Mahavira, aka: Mahāvīra, Maha-vira; 11 Definition(s)

Introduction

Mahavira means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Mahavira in Purana glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

1) Mahāvīra (महावीर).—A son of Priyavrata. Svāyambhuva Manu had two famous sons named Priyavrata and Uttānapāda. Of them, Priyavrata married Surūpā and Barhiṣmatī, the two beautiful and virtuous daughters of Viśvakarma Prajāpati. By his first wife Surūpā, Priyavrata had ten sons, namely, Agnīdhra, Idhmajihva, Yajñabāhu, Mahāvīra, Rukmaśukra, Ghṛtapṛṣṭha, Savana, Medhātithi, Vītihotra and Kavi. The youngest of his children was a daughter named Ūrjjasvatī. (Devī Bhāgavata, 8th Skandha).

2) Mahāvīra (महावीर).—Mahābhārata, Ādi Parva, Chapter 67, Verse 68, refers to a Mahāvīra, who was the re-birth of the Asura Krodhavaśa.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

Mahāvīra (महावीर).—A son of Priyavrata, remained a bachelor all through life engaged in ātmavidyā.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa V. 1. 25-6.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Mahāvīra (महावीर) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.61.55) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Mahāvīra) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Mahāvīra (महावीर) is the husband of Vāyuvegā: the name of a Ḍākinī (‘sacred girl’) presiding over Triśakuni: one of the four Upakṣetra (‘sacred spot’) present within the Vākcakra (‘circle of word’), according to the 9th-centruy Vajraḍākatantra. The Vākcakra is one of three Cakras within the Tricakra system which embodies twenty-four sacred spots or districts resided over by twenty-four Ḍākinīs whose husbands (viz., Mahāvīra) abide in one’s body in the form of twenty-four ingredients (dhātu) of one’s body.

Vāyuvegā has for her husband the hero (vīra) named Mahāvīra. She is the presiding deity of Triśakuni and the associated internal location are the ‘navel’ and the bodily ingredients (dhātu) are the ‘lungs’.

Source: academia.edu: A Critical Study of the Vajraḍākamahātantrarāja (II)

Mahāvīra (महावीर) is the name of a Vīra (hero) who, together with the Ḍākinī named Vāyuvegā forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Vajracakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the vajracakra refers to one of the four divisions of the sahaja-puṭa (‘innate layer’), situated within the padma (lotus) in the middle of the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs and Vīras [viz., Mahāvīra] each have one face and four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum and a knife; they are dark-bluish-black in color.

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala
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Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Mahavira in Jainism glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mahāvīra (महावीर):—The twenty-fourth Tīrthaṅkara (Janism recognizes 24 such teachers or Siddhas). His colour is gold (kāñcana), according to Aparājitapṛcchā (221.5-7). His height is 7 hatha (4 hatha equals 1 dhanuṣa, which equals 6 feet), thus, roughly corresponding to 3.2 meters. His emblem, or symbol, is a Lion.

Mahāvīra’s father is Siddhārtha and his mother is Triśalā according to Śvetāmbara or Priyakāriṇī according to Digambara. It is an ancient Jain practice to worship the Tīrthaṅkara’s parents in various rites, such as the pratiṣṭhāvidhi, according to the Ācāradinakara (14th work on Jain conduct written by Vardhamāna Sūri).

Source: Wisdom Library: Jainism

Mahāvīra (महावीर).—An illustrated kalpasūtra will open with the image of Mahāvīra recognizable by his symbol of lion below his throne. Mahāvīra sits in padmāsana on a throne supported by lions and elephants facing each other. It is a majestic meditating image resembling sculptural icons.

Source: Shodhganga: A cultural study on the jain western Indian illustrated manuscripts

Mahāvīra (महावीर), the 24th Tirthankara.—Mahavira was the son of Kundagrama King Siddhartha of Ikshvaku dynasty and Trishala, the sister of King Chetaka of Vajji Ganarajya. According to Guṇabhadra’s Uttarapurāṇa, Mahāvīra became a Siddha in the month of Kārttika, kṛṣṇapakśa-chaturdaśi and Svātinakśatra. Thus, Mahāvīra attained nirvāṇa on 22 nd October 1189-88 BCE, 605 years and 5 months before the commencement of the Śaka era (583 BCE) and 470 years before the commencement of the Kārttikādi Vikrama era (719-718 BCE).

Source: academia.edu: The epoch of the Mahavira-nirvana
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

Mahavira in Pali glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

mahāvīra : (m.) great hero.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mahavira in Sanskrit glossary... « previous · [M] · next »

Mahāvīra (महावीर).—

1) a great hero or warrior.

2) a lion.

3) the thunderbolt of Indra.

4) an epithet of Viṣṇu.

5) of Garuḍa.

6) of Hanumat.

7) a cuckoo.

8) a white horse.

9) a sacrificial fire.

1) a sacrificial vessel.

11) a kind of hawk. °चरितम् (caritam) Name of a celebrated drama by Bhavabhūti.

Derivable forms: mahāvīraḥ (महावीरः).

Mahāvīra is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mahā and vīra (वीर).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mahāvīra (महावीर).—m.

(-raḥ) 1. Garuda the bird, and vehicle of Vishnu. 2. A hero. 3. A lion. 4. A white horse. 5. Sacrificial fire. 6. Indra'S thunderbolt. 7. A bird, a sort of hawk. 8. The Kokila or Indian cuckoo. 9. The last and most celebrated Jina or Jaina teacher of the present who age, is supposed to have flourished in the province of Behar, in the sixth century before the Christian era. 10. Sacrificial vessel. 11. Vishnu. 12. Agni or fire. f.

(-rā) A sort of drug, commonly Kshirakakoli, and conceived to be the dried root of a species of lily. E. mahā great, and bīra hero.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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