Sarshapa, aka: Sārṣapa, Sarṣapa; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Sarshapa means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Sārṣapa and Sarṣapa can be transliterated into English as Sarsapa or Sarshapa, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Āyurveda (science of life)

1) Sārṣapa (अम्लिका) is a Sanskrit word probably referring to Brassica rapa, a plant species in the Brassicaceae family. Certain plant parts of Sārṣapa are eaten as a vegetable (śāka), according to Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Āyurvedic work. The plant is therefore part of the Śākavarga group of medicinal plants, referring to the “group of vegetables/pot-herbs”. Caraka defined such groups (vargas) based on the dietic value of the plant.

According to the Rājanighaṇṭu (verses 7.147), the leaves of the Sāṛsapa (sārṣapapatra) are very hot and cause vitiation of rakta and pitta. This śāka is pungent, tasty and causes burning sensation. It though improves appetite yet causes loss of semen production.

Properties according to Caraka-saṃhitā: The vegetable of mustard aggravates three doṣas, is constipating and antidiuretic (similar is that of ratkanāla (raktanāla?) which is particularly rough and sour).

2) Sarṣapa (सर्षप) is a Sanskrit word referring to the Brassica juncea (“Indian mustard”), a species of mustard plant from the Brassicaceae (cabbage) family. It is also known as Rājikā, or as Kaṭaku in the Malayalam language. It is used throughout Āyurvedic literature such as the Suśruta-saṃhitā. The leaves, seeds and the stem of this plant are edible.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany
Āyurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

General definition (in Hinduism)

Sarṣapa (सर्षप) denoting ‘mustard’ or ‘mustard seed’, occurs only a few times in later Vedic texts.

(Source): archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

sarṣapa (सर्षप).—m S A sort of mustard, Sinapis dichotoma. 2 A mustard seed as a measure of weight.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

Relevant definitions

Search found 9 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Krishnasarshapa
Kṛṣṇasarṣapa (कृष्णसर्षप) is another name for Rājasarṣapa, which is a Sanskrit word referrin...
Rajasarshapa
Rājasarṣapa (राजसर्षप) is a Sanskrit word referring to Brassica nigra (black mustard), from ...
Shirisha
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Pippalyadi
Pippalyādi (पिप्पल्यादि) is the Sanskrit name for a group of medicinal plants, classified as...
Sasapa Sutta
Sāsapa, (cp. Sk. sarṣapa) a mustard seed S. II, 137; V, 464; A. V, 170; J. VI, 174 (comp. wi...
Sasapa
Sāsapa, (cp. Sk. sarṣapa) a mustard seed S. II, 137; V, 464; A. V, 170; J. VI, 174 (comp. wi...
Shakavarga
Śākavarga (शाकवर्ग) is the Sanskrit name for a group of medicinal plants, classified as &ldq...
Nyasamantra
Nyāsamantra (न्यासमन्त्र).—In connection with the installation of an image; eg. ratnanyās...
Shirasa
śirasa (शिरस).—m (sarṣapa S) A kind of mustard, Sinapis dichotoma. The seed is one of the aṭhar...

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