Annadana, Annadāna: 9 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Annadana means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: Wisdom Library: Pāñcarātra

Annadāna (अन्नदान) refers to an aspect of nṛsiṃha (‘man-lion’), according to the Vihagendra-saṃhitā 4.17, which mentions seventy-four forms (inlcuding twenty forms of vyūha). He is also known as Annadānanṛsiṃha or Annadānanarasiṃha. Nṛsiṃha is a Tantric deity and refers to the furious (ugra) incarnation of Viṣṇu.

The 15th-century Vihagendra-saṃhīta is a canonical text of the Pāñcarātra corpus and, in twenty-four chapters, deals primarely with meditation on mantras and sacrificial oblations.

Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Dharmashastra (religious law)

Source: Shodhganga: The saurapurana - a critical study (dharma)

Annadāna (अन्नदान) refers to one of the various types of gifts (dāna) according to the Dharmaśāstra taught in the 10th century Saurapurāṇa: one of the various Upapurāṇas depicting Śaivism.—Accordingly, the gift to the poor is highly extolled by the compiler of the Saurapurāṇa. Then the text describes bhūmidāna, vidyādāna, annadāna, jaladāna, tiladāna, vāsadāna, dīpadāna, yānadāna, śayyādāna, dhānyadāna etc. along with their accruing results. [...] Thus it appears that the Saurapurāṇa lays emphasis on dāna to the devotees of Śiva and categorically says that if somebody surpassing śivabhaktas donates to others, his dāna becomes futile and he goes to hell.

Dharmashastra book cover
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Dharmashastra (धर्मशास्त्र, dharmaśāstra) contains the instructions (shastra) regarding religious conduct of livelihood (dharma), ceremonies, jurisprudence (study of law) and more. It is categorized as smriti, an important and authoritative selection of books dealing with the Hindu lifestyle.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

annadāna (अन्नदान).—n (S) Giving of food, supporting, maintaining.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

annadāna (अन्नदान).—n Giving of food, supporting, maintaining.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Annadāna (अन्नदान).—n.

(-naṃ) The giving of rice or food, the maintenance of a person. E. anna, and dāna giving.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Annadāna (अन्नदान) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—[dharma] Burnell. 140^b. 150^a.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Annadāna (अन्नदान):—[=anna-dāna] [from anna] n. the giving of food.

2) Annādana (अन्नादन):—[from anna] n. eating of food.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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