Sucimukha, aka: Sūcimukha, Sūcīmukha, Suci-mukha; 11 Definition(s)

Introduction

Sucimukha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Suchimukha.

In Hinduism

Purana

[Sucimukha in Purana glossaries]

Sūcimukha (सूचिमुख).—A hell. (See under Kāla the section on hell).

(Source): archive.org: Puranic Encyclopaedia

1a) Sūcīmukha (सूचीमुख).—One of twenty-eight hells, intended for the haughty and the miserly.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa V. 26. 7 and 36.

1b) A commander of Bhaṇḍa: killed by Tiraskarṇikā.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 21. 78; 24. 9, 44, 96.

1c) A Piśāca clan.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 69. 265.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

[Sucimukha in Natyashastra glossaries]

1) Sūcīmukha (सूचीमुख) refers to a gesture (āṅgika) made with a ‘single hand’ (asaṃyuta), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. It is also known by the name Sūcyāsya. The hands (hasta) form a part of the human body which represents one of the six major limbs (aṅga) used in dramatic performance. With these limbs are made the various gestures (āṅgika), which form a part of the histrionic representation (abhinaya).

2) Sūcīmukha (सूचीमुख) is another name for Sūcyāsya, a Sanskrit technical term referring to a gesture (āṅgika) made with ‘dance hands’ (nṛttahasta), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 8. It is also known by the name Sūcīmukha.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

1) Sūcīmukha (सूचीमुख).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made with a single hand (asaṃyuta-hasta);—(Instructions): The fore finger of the Kaṭakāmukha hand to be stretched.

(Uses): I shall tell you briefly of its various uses as the forefinger [in it] is raised and bent, moving sideways, shaking, moving up and down, and moving up without any rest. By moving the forefinger upwards [in this hand] are to be represented discus, lightning, banners, blossoms, earring, zigzag movement, a cry of approbation, young serpent, young sprout, incense, lamp, creepers, Śikhaṇḍa, falling down, curve and roundness and with the forefinger raised this [hand] again should be used in [representing] stars, nose, [the number] one, club and stick.

2) Sūcīmukha (सूचीमुख).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made with dance-hands (nṛttahasta);—(Instructions): The two Sarpaśiraḥ hands with their thumbs touching middle fingers are to stretch their tips obliquely. The Dance-hands are to be used in forming Karaṇas.

(Source): archive.org: Natya Shastra
Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Dhanurveda (science of warfare)

[Sucimukha in Dhanurveda glossaries]

Sūcīmukha (सूचीमुख) refers to a kind of weapon (the point of a needle). It is a Sanskrit word defined in the Dhanurveda-saṃhitā, which contains a list of no less than 117 weapons. The Dhanurveda-saṃhitā is said to have been composed by the sage Vasiṣṭha, who in turn transmitted it trough a tradition of sages, which can eventually be traced to Śiva and Brahmā.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Dhanurveda
Dhanurveda book cover
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Dhanurveda (धनुर्वेद) refers to the “knowledge of warfare” and, as an upaveda, is associated with the Ṛgveda. It contains instructions on warfare, archery and ancient Indian martial arts, dating back to the 2nd-3rd millennium BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[Sucimukha in Shaktism glossaries]

Sūcimukha (सूचिमुख) refers to one of the thirty hells (naraka) mentioned in the Devī-bhāgavata-purāṇa 8.21 (on the narrative of hells). The hells are destinations where dead beings brought by messengers of Yama (the God of the Pitṛs), and get punished by him according to their karmas and faults.

The Devī-bhāgavata-purāṇa or Śrīmad-devī-bhāgavatam (mentioning Sūcimukha), is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, a type of Sanskrit literature containing cultural information on ancient India, religious/spiritual prescriptions and a range of topics concerning the various arts and sciences. The whole text is composed of 18,000 metrical verses, possibly originating from before the 6th century.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Śrīmad Devī Bhāgavatam
Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

[Sucimukha in Rasashastra glossaries]

Sūcīmukha (सूचीमुख) is the name of an Ayurvedic recipe defined in the fourth volume of the Rasajalanidhi (chapter 2, dealing with jvara: fever). These remedies are classified as Iatrochemistry and form part of the ancient Indian science known as Rasaśāstra (medical alchemy). Pārvatīśaṅkara is an ayurveda treatment and should be taken with caution and in accordance with rules laid down in the texts.

Accordingly, when using such recipes (eg., sūcīmukha-rasa): “the minerals (uparasa), poisons (viṣa), and other drugs (except herbs), referred to as ingredients of medicines, are to be duly purified and incinerated, as the case may be, in accordance with the processes laid out in the texts.” (see introduction to Iatro chemical medicines)

(Source): Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra
Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Katha (narrative stories)

[Sucimukha in Katha glossaries]

Sūcīmukha (सूचीमुख) is the name of a bird, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 59. Accordingly, as Karaṭaka said to Damanaka: “... whoever says much to a person who despises good advice, incurs thereby misfortune, as Sūcīmukha from the ape... ”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Sūcīmukha, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara
Katha book cover
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Katha (कथा, kathā) refers to narrative Sanskrit literature often inspired from epic legendry (itihasa) and poetry (mahākāvya). Some Kathas reflect socio-political instructions for the King while others remind the reader of important historical event and exploits of the Gods, Heroes and Sages.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[Sucimukha in Pali glossaries]

sūcimukha : (m.) a mosquito.

(Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

[Sucimukha in Marathi glossaries]

sūcimukha (सूचिमुख).—a Pointed, peaked, tapering.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Sucimukha in Sanskrit glossaries]

Sūcimukha (सूचिमुख) or Sūcīmukha (सूचीमुख).—a.

1) needle-mouthed, having a pointed beak.

2) pointed. (-khaḥ) 1 a bird.

2) white Kuśa grass.

3) a particular position of the hands.

-kham a diamond.

Sūcimukha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms sūci and mukha (मुख).

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 628 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Shuci
1) Śuci (शुचि).—A deva (god) who was born in Agnivaṃśa. This Śuci was the son of Agnideva who w...
Sumukha
1) Sumukha (सुमुख).—A nāga, son of Kaśyapa Prajāpati by his wife Kadrū. Sumukha was the grandso...
Mukha
Mukha (मुख).—Face, top-side of an object or figure with more than three sides, especially the t...
Durmukha
Durmukha (दुर्मुख) participated in the war between Rāma and Rāvaṇa, on the side of the latter, ...
Gomukha
Gomukha (गोमुख) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.61.58) and represents one of the...
Adhomukha
Adhomukha (अधोमुख).—a. having the face downwards; °खी तिष्ठति (khī tiṣṭhati); °खैः पत्रिभिः (kh...
Caturmukha
Caturmukha (Apabhraṃśa Caumuha=nominative Caumuhu), we see that he was one of the greatest Apab...
Kalamukha
Kālamukha (कालमुख).—A hybrid race born from the union of men and Rākṣasas. Sahadeva defeated th...
Kartarimukha
Kartarīmukha (कर्तरीमुख).—A particular position of the hands.Derivable forms: kartarīmukhaḥ (कर...
Shrimukha
Śrīmukha (श्रीमुख) or Śrīmukhāgama refers to one of upāgamas (supplementary scriptures) of the ...
Mukharaga
Mukharāga (मुखराग).—the colour or complexion of the face; ददृशुर्विस्मितास्तस्य मुखरागं समं जना...
Ajamukha
Ajamukha (अजमुख).—(Ajavaktra) He was one of the soldiers in Skanda’s army. (Mahābhārata, Śalya ...
Valimukha
Valīmukha (वलीमुख) is the name of a monkey-king, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 63....
Ashvamukha
Aśvamukha (अश्वमुख).—a. [aśvasya mukhamiva mukhamasya] having the head or face of a horse. -kha...
Nandimukha
Nāndīmukha (नान्दीमुख).—a. (the class of manes or deceased ancestors) to whom the नान्दीमुख- श्...

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