Sarvaloka, Sarva-loka: 9 definitions

Introduction:

Sarvaloka means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

[«previous next»] — Sarvaloka in Jyotisha glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Sarvaloka (सर्वलोक) refers to “mankind at large”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 4), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “If the two horns of the moon should appear but slightly raised and far from each other presenting the appearance of a boat, she brings trouble on the sailors but prosperity on mankind at large [i.e., sarvaloka]. If the northern horn of the moon should be higher than the other by one-half, the moon appearing like a plough, ploughmen will then suffer. They and their prince will be friendly and there will be prosperity in the land. If the southern horn should be higher than the other by one half, the appearance of the moon is also said to be plough like but of evil consequences. The ruler of Southern India will die and his army will engage in war”.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Sarvaloka in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Sarvaloka (सर्वलोक) refers to “(all the) worlds”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.3.15 (“The penance and reign of Tārakāsura”).—Accordingly, as Brahmā narrated: “[...] At the same time, several phenomena of evil portent forboding misery and distress happened, when the son of Varāṅgī was born making the gods miserable. O dear, the phenomena of three varieties indicating great calamity and terrifying the worlds [i.e., sarvaloka-bhayaṃkara] occurred in the sky, heaven and earth. I shall narrate them. With a terrifying noise, thunderbolts fell along with comets; shooting meteors rose up, making the world miserable. [...]”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

[«previous next»] — Sarvaloka in Jainism glossary
Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Sarvaloka (सर्वलोक) refers to the “entire universe”, according to Pūjyapāda’s Sarvārthasiddhi.—Accordingly, “In one minute living being there are organisms infinite times the emancipated souls. Thus the entire universe (sarvaloka) is densely filled with one-sensed beings with no interspace. To become a being with more than one sense is as difficult as finding out a very small piece of diamond buried in the sands of an ocean. Even among these most of them are endowed with imperfect senses (i.e. less than five senses). Hence birth as a five-sensed being is as rare as gratitude among the good qualities. [...]”.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Sarvaloka in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Sarvaloka (सर्वलोक).—the universe.

Derivable forms: sarvalokaḥ (सर्वलोकः).

Sarvaloka is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms sarva and loka (लोक).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sarvaloka (सर्वलोक) or Sarvvaloka.—m.

(-kaḥ) The universe. E. sarva, and loka world.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sarvaloka (सर्वलोक).—[masculine] the universe; all people, every one (also [plural] & —°).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Sarvaloka (सर्वलोक):—[=sarva-loka] [from sarva] m. the whole world, [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā; Harivaṃśa; Rāmāyaṇa]

2) [v.s. ...] the whole people, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

3) [v.s. ...] every one, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa] etc. [plural] (or [in the beginning of a compound]) all beings, [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

4) [v.s. ...] ev° one, [Rāmāyaṇa; Pañcarātra] etc.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Sarvaloka (सर्वलोक):—[sarva-loka] (kaḥ) 1. m. The universe.

[Sanskrit to German]

Sarvaloka in German

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Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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