food according to the Niśīthacūrṇi. The Jaina texts forbid the consumption of certain vegetables as it leads to killing of insects.

The Vyākhyāprajñapti, also known as the Bhagavatīsūtra contains a compilation of 36,000 questions answered by Mahāvīra and dates to at least the 1st century A.D. The Niśīthacūrṇi by Jinadāsa is a 7th century commentary on the Niśthasūtra and deals with Jain medical knowledge.

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Relevant definitions

Search found 14 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Dvarapalaka
Dvārapālaka (द्वारपालक).—Dvārapālakas are the door-keepers of the temples, and sculptures repre...
Sharirapalaka
Śarīrapālakā (शरीरपालका).—Besides the parivāra-devatās mentioned above, the temple of ...
Pishaca
Piśāca (पिशाच) refers to a class of demons and represents a type of Ādhibhautika pain, accordin...
Mahasena
Mahāsena (महासेन) is the name of a deity to be invoked in a certain ritual, according to the Mā...
Gopalaka
Gopālaka (गोपालक) is the name of one of the two sons of Caṇḍamahāsena and his wife Aṅgāravatī, ...
Vaccha
1) Vaccha, 2 (=rukkha, fr. vṛkṣa) a tree; only in mālā° an ornamental plant Vin. II, 12; III,...
Vasavadatta
Vāsavadattā (वासवदत्ता).—The title of the Vāsavadattā of Subandhu, the oldest romantic novel in...
Vacchaka
Vacchaka, (Demin. fr. vaccha1) a (little) calf J. III, 444; V, 93, 433; Miln. 282 (as go-vacc...
Pradyota
Pradyota (प्रद्योत) is the name of the king of Magadha who opposed king Udayana, according to t...
Paveni
Paveṇi, (f.) (pa+veṇi; cp. late Sk. praveṇi in meanings 1 & 2) 1. a braid of hair, i.e. the ha...
Anupalaka
Anupālaka, (adj.) (anu + pālaka) guarding, preserving Sdhp.474. (Page 39)
Candamahasena
Caṇḍamahāsena (चण्डमहासेन).—Name of a King who was previously known as Mahāsena, accor...
Vishakhayupa
1a) Viśākhayūpa (विशाखयूप).—A son of Pālaka and father of Rājaka: ruled for 50 years (53 ...
Vaccha or bandha sutta
1) Vaccha, 2 (=rukkha, fr. vṛkṣa) a tree; only in mālā° an ornamental plant Vin. II, 12; III,...

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