Anna, aka: Aṇṇa, Aññā, Añña, Ānna; 12 Definition(s)

Introduction

Anna means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Anna (अन्न, “food”) includes all sorts of eatables, forming part of a common diet in ancient Kashmir (Kaśmīra) as mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa.—The term ‘anna ’ from √ad ‘to eat’ used for food in the Nīlamata, includes all sorts of eatables. Most of the references to the articles of diet occur in the Nīlamata in connection with the offerings made to the gods but it is not difficult to infer from them the food and drink of the common people because “what a man eats his gods eat”.

Source: archive.org: Nilamata Purana: a cultural and literary study

Anna (अन्न).—Gift of, the best of all; especially in a śrāddha1 annavikraya condemned.2

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 16. 3, 52-5; 68, 66; Vāyu-purāṇa 80. 55-7 (cf. rāmā. II. ch. 103).
  • 2) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 8. 44-58.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Anna or food is the basis of life. Life is sustained by the consumption of life, and this is the inherent principle of nature. And sustenance of life is the highest principle. At the same time, consumption of life defeats the same principle (for other creatures). Harming any living being is against that principle. Thus there arises the need for reconciliation between the principle of consumption and the principle of sustenance. This is explained by the concept of sacrifice.

Body is called anna-maya kosha or the sheath of food. It is the upādhi, the basis for every rite, through performance of which the purpose of life is fulfilled. The rite undertaken for sustaining the upādhi, namely consumption, is one of the most sacred and important ones. However, this means that only the consumption done with the sense of sacrifice, or with the sense of sustaining the upādhi, is considered sacred. Superfluous consumption of life, is against the principle of sustenance.

Source: Hindupedia: The Hindu Encyclopedia

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

Each;

Source: Journey to Nibbana: Patthana Dhama

'other', being of the opposite category.

-- or --

'highest knowledge', gnosis, refers to the perfect knowledge of the Saint (Arahat; s. ariya-puggala).

The following passage occurs frequently in the Suttas, when a monk indicates his attainment of Holiness (arahatta): "He makes known highest knowledge (aññam vyākaroti), thus: 'Rebirth has ceased, fulfilled is the holy life, the task is accomplished, and there is no more of this to come.' "

The 'faculty of highest knowledge' (aññ' indriya = aññā-indriya; s. indriya), however, is present in six of the eight stages of holiness, that is, beginning with the fruition of Stream-Winning (sotāpatti-phala) up to the path of Holiness (arahatta-magga).

See Dhs. (PTS) 362-364, 505, 553; Indriya Vibhanga; "Path" 162.

Source: Pali Kanon: Manual of Buddhist Terms and Doctrines
context information

Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Anna (अन्न) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, as mentioned in Svayambhūdeva’s Paumacariu (Padmacarita, Paumacariya or Rāmāyaṇapurāṇa) chapter 57ff. Svayambhū or Svayambhūdeva (8th or 9th century) was a Jain householder who probably lived in Karnataka. His work recounts the popular Rāma story as known from the older work Rāmāyaṇa (written by Vālmīki). Various chapters [mentioning Anna] are dedicated to the humongous battle whose armies (known as akṣauhiṇīs) consisted of millions of soldiers, horses and elephants, etc.

Source: archive.org: Een Kritische Studie Van Svayambhūdeva’s Paümacariu
General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

aṇṇa : (m.) water.

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anna : (nt.) food; boiled rice.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Aññā, (f.) (Sk. ājñā, = ā + jñā, cp. ājānāti) knowledge, recognition, perfect knowledge, philosophic insight, knowledge par excellence, viz. Arahantship, saving knowledge, gnosis (cp. on term Compend. 176 n. 3 and Psalms of Brethren introd. XXXIII, ) M.I, 445; S.I, 4 (sammad°), 24 (aññāya nibbuta); II, 221; V, 69, 129 (diṭṭh’eva dhamme), 133, 237; A.III, 82, 143, 192; V, 108; It.39 sq., 53, 104; Dh.75, 96; Kh VII, 11; Miln.334. — aññaṃ vyākaroti to manifest ones Arahantship (by a discourse or by mere exclamation) Vin.I, 183; S.II, 51 sq., 120; IV, 139; V, 222; J.I, 140; II, 333. See also arahatta.

—atthika desirous of higher knowledge Pv IV.114. —ārādhana the attainment of full insight M.I, 479. —indriya the faculty of perfect knowledge or of knowledge made perfect D.III, 219; S.V, 204; It.53; Pug.2; Dhs.362, 505, 552; Nett 15, 54, 60. —citta the thought of gnosis, the intention of gaining Arahantship S.II, 267; A.III, 437. —paṭivedha comprehension of insight Vin.II, 238. —vimokkha deliverance by the highest insight Sn.1105, 1107 (Nd2 19: vuccati arahatta-vimokkho). (Page 14)

— or —

Anna, (nt.) (Vedic anna, orig. pp. of adati to eat) “eating”, food, esp. boiled rice, but includes all that is eaten as food, viz. odana, kummāsa, sattu, maccha, maṃsa (rice, gruel, flour, fish, meat) Nd1 372 = 495. Anna is spelt aṇṇa in combns aparaṇṇa and pubbaṇṇa. Under dhañña (Nd2 314) are distinguished 2 kinds, viz. raw, natural cereals (pubb’aṇṇaṃ: sāli, vīhi, yava, godhūma, kaṅgu, varaka, kudrūsaka) and boiled, prepared food (apa’aṇṇaṃ: sūpeyya curry). SnA 378 (on Sn.403) expls. anna by yāgubhattâdi. — D.I, 7; A.I, 107, 132; II, 70, 85, 203; Sn.82, 240, 403, 924; J.III, 190; Pug.51; Sdhp.106, 214.

—āpa food & water Sdhp.100. —da giving food Sn.297. —pāna food & water, eating & drinking, to eat & to drink Sn.485, 487; Pv.I, 52, 82; KhA 207, 209; PvA.7, 8, 30, 31, 43. (Page 49)

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Añña, (pron.) (Vedic anya, with compar. suff. ya; Goth. anpar; Ohg. andar; formation with n analagous to those with l in Gr. a)λlos (a)λjos), Lat. alius (cp. alter), Goth. aljis Ags. elles = E. else. From demonstr. base *eno, see na1 and cp. a3) another etc. — A. By itself: 1. other, not the same, different, another, somebody else (opp. oneself) Vin.III, 144 (aññena, scil. maggena, gacchati to take a different route); Sn.459, 789, 904; Dh.158 (opp. attānaṃ), 165; J.I, 151 (opp. attano); II, 333 (aññaṃ vyākaroti give a diff. answer). — 2. another one, a second; nt. else, further Sn.1052 (= uttariṃ nt. Nd2 17); else J.I, 294. aññaṃ kiñci (indef.) anything else J.I, 151. yo añño every other, whoever else J.I, 256. — 3. aññe (pl.) (the) others, the rest Sn.189, 663, 911; Dh.43, 252, 355; J.I, 254. — B. del. in correlation: 1. copulative. añña . . añña the one . . the other (. . the third etc.); this, that & the other; some . . some Vin.I, 15; Miln.40; etc. ‹-› 2. reciprocative añño aññaṃ, aññamaññaṃ, aññoññaṃ one another, each other, mutually, reciprocally (in ordinary construction & declension of a noun or adj. in sg.; cp. Gr. a)llήlwn, allήlous in pl.). (a.) añño aññaṃ Dh.165. (b.) aññamañña (cp. BSk. añyamañya M Vastu II, 436), as pron.: n’ālaṃ aññamaññassa sukhāya vā dukkhāya vā D.I, 56 = S III 211. n’aññamaññassa dukkhaṃ iccheyya do not wish evil to each other Sn.148. daṇḍehi aññamaññaṃ upakkamanti (approach each other) M.I, 86 = Nd2 199. °ṃ agāravo viharati A.III, 247. dve janā °ṃ ghātayiṃsu (slew each other) J.I, 254. aññamaññaṃ hasanti J.V, 111; °ṃ musale hantvā J.V, 267. °ṃ daṇḍâbhigāṭena PvA.58; or adj.: aññamaññaṃ veraṃ bandhiṃsu (established mutual enmity) J.II, 353; °ṃ piyasaṃvāsaṃ vasiṃsu J.II, 153; aññamaññaṃ accayaṃ desetvā (their mutual mistake) DhA.I, 57; or adv. dve pi aññamaññaṃ paṭibaddha citta ahesuṃ (in love with each other) J.III, 188; or °-: aññamañña-paccaya mutually dependent, interrelated Ps.II, 49, 58. ‹-› (c.) aññoñña (°-) J.V, 251 (°nissita); Dāvs.V, 45 (°bhinna). — 3. disjunctive añña . . añña one . . the other, this one . . . that one, different, different from aññaṃ jīvaṃ . . aññaṃ sarīraṃ one is the soul . . the other is the body, i. e. the soul is different from the body D.I, 157; M.I, 430; A.V, 193; aññā va saññā bhavissati añño attā D.I, 187. Thus also in phrase aññena aññaṃ opposite, the contrary, differently, contradictory (lit. other from that which is other) Vin.II, 85 (paṭicarati make counter-charges); D.I, 57 (vyākāsi gave the opposite or contradictory reply); Miln.171 (aññaṃ kayiramānaṃ aññena sambharati). ‹-› anañña (1) not another, i. e. the same, self-same, identical M.I, 256 (= ayaṃ). — (2) not anotber, i. e. alone, by oneself, oneself only Sn.65 (°posin; opp. paraṃ) = Nd 4, cp. Nd2 36. — (3) not another, i. e. no more, only, alone Sn.p. 106 (dve va gatiyo bhavanti anaññā: and no other or no more, only two). See also under cpds.

—ādisa different J.VI, 212, °tā difference PvA.243. —khantika acquiescing in diff. views, following another faith (see khantika) D.I, 187; M.I, 487. —titthiya an adherent of another sect, a non-Buddhist.; D.III, 115; M.I, 494, 512; P II, 21, 32 sq., 119; III, 116 sq.; IV, 51, 228; V, 6, 27 sq.; A.I, 65, 240; II, 176; IV, 35 sq.; Vin.I, 60; J.I, 93; II, 415. —diṭṭhika having diff. views (combd. with añña-khantika) D.I, 187; M.I, 487. —neyya (an°) not to be guided by somebody else, i. e. independent in one’s views, having attained the right knowledge by oneself (opp. para°) Sn.55, 213, 364. —mano (an°) (adj.) not setting one’s heart upon others Vv 115 (see VvA.58). —vāda holding other views, an° (adj.) Dpvs.IV, 24. —vādaka one who gives a diff. account of things, one who distorts a matter, a prevaricator Vin.IV, 36. —vihita being occupied with something else, distracted, absent-minded Vin.IV, 269; DhA.III, 352, 381; °tā distraction, absentmindedness DhA.I, 181. —saraṇa (an°) not betaking oneself to others for refuge, i. e. of independent, sure knowledge S.III, 42 =.V, 154. —sita dependent or relying on others Sn.825. (Page 13)

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Aṇṇa, (food, cereal). See passages under aparaṇṇa & pubbaṇṇa. (Page 17)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

aṇṇā (अण्णा).—ind A term of respectful compellation or mention for a male. See vyavahārika nāva.

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anna (अन्न).—n (S) Victuals or provisions; esp. used of bread, rice, or other farinaceous food. Pr. annā- sārakhā lābha (nāhīṃ) maraṇāsārakhī hāni (nāhīṃ). Pr. anna tārī anna mārī annāsārakhā nāhīṃ vairī. 2 A preparation of food, a dish. Ex. vicitra annēṃ vā- ḍhilīṃ pātrīṃ|| anna anna karaṇēṃ or karīta phiraṇēṃ To wander about begging for food. Ex. tukayācī jyēṣṭha kāntā || mēlī anna anna karitāṃ || anna kaḍē kāṇṭhāsa ṭhēvaṇēṃ To put on one side, with a separating line drawn, that portion of victuals served which is excessive, or which it is designed to reserve. The line is drawn to preserve the food from being rendered impure. anna cāraṇēṃ To feed; to support or provide for. anna parabrahma Food is the excellent Brahma himself. All honor and glory to Food! annapāṇī or anna tuṭaṇēṃ or rāhaṇēṃ g. of s. To lose one's relish of food or one's appetite. annapāṇī sōḍaṇēṃ To give up food; to leave off eating. annā anna vastrāvara vastra (Food upon food, clothes upon clothes.) Good things in close succession. annāāḍa yēṇēṃ g. of o. To stand against or oppose one's means or prospects of subsistence. annācā That is fostered by or nourished by the food of. annācā māralēlā khālīṃ pāhī taravārīcā māralēlā vara pāhī Feed a man, and he stands downlooking, humble, submissive, ready to obey: strike a man, and he looks you daringly in the face. Kindness subdues: violence rouses up. annācī lāja dharaṇēṃ or, in. con. yēṇēṃ To do services for in consideration of having eaten the food of. annācēṃ khōbarēṃ hōṇēṃ A phrase expressive of dearth or scarcity. Current amongst people to whom cocoanuts are rare and precious. annācēṃ pāṇī kara- ṇēṃ (To turn one's food into water.) To destroy all the relish and nourishing power of one's food (through saying or doing something alarming or inauspicious at the time of eating). Also hōṇēṃ g. of s. annācyā pāṭhīṃ lāgaṇēṃ To go in pursuit of subsistence. annānta mātī kālaviṇēṃ or ghālaṇēṃ To destroy or impair the means of subsistence of. annā- muḷēṃ vāḷaṇēṃ To languish and waste from want of food. annāsa jāgaṇēṃ To be mindful of (grateful for) food or subsistence afforded. annāsa mahāga or annāsa mōtāda Extremely indigent; destitute of the common necessaries. annāsa lāvaṇēṃ or anna lāvaṇēṃ To put into the way of obtaining support; to give work or employment. khāllēṃ anna aṅgīṃ lā- gata nāhīṃ Used where a deed done, or a thing obtained, does not profit.

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anna (अन्न).—. Add as a phrase:--anna jāṇēṃ in con. To have appetite; to find food to be genial, kindly, agreeable &c.; to go down with.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

aṇṇā (अण्णा).—ind A term of respectful mention for a male.

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anna (अन्न).—n Victuals. annaanna karaṇēṃ Wander about, begging for food. anna tuṭaṇēṃ Lose one's appetite. annapāṇī sōḍaṇēṃ Give up food; leave off eating. annasatrīṃ (annachatrānta) jēvaṇēṃ, mirapūḍa māgaṇēṃ To dine upon charity and call out for sauce, to look a gift-horse in the mouth. annāā़ḍa yēṇēṃ Oppose one's means of subsistence. annācā māralēlā Bought over or made entirely sub- servient by feeding. annācyā pāṭhīṃ lāgaṇēṃ Go in pursuit of subsistence. annāsa jāgaṇēṃ Be mindful of (grateful for) food afforded. annāsa mahāga-mōtāda Ex- tremely indigent. annāsa lāvaṇēṃ Give employment.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Anna (अन्न).—[ad-kta; anityanena, an-nan; according to Yāska from ad, adyate atti ca bhūtāni; or from ā-nam, ā ābhi mukhyena hyetannataṃ prahvībhūtaṃ bhavati bhojanāya bhūtānām]

1) Food (in general); अद्यतेऽत्ति च भूतानि तस्मादन्नं तदुच्यते (adyate'tti ca bhūtāni tasmādannaṃ taducyate) Tait. Up.; मदोऽसृङ्मांसमज्जास्थि वदन्त्यन्नं मनीषिणः (mado'sṛṅmāṃsamajjāsthi vadantyannaṃ manīṣiṇaḥ) Ms.3.8.182; अहमन्नं भवान् भोक्ता (ahamannaṃ bhavān bhoktā) H.1.51. I am your prey &c.; चराणामन्नमचराः (carāṇāmannamacarāḥ) Ms.5.29.

2) Food as representing the lowest form in which the Supreme Soul is manifested, being the coarsest and last of the 5 vestures (kośa) in which the soul is clothed and passes from body to body in the long process of metempsychosis "the nutrimentitious vesture or visible body in the world of sense" (sthūla- śarīra called annamayakośa).

3) Boiled rice; अन्नेन व्यञ्जनम् (annena vyañjanam) P. II.1.34.

4) Corn (bread corn); ता () (āpaḥ) अन्नम- सृजन्त तस्माद्यत्र क्व च वर्षति तदेव भूयिष्ठमन्नं भवति (annama- sṛjanta tasmādyatra kva ca varṣati tadeva bhūyiṣṭhamannaṃ bhavati) Ch. Up. 6.2.4.; आदित्याज्जायते वृष्टिर्वृष्टेरन्नं ततः प्रजाः (ādityājjāyate vṛṣṭirvṛṣṭerannaṃ tataḥ prajāḥ) Ms.3.76; कृत° (kṛta°) 9.219;1.86,12.65.

5) Water.

6) Earth (pṛthivyā annahetutvādannaśabdavācyatā).

7) Name of Viṣṇu.

-nnaḥ The sun (sa hi annahetuvṛṣṭihetuḥ).

Derivable forms: annam (अन्नम्).

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Ānna (आन्न).—a. (-nnī f.) [अन्नं लब्धा अन्न-ण (annaṃ labdhā anna-ṇa) P.IV.4.85]

1) Fed, having food.

2) Relating to, derived from food.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 271 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Annaprashana
Annaprāśana (अन्नप्राशन) refers to the ceremony of “giving the child solid food” and represents...
Annada
Annada (अन्नद).—mfn. (-daḥ-dā-daṃ) One who gives food. f. (-dā) A goddess, a form of Durga. E. ...
Annapurna
Annapūrṇā (अन्नपूर्णा).—f. (-rṇā) A goddess, a form of Durga. E. anna, and pūrṇa who fills with...
Amanna
Āmānna (आमान्न).—n. (-nnaṃ) Undressed rice. E. āma and anna boiled rice.
Rajanna
Rājānna (राजान्न).—m. (-nnaḥ) A sort of rice, of a superior quality, said to grow in the Andhra...
Siddhanna
Siddha-anna.—(IE 8-8), cooked rice or uncooked food (cf. Hindī sīdhā). Note: siddha-anna is def...
Mishtanna
Miṣṭānna (मिष्टान्न).—n. (-nnaṃ) Sauce, gravy seasoning, a mixture of sugar and acids, &c. ...
Paranna
Parānna (परान्न).—mfn. (-nnaḥ-nnā-nnaṃ) Living at another’s expense. n. (-nnaṃ) 1. Food supplie...
Annavikara
Annavikāra (अन्नविकार).—m. (-raḥ) The seminal secretion E. anna, and vikāra change of form.
Devanna
Devānna (देवान्न).—n. (-nnaṃ) Rice or food that has been first presented to an idol. E. deva, a...
Paramanna
Paramānna (परमान्न) refers to a food preparation according to verse 25.89b-90a of the Īśvarasaṃ...
Citranna
Citrānna (चित्रान्न).—rice dressed with coloured condiments; Y.1.34. Derivable forms: citrānnam...
Gananna
Gaṇānna (गणान्न).—n. (-nnaṃ) A mess, food prepared for a number of Persons in common. E. gaṇa a...
Annacchadana
Annācchādana (अन्नाच्छादन).—food and clothing, food and raiment, the bare necessaries of life. ...
Havishyanna
Haviṣyānna (हविष्यान्न).—n. (-nnaṃ) Food fit to be eaten during certain holy days.

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