Palaka, aka: Pālaka; 11 Definition(s)

Introduction

Palaka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana

Palaka in Purana glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

Pālaka (पालक).—A son born to the King Caṇḍamahāsena of his wife Aṅgāravatī. Aṅgāravatī got two sons. The other son was named Gopālaka. (Kathāmukhalambaka, Kathāsaritsāgara).

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Pālaka (पालक).—The son of Pṛadyota and father of Viśākhayupa.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa XII. 1. 3.

1b) A son of Bālaka, ruled for 28 years*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 74. 125; Matsya-purāṇa 272. 3. Vāyu-purāṇa 99. 312.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Katha (narrative stories)

Palaka in Katha glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

Pālaka (पालक) is the name of one of the two sons of Caṇḍamahāsena and his wife Aṅgāravatī, from Ujjayinī, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 11. Pālaka had a brother named Gopālaka. Caṇḍamahāsena was previously known by the name Mahāsena and was the son of Jayasena, son of Mahendravarman (king of Ujjayinī). Aṅgāravatī was the daughter of Aṅgāraka, who broke the chariot of Caṇḍamahāsena in the form of a fierce boar and fled into a cavern, but was later slain by Caṇḍamahāsena.

Pālaka (पालक) is also mentioned in the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 112. Accordingly, as Suratamañjarī said to Hariśikha: “... there is in Ujjayinī a fortunate king named Pālaka, he has a son, a prince named Avantivardhana; by him I was married; and this night, when I was asleep on the top of the palace, and my husband was asleep also, I was carried off by this villain”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Pālaka, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
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Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

1) Pālaka (पालक) refers to a class of piśāca deities according to the Śvetāmbara tradition of Jainism, while Digambara does not recognize this class. The piśācas refer to a category of vyantaras gods which represents one of the four classes of celestial beings (devas).

The deities such as the Pālakas are defined in ancient Jain cosmological texts such as the Saṃgrahaṇīratna in the Śvetāmbara tradition or the Tiloyapaṇṇati by Yativṛṣabha (5th century) in the Digambara tradition.

2) Pālaka (पालक) refers to a type of vegetable (śāka), according to The Vyākhyāprajñapti 7.3.276. It is also known as Pālaṃka. Different kinds of vegetables were grown in the vegetable gardens (kaccha / kakṣa). The consumption of vegetables was considered essential for digesting food according to the Niśīthacūrṇi. The Jaina texts forbid the consumption of certain vegetables as it leads to killing of insects.

The Vyākhyāprajñapti, also known as the Bhagavatīsūtra contains a compilation of 36,000 questions answered by Mahāvīra and dates to at least the 1st century A.D. The Niśīthacūrṇi by Jinadāsa is a 7th century commentary on the Niśthasūtra and deals with Jain medical knowledge.

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Palaka dynasty according to Harivamsa Purana and Tiloyapannati.—Starting from the epoch of Mahavira nirvana (1189 BCE), Palaka ruled for 60 years, Vishaya kings for 150 years, Murundas for 40 years, Pushpamitra for 30 years, Vasumitra & Agnimitra for 60 years, Gandhavvaya or Rasabha kings for 100 years, Naravahana for 40 years, Bhattubanas for 242 years and Guptas for 231 years.

Source: academia.edu: The epoch of the Mahavira-nirvana

Pālaka (पालक) is the name of a village visited by Mahāvīra during his twelfth year of spiritual-exertion.—From Meḍhiyāgrāma he reached Kauśāmbī. After leaving Kauśāmbī, the Lord arrived at Campā city after passing through the villages Sumaṅgala, Suchettā, Pālaka etc. After four months fast, he completed the 12th cāturmāsa at the sacrificial hall of the Brahmin Svātidatta. Leaving that place the Lord arrived at Jambhiyagrāma.

Source: HereNow4u: Lord Śrī Mahāvīra
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Palaka in Pali glossary... « previous · [P] · next »

pālaka : (m.) a guard; keeper; protector.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Palaka, (cp. late Sk. pala, flesh, meat) a species of plant J. VI, 564. (Page 439)

— or —

Pālaka, (-°) (fr. ) a guardian, herdsman M. I, 79; S. III, 154; A. IV, 127; J. III, 444. (Page 455)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

palaka (पलक) [or पलख, palakha].—m n ( P) A twinkling of the eye (as a measure of time); a moment, an instant.

--- OR ---

paḷakā (पळका).—a (paḷaṇēṃ) Fleet, swift, quick in running. 2 Of a runaway disposition.

--- OR ---

paḷakā (पळका).—m (pōḷaṇēṃ) The skin that peels off from a burn.

--- OR ---

pālaka (पालक) [or ख, kha].—m (Poetry.) A cradle. Ex. suvāsiṇī miḷavūni sakaḷā || ghātalēṃ bāḷa pālakhānta ||. 2 f m A vegetable, Beta Bengalensis.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

palaka (पलक) [or palakha, or पलख].—m n A twinkling of the eye, a moment.

--- OR ---

paḷakā (पळका).—a Fleet, swift. Of a runaway disposition.

--- OR ---

pālaka (पालक).—

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Pālaka (पालक).—[pāl-ṇvul]

1) A guardian, protector.

2) A prince, king, ruler, sovereign.

3) A groom, horsekeeper.

4) A horse.

5) The Chitraka tree.

6) A fosterfather.

7) Protection.

8) One who maintains or observes (as a promise &c).

-kam A spittoon.

Derivable forms: pālakaḥ (पालकः).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 53 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Gopalaka
Gopālaka (गोपालक).—A son born to Caṇḍamahāsena of his wife Aṅgāravatī. Besides Gopālaka he had ...
Dvarapalaka
Dvārapālaka (द्वारपालक).—a door-keeper, porter, warder. -paḥ Name of Viṣṇu. Derivable forms: dv...
Ajapalaka
Ajāpālaka (अजापालक).—a goatherd, See अजजीव (ajajīva) &c. Derivable forms: ajāpālakaḥ (अजापालकः)...
Kulapalaka
Kulapālaka (कुलपालक).—an orange. Derivable forms: kulapālakam (कुलपालकम्).Kulapālaka is a Sansk...
Kalyapalaka
Kalyapālaka (कल्यपालक).—a distiller. Derivable forms: kalyapālakaḥ (कल्यपालकः).Kalyapālaka is a...
Sangadi-raksha-palaka
Saṅgaḍi-rakṣā-pālaka.—(EI 6), an officer; the meaning of saṅgaḍi is uncertain. Note: saṅgaḍi-ra...
Mahishapalaka
Mahiṣapālaka (महिषपालक).—a buffalo-keeper. Derivable forms: mahiṣapālakaḥ (महिषपालकः).Mahiṣapāl...
Meshapalaka
Meṣapālaka (मेषपालक).—a shepherd. Derivable forms: meṣapālakaḥ (मेषपालकः).Meṣapālaka is a Sansk...
Prithivipalaka
Pṛthivīpālaka (पृथिवीपालक).—m., Derivable forms: pṛthivīpālakaḥ (पृथिवीपालकः).Pṛthivīpālaka is ...
Kutapalaka
Kūṭapālaka (कूटपालक).—a potter; a potter's kiln. Derivable forms: kūṭapālakaḥ (कूटपालकः).Kūṭapā...
Vishvapalaka
Viśvapālaka (विश्वपालक) is the name of an Ayurvedic recipe defined in the fourth volume of the ...
Bandhanapalaka
Bandhanapālaka (बन्धनपालक).—m. a jailor. Derivable forms: bandhanapālakaḥ (बन्धनपालकः).Bandhana...
Udyanapalaka
Udyānapālaka (उद्यानपालक).—a gardener, superintendent or keeper of a garden; उद्यानपालसामान्यमृ...
Ashvapalaka
Aśvapālaka (अश्वपालक).—a horse-groom. Derivable forms: aśvapālakaḥ (अश्वपालकः).Aśvapālaka is a ...
Dandapalaka
Daṇḍapālaka (दण्डपालक).—1) a head magistrate. 2) a door-keeper, porter. Kau. A.1.12. 3) Ns. of ...

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