Shrirama, Śrīrāma, Shri-rama: 9 definitions

Introduction

Shrirama means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śrīrāma can be transliterated into English as Srirama or Shrirama, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (S) next»] — Shrirama in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Śrīrāma (श्रीराम).—See under Rāma.

Source: Shodhganga: The saurapurana - a critical study

Śrīrāma (श्रीराम) is another name for Rāma: one of the four sons of Daśaratha who is the grandson of Raghu, according to the Vaṃśānucarita section of the 10th century Saurapurāṇa: one of the various Upapurāṇas depicting Śaivism.—Accordingly, [...] Raghu was the son of Dīrghabāhu. The son of Raghu was very famous from whom Daśaratha was born. Daśaratha had four sons who were religious and famous in the world. They were Rāma (Śrīrāma), Bharata, Lakṣmaṇa and Śatrughna. All of them were devoted to Lord Mahādeva.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Śrīrāma (श्रीराम) is the name of an Ayurvedic recipe defined in the fourth volume of the Rasajalanidhi (chapter 2, dealing with jvara: fever). These remedies are classified as Iatrochemistry and form part of the ancient Indian science known as Rasaśāstra (medical alchemy). Pārvatīśaṅkara is an ayurveda treatment and should be taken with caution and in accordance with rules laid down in the texts.

Accordingly, when using such recipes (eg., śrīrāma-rasa): “the minerals (uparasa), poisons (viṣa), and other drugs (except herbs), referred to as ingredients of medicines, are to be duly purified and incinerated, as the case may be, in accordance with the processes laid out in the texts.” (see introduction to Iatro chemical medicines)

Rasashastra book cover
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Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Source: archive.org: Isvara Samhita Vol 5

Śrīrāma (श्रीराम) refers to one of the various Vibhava manifestations according to the Īśvarasaṃhitā 24.343-344.—Accordingly, “He (Śrīrāma) alone is to be meditated upon who destroyed for the sake of Yogins the dreadful demon of mind, having ten heads with the multitude arrows of discrimination. He is the soul of the universe. His radiance (colour) is like that of the water-taken cloud. His eyes are like red lotus. His hands are marked bear by the bow and arrows”.

These Vibhavas (eg., Śrīrāma) represent the third of the five-fold manifestation of the Supreme Consciousness the Pāñcarātrins believe in. Note: Kṛṣṇa is represented here more as a guide and instructor of people than as a child in Gokula.

Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)

Śrīrāma or simply Rāma is the name of a deity depicted at Ramaswamy Temple in Kumbakonam (Kumbhakonam), representing a sacred place for the worship of Viṣṇu.—(a) In the sannidhi for Rāma, there are icons of Rāma, Sītā, Lakṣmaṇa and Hanumān. [...] The mūla-bera of Śrīrāma is found seated in sukhāsana with two hands. The right hand holds vyākhyāna-mudrā and the left hand is in kaṭaka-hasta. Sītā is found seated to the left of Rāma in sukhāsana posture with the right leg folded and left leg hanging. (b) In front of the stone images are the utsava-mūrti of Rāma, Sītā, Lakṣmaṇa, Bharata, Satrukguṇa and Hanumān. Rāma is found in standing posture with dhanur-hasta in the left hand and kaṭaka-hasta in the right hand.

The images of Rāma Sītā and Lakṣmana are made out of stone. While depicting in dancing, Rāma and Lakṣmaṇa are found in samapāda-sthānaka with the right hand in kapittha-hasta and the left hand in śikhara-hasta.

Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: WikiPedia: Hinduism

Śrīrāma (श्रीराम).—Also knew as Rama, Ramachandra or Sri Rama. Hanumana tells Bhima how he was deeply thrilled when he happened to touch Rama's body. This king of Ayodhya was banished to the forest for fourteen years, killed Ravana the king of Lanka who abducted his wife, Sita.

India history and geogprahy

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Śrī-Rāma.—(ASLV), sign manual of some kings of Vijaya- nagara who often wrote Śrī-Virūpākṣa for the purpose. Note: śrī-rāma is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śrīrāma (श्रीराम).—m.

(-maḥ) Ramachandra. E. śrī celebrated, and rāma Rama.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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See also (Relevant definitions)

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