Sarvajna, Sarvajña, Sarvajñā, Sārvajña, Sarva-jna: 24 definitions

Introduction:

Sarvajna means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: ISKCON Press: Glossary

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ).—Omniscient; one who knows everything-past, present and future.

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Sarvajna in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ) refers to one who is “omniscient”, and is used as an epithet of Śiva, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.2.19. Accordingly as Brahmā narrated to Nārada:—“[...] thus commanded by Śiva in the presence of all, Viṣṇu spoke thus propitiating the great lord:—‘[...] O omniscient (sarvajña), great lord, Sadāśiva, you know all. But you wish to make it all heard through my oral explanation’”.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ).—A son of Atri, the avatār of the 12th dvāpara.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 23. 157.

2) Sarvajñā (सर्वज्ञा).—A śakti, in the Sarvajñādyantaram—a protection of cakra.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 19. 42; 36. 92.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śilpa-śāstra

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ) is a Sanskrit name referring to one of the eight manifestations of Kāpāla, and also Bhīṣaṇa, both forms of Bhairava. According to the Rudrayāmala, there are eight main forms of Bhairava who control the eight directions of this universe. Each form (e.g., Kāpāla) has a further eight sub-manifestations (e.g., Sarvajña), thus resulting in a total of 64 Bhairavas.

When depicting Sarvajña according to traditional iconographic rules (śilpaśāstra), one should depcit him (and other forms of Kāpāla) having a yellow color and should carry in their hands the kuṇḍa, the kheṭaka, the parigha (a kind of club) and bhiṇḍipāla. The word Śilpaśāstra refers to an ancient Hindu science of arts and crafts, dealing with subjects such as painting, sculpture and iconography.

When depicting Sarvajña as one of the eight manifestations of Bhīṣaṇa, one should depict him having a red color and should carry in their hands the kuṇḍa, the kheṭaka, the parigha (a kind of club) and bhiṇḍipāla. The word Śilpaśāstra refers to an ancient Hindu science of arts and crafts, dealing with subjects such as painting, sculpture and iconography.

Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Pt. Sanjay Rath: Bṛhaspati Kavacha Mantra

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ) refers to one of the 18 names of Jupiter (Bṛhaspati) according to the Bṛhaspati-kavaca-mantra from the Brahmayāmalatantra. In jyotiṣa there is a saying that when Jupiter protects there is none that can destroy. The eighteen names of Jupiter (viz., Sarvajña) relate to eighteen body parts starting from the top of head (śiras). One method uses this formula: Each name associates with two drekkāṇa reckoned from lagna in the horoscope.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ) refers to “one who is omniscient”, according to the second recension of the Yogakhaṇḍa of the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, as the Goddess (i.e., Kumārī) said to the God (i.e., Bhairava), “[...] Accomplishment is achieved in a special way by the transmission that takes place from master to disciple. You are my Lord, so how can you relate (to me as my) disciple? O Mahādeva, you are omniscient [i.e., sarvajña]; how can you (assume the role of a) disciple? Bearing this in mind, tell me what would be best, and free of fear”.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (shaktism)

Sarvajñā (सर्वज्ञा) refers to one of ten Goddesses mentioned in the Kāmasiddhi-stuti (also Vāmakeśvarī-stuti) and the Vāmakeśvaratantra (also known as Nityāṣoḍaśikārṇava).—[...] The next four verses, 17–20 [of the Kāmasiddhistuti], respectively praise the set of ten Goddesses. The list can be completed with the help of the Vāmakeśvaratantra (1.173-175) [e.g., Sarvajñā].

Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (philosophy)

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ) refers to “omniscient”, according to the Nyāyamañjarī, vol. I, 326.—Accordingly, “[...] Among these [two types of inference,] who would not admit the validity of an inference such as that [of fire] from smoke? So [people] apprehend what is to be established [by such an inference] even though they are not pestered by logicians. But the validity of an inference regarding such [entities] as the Self, God, an omniscient (sarvajña) or an afterlife is not acknowledged by those who know reality”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Sarvajñā (सर्वज्ञा) refers to the “omniscient one”, according to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter 2).—Accordingly, [...] In this stanza, the Buddha does not say that it is the generous person who will obtain joy, or the person with knowledge, morality, patience, energy, dhyāna, or wisdom. The Buddha is speaking only of the faithful. His intention is the following: My supreme profound doctrine is subtle, immense, incalculable, inconceivable, immoveable, without support, without attachment and without perceived object. But it is not true that the omniscient one (sarvajñā) is unable to explain it. That is why, in the Buddha’s doctrine, the power of faith is primordial. It is by faith that one enters into it and not by generosity, discipline, patience, energy, dhyāna or wisdom.

Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ) refers to the “(one who is) omniscient”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly, “Then the Bodhisattva Gaganagañja, having praised the Lord with these verses, addressed himself to the Lord: ‘[...] The Lord, who is without distinction (nirviśeṣa), practices (prayoga) sameness (samatā) of all living beings since he is purified just like open space. Since the Lord has no desire, he is satisfied with insight (prajñatṛpta) and free from gain, honor and fame. Since the Lord is omniscient (sarvajña), his mode of five eyes is purified and sees everything’. [...]’”.

Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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General definition (in Buddhism)

Source: krindology.com: Kumārila’s Critique of Omniscience

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ) refers to the “concept of omniscience” [which] in Indian Philosophy means that being (human/God) possesses truth such as dharma, heaven (svarga), liberation (moksa) etc. beyond the scope of knowledge about empirical world. In other words, the term Omniscience is indicated a person/god knows reality (tattvajñatā). This term is used not only in the tradition of Brahmanical philosophy but also in all religious traditions, including Buddhism, Jainism.

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

1) Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ) refers to “all-knowing” and is used to describe the Self (Ātman), according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “This self itself is clearly a great ocean of excellent virtues. It is all-knowing (sarvajña), all-pervading, having all forms, supreme [and] pure”.

2) Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ) refers to the “omniscient one” (i.e. the Jina).—Accordingly, “Examination of the instruction [of the Jina] is considered to be when, through the application of the instruction of the omniscient one (sarvajña-ājñābhiyoga) (i.e. the Jina), [the meditator] reflects upon the true state of objects laid down in his doctrine”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ).—a (S) Knowing all things, omniscient.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ).—a Knowing all things, omniscient.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Sārvajña (सार्वज्ञ).—Omniscience.

Derivable forms: sārvajñam (सार्वज्ञम्).

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Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ).—a. all-knowing, omniscient. (-m.)

1) an epithet of Śiva.

2) of Buddha.

3) the Supreme Being.

Sarvajña is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms sarva and jña (ज्ञ). See also (synonyms): sarvavid.

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Sarvajñā (सर्वज्ञा).—Name of Durgā.

Sarvajñā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms sarva and jñā (ज्ञा).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ).—omniscient, as epithet of a Buddha: Mahāvyutpatti 14 et al.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ) or Sarvvajña.—mfn.

(-jñaḥ-jñā-jñaṃ) Omniscient, all-wise. m.

(-jñaḥ) 1. Siva. 2. A Jina or Budd'ha, or deified sage peculiar to those sects. E. sarva all, and jña who knows.

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Sārvajña (सार्वज्ञ) or Sārvvajña.—n.

(-jñaṃ) Omniscience.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ).—[sarva-jña], I. adj. Omniscient, [Hitopadeśa] 129, 9; [Bhartṛhari, (ed. Bohlen.)] 2, 8. Ii. m. Śiva.

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Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ).—adj. omniscient, [Bhartṛhari, (ed. Bohlen.)] 2, 8.

— Cf. [Latin] beni-gnus, mali-gnus.

Sarvajña is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms sarva and jña (ज्ञ).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ).—[adjective] all-knowing, all-wise; [abstract] [feminine], tva [neuter]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

1) Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—king of Karṇāṭa, had a son Aniruddhadeva, who was father of Rūpeśvara and Harihara. Rūpeśvara’s son Padmanābha had five sons, Puruṣottama, Jagannātha, Nārāyaṇa, Murāri, Mukunda. The last of these had one son, Kumāra, whose three sons were Sanātana, Rūpa and Vallabha.

2) Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ):—elder brother of Cinnabhaṭṭa (Tarkabhāṣāprakāśikā). Oxf. 244^a.

3) Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ):—poet. Padyāvalī. See Loṣṭasarvajña, Śailasarvajña.

4) Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ):—Rāmāyaṇaṭīkā. Quoted by Lokanātha, L. 1259.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ):—[=sarva-jña] [from sarva] mf(ā)n. all-knowing, omniscient (said of gods and men, [especially] of ministers and philosophers), [Upaniṣad; Kāvya literature] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] a Buddha, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] an Arhat (with Jainas), [ib.]

4) [v.s. ...] Name of Śiva, [Pañcatantra; Kāśī khaṇḍa, from the skanda-purāṇa]

5) [v.s. ...] of various men, [Rāmāyaṇa; Hitopadeśa; Buddhist literature]

6) Sarvajñā (सर्वज्ञा):—[=sarva-jñā] [from sarva-jña > sarva] f. Name of Durgā, [DevīP.]

7) [v.s. ...] of a Yoginī, [Hemādri’s Caturvarga-cintāmaṇi]

8) Sārvajña (सार्वज्ञ):—[=sārva-jña] [from sārva] mf(ī)n. ([from] sarva-jña) coming from or relating to one who is omniscient, [Hemacandra’s Pariśiṣṭaparvan]

9) [v.s. ...] n. [wrong reading] for next.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ):—[sarva-jña] (jñaḥ) 1. m. Shiva; a Jaina. a. Omniscient.

[Sanskrit to German]

Sarvajna in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Sarvajña (ಸರ್ವಜ್ಞ):—

1) [noun] he who knows everything; an all-knowing man.

2) [noun] the Supreme Being.

3) [noun] Śiva.

4) [noun] the Buddha, the founder of Buddhism.

5) [noun] Jina, the spiritual teacher of Jainas.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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