Sarvajna, Sarvajña, Sarvajñā, Sārvajña, Sarva-jna: 14 definitions

Introduction

Sarvajna means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: ISKCON Press: Glossary

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ).—Omniscient; one who knows everything-past, present and future.

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous (S) next»] — Sarvajna in Purana glossary
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ).—A son of Atri, the avatār of the 12th dvāpara.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 23. 157.

2) Sarvajñā (सर्वज्ञा).—A śakti, in the Sarvajñādyantaram—a protection of cakra.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 19. 42; 36. 92.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Wisdom Library: Śilpa-śāstra

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ) is a Sanskrit name referring to one of the eight manifestations of Kāpāla, and also Bhīṣaṇa, both forms of Bhairava. According to the Rudrayāmala, there are eight main forms of Bhairava who control the eight directions of this universe. Each form (eg., Kāpāla) has a further eight sub-manifestations (eg., Sarvajña), thus resulting in a total of 64 Bhairavas.

When depicting Sarvajña according to traditional iconographic rules (śilpaśāstra), one should depcit him (and other forms of Kāpāla) having a yellow color and should carry in their hands the kuṇḍa, the kheṭaka, the parigha (a kind of club) and bhiṇḍipāla. The word Śilpaśāstra refers to an ancient Hindu science of arts and crafts, dealing with subjects such as painting, sculpture and iconography.

When depicting Sarvajña as one of the eight manifestations of Bhīṣaṇa, one should depict him having a red color and should carry in their hands the kuṇḍa, the kheṭaka, the parigha (a kind of club) and bhiṇḍipāla. The word Śilpaśāstra refers to an ancient Hindu science of arts and crafts, dealing with subjects such as painting, sculpture and iconography.

Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Pt. Sanjay Rath: Bṛhaspati Kavacha Mantra

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ) refers to one of the 18 names of Jupiter (Bṛhaspati) according to the Bṛhaspati-kavaca-mantra from the Brahmayāmalatantra. In jyotiṣa there is a saying that when Jupiter protects there is none that can destroy. The eighteen names of Jupiter (viz., Sarvajña) relate to eighteen body parts starting from the top of head (śiras). One method uses this formula: Each name associates with two drekkāṇa reckoned from lagna in the horoscope.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Hindu Philosophy (darshana)

[(S)] — Sarvajna in Hindu Philosophy glossary
Source: krindology.com: Kumārila’s Critique of Omniscience (p)

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ) refers to the “concept of omniscience” [which] in Indian Philosophy means that being (human/God) possesses truth such as dharma, heaven (svarga), liberation (moksa) etc. beyond the scope of knowledge about empirical world. In other words, the term Omniscience is indicated a person/god knows reality (tattvajñatā). This term is used not only in the tradition of Brahmanical philosophy but also in all religious traditions, including Buddhism, Jainism.

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Philosophy in Hinduism is termed Astika (āstika) and refers to the six schools accepting the Vedas as authoritative: Nyaya (logic), Vaisheshika (atomism), Samkhya (enumeration), Yoga (Patanjali’s school), Mimamsa (Vedic exegesis) and Vedanta (based on the Upanishads). Together they also go by the name Shad-Darshana (‘six systems’).

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ).—a (S) Knowing all things, omniscient.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ).—a Knowing all things, omniscient.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Sārvajña (सार्वज्ञ).—Omniscience.

Derivable forms: sārvajñam (सार्वज्ञम्).

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Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ).—a. all-knowing, omniscient. (-m.)

1) an epithet of Śiva.

2) of Buddha.

3) the Supreme Being.

Sarvajña is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms sarva and jña (ज्ञ). See also (synonyms): sarvavid.

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Sarvajñā (सर्वज्ञा).—Name of Durgā.

Sarvajñā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms sarva and jñā (ज्ञा).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ).—omniscient, as ep. of a Buddha: Mvy 14 et al.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sarvajña (सर्वज्ञ) or Sarvvajña.—mfn.

(-jñaḥ-jñā-jñaṃ) Omniscient, all-wise. m.

(-jñaḥ) 1. Siva. 2. A Jina or Budd'ha, or deified sage peculiar to those sects. E. sarva all, and jña who knows.

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Sārvajña (सार्वज्ञ) or Sārvvajña.—n.

(-jñaṃ) Omniscience.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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