Shauri, Śauri, Sauri, Saurī: 12 definitions

Introduction

Shauri means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Śauri can be transliterated into English as Sauri or Shauri, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Wisdom Library: The Matsya-purāṇa

Saurī (सौरी) is the name of a mind-born ‘divine mother’ (mātṛ), created for the purpose of drinking the blood of the Andhaka demons, according to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.8. The Andhaka demons spawned out of every drop of blood spilled from the original Andhakāsura (Andhaka-demon). According to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.35, “Most terrible they (eg., Saurī) all drank the blood of those Andhakas and become exceedingly satiated.”

The Matsyapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 20,000 metrical verses, dating from the 1st-millennium BCE. The narrator is Matsya, one of the ten major avatars of Viṣṇu.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Śauri (शौरि).—Vasudeva, the son of Śūrasena.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Śauri (शौरि).—A name of Vāsudeva.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 46. 13.

2a) Sauri (सौरि).—Is Śanaiścara (planet) 250,000 yojanas above Bṛhaspati; above are seven sages.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 24. 105; Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 7. 9.

2b) Belonging to Ārṣeya pravara of Angiras.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 195. 43.

2c) An adopted son of Vastāvana.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 96. 189.

3) Saurī (सौरी).—A mind-born mother.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 179. 10.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Saurī (सौरी) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. I.89.42) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Saurī) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Yoga (school of philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Yoga

Saurī is one of the eighty-four Siddhas associated with eighty-four Yogic postures (āsanas), according to popular tradition in Jodhpur, Rājasthān. These posture-performing Siddhas are drawn from illustrative sources known as the Nava-nātha-caurāsī-siddha from Vȧrāṇasī and the Nava-nātha-caruāsī-siddha-bālāsundarī-yogamāyā from Puṇe. They bear some similarity between the eighty-four Siddhas painted on the walls of the sanctum of the temple in Mahāmandir.

The names of these Siddhas (eg., Saurī) to 19th-century inscription on a painting from Jodhpur, which is labelled as “Maharaja Mansing and eighty-four Yogis”. The association of Siddhas with yogis reveals the tradition of seeing Matsyendra and his disciple Gorakṣa as the founders of haṭhayoga.

Yoga book cover
context information

Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wikibooks (hi): Sanskrit Technical Terms

Sauri (सौरि).—Saturn. Note: Sauri is a Sanskrit technical term used in ancient Indian sciences such as Astronomy, Mathematics and Geometry.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

saurī (सौरी).—f (S Wife of the sun.) A neuter who adopts the female garb. 2 Applied to a forward unblushing female.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śauri (शौरि).—

1) Name of Viṣṇu or Kṛṣṇa.

2) Of Balarāma.

3) Of Vasudeva; स संस्कृत्य नरश्रेष्ठं मातुलं शौरिमात्मनः (sa saṃskṛtya naraśreṣṭhaṃ mātulaṃ śaurimātmanaḥ) Mb. 1.2.58; Bhāg.3.1.27.

4) The planet Saturn.

Derivable forms: śauriḥ (शौरिः).

--- OR ---

Sauri (सौरि).—[sūrasyāpatyaṃ pumān iñ]

1) Name of the planet Saturn.

2) The Asana tree.

3) Name of Yama.

4) Of Karṇa.

5) Of Sugrīva.

Derivable forms: sauriḥ (सौरिः).

--- OR ---

Saurī (सौरी).—

1) The wife of the sun.

2) A cow.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Śauri (शौरि).—m.

(-riḥ) 1. A name of Vishnu or Krishna. 2. The planet Saturn. E. śūra a proper name or a hero, aff.

--- OR ---

Sauri (सौरि).—m.

(-riḥ) 1. Saturn. 2. The Asana tree. 3. Karna. 4. Sugriva. E. sūra the sun, and aff. of descent.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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