Vikrama: 15 definitions

Introduction

Vikrama means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Vikrama (विक्रम).—A god of the ten branches of the Sukarmāṇa group of devas.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 1. 88; Vāyu-purāṇa 100. 93.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Vikrama (विक्रम) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.44.33) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Vikrama) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: The effect of Samvatsaras: Satvargas

Vikrama (विक्रम) refers to the fourteenth saṃvatsara (“jovian year)” in Vedic astrology.—The native who is born during the ‘samvatsara’ of ‘vikrama’ remains engaged in doing extremely terrible or fierce deeds, is skilled in attacking the enemy’s army, is a warrior or champion, has patience and endurance, is extremely generous and valorous or powerful.

According with Jataka Parijata, the person born in the year vikrama (2000-2001 AD) will be wealthy and valiant and command an army.

Jyotisha book cover
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Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Vyakarana (Sanskrit grammar)

Source: Wikisource: A dictionary of Sanskrit grammar

Vikrama (विक्रम).—(l) name given to a grave vowel placed between two circumflex vowels, or between a circumflex and an acute, or between an acute and a circumflex; cf. स्वरितयोर्मध्ये यत्र नीचं स्यात्, उदात्तयोर्वा अन्यतरतो वा उदात्तस्वरितयोः स विक्रमः (svaritayormadhye yatra nīcaṃ syāt, udāttayorvā anyatarato vā udāttasvaritayoḥ sa vikramaḥ) T.Pr. XIX.I ; (2) name given to a grave vowel between a pracaya vowel and an acute or a circumflex vowel; cf. प्रचयपूर्वश्च कौण्डिन्यस्य (pracayapūrvaśca kauṇḍinyasya) T.Pr.XIX.2; (8) repetition of a word or पद (pada) as in the Krama recital of the Veda words; (4) name given to a visarjaniya which has remained intact, as for instance in यः प्राणतो निमिषतः (yaḥ prāṇato nimiṣataḥ) ; cf. R.Pr. I.5; VI.1 ; the word विक्रम (vikrama) is sometimes used in the sense of visarjaniya in general; cf.also अनिङ्गयन् विक्रममेषु कुर्यात् (aniṅgayan vikramameṣu kuryāt) R.Pr. XIII.11.

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Vyakarana (व्याकरण, vyākaraṇa) refers to Sanskrit grammar and represents one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas. Vyakarana concerns itself with the rules of Sanskrit grammar and linguistic analysis in order to establish the correct context of words and sentences.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous (V) next»] — Vikrama in Kavya glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Kathāsaritsāgara

Vikrama (विक्रम) is the name of a Vidyādhara who fought on Śrutaśarman’s side in the war against Sūryaprabha, according to the Kathāsaritsāgara, chapter 48. Accordingly: “... when Śrutaśarman saw that, he quickly sent other ten lords of the Vidyādharas, chiefs of lords of hosts or lords of hosts of warriors,... and Vikrama [and seven others], the eight similar sons of the Vasus born in the house of Makaranda”.

The story of Vikrama was narrated by the Vidyādhara king Vajraprabha to prince Naravāhanadatta in order to relate how “Sūryaprabha, being a man, obtain of old time the sovereignty over the Vidyādharas”.

The Kathāsaritsāgara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Vikrama, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravāhanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyādharas (celestial beings). The work is said to have been an adaptation of Guṇāḍhya’s Bṛhatkathā consisting of 100,000 verses, which in turn is part of a larger work containing 700,000 verses.

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Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Arcana-dipika - 3rd Edition

Vikrama (विक्रम) is the fourteenth of sixty years (saṃvatsara) in the Vedic lunar calendar according to the Arcana-dīpikā by Vāmana Mahārāja (cf. Appendix).—Accordingl, There are sixty different names for each year in the Vedic lunar calendar, which begins on the new moon day (Amāvasyā) after the appearance day of Śrī Caitanya Mahāprabhu (Gaura-pūrṇimā), in February or March. The Vedic year [viz., Vikrama], therefore, does not correspond exactly with the Christian solar calendar year.

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vikrama (विक्रम).—m (S) Heroism, prowess, puissance, valor. 2 or vikramāditya m (S) The name of a prince, the sovereign of Ougein, and reputed founder of an era which commenced fifty-six years before the Christian. There have been many princes of this name.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

vikrama (विक्रम).—m Heroism. The name of a prince.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vikrama (विक्रम).—1 A step, stride, pace; गतेषु लीलाञ्चितविक्रमेषु (gateṣu līlāñcitavikrameṣu) Ku.1.34; Ś.7.6; निष्पेषवन्त्यायतविक्रमाणि (niṣpeṣavantyāyatavikramāṇi) (saptapadāni) Bu. Ch.1.33; Mb.7.49.5; cf. त्रिविक्रम (trivikrama).

2) Stepping over, walking; going, gait; ततः सुमन्त्रस्त्वरितं गत्वा त्वरितविक्रमः (tataḥ sumantrastvaritaṃ gatvā tvaritavikramaḥ) Rām.1.8.5; गतैः सहावैः कलहंसविक्रमम् (gataiḥ sahāvaiḥ kalahaṃsavikramam) Ki.8.29.

3) Overcoming, overpowering.

4) Heroism, prowess, heroic valour; अनुत्सेकः खलु विक्रमालंकारः (anutsekaḥ khalu vikramālaṃkāraḥ) V.1; R.12.87, 93.

5) Name of a celebrated king of Ujjayinī.

6) Name of Viṣṇu.

7) Strength, power.

8) Intensity.

9) Stability.

1) A kind of grave accent.

11) Non-change of the विसर्ग (visarga) into an उष्मन् (uṣman).

12) The third astrological house.

Derivable forms: vikramaḥ (विक्रमः).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Vikrama (विक्रम).—(1) nt. (for Sanskrit m.), valor: °maṃ, n. sg., Mv i.78.16, as one of 8 samudācāra (q.v., 1); (2) foot (so Sanskrit Lex.), or footstep (compare the meaning step, stride in Sanskrit): govikrama-saṃsthānaṃ, shaped like a cow's foot(-step), Divy 640.19, of the Pūrvāṣāḍha-nakṣatra; so gaja-vikrama- saṃsthānaṃ 21, of the Uttarāṣāḍhanakṣatra.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vikrama (विक्रम).—m.

(-maḥ) 1. Heroism, prowess, heroic valour. 2. Great power or strength. 3. Walking, going, proceeding. 4. Overpowering, overcoming. 5. Strength in general. 6. A step, a stride, (as in trivikrama .) 7. The name of a sovereign of Ougein: see vikramāditya. E. vi before, kram to go, to move, to walk, aff. ac .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vikrama (विक्रम).—[vi-kram + a], m. 1. A step, [Johnson's Selections from the Mahābhārata.] 95, 67; [Śākuntala, (ed. Böhtlingk.)] [distich] 165. 2. Proceeding. [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 3, 214 (v. r.). 3. Overpowering. 4. Great strength, [Johnson's Selections from the Mahābhārata.] 48, 82. 5. Strength, [Hitopadeśa] ii. [distich] 84 (with kṛ, To use one’s strength). 6. Heroism, [Vikramorvaśī, (ed. Bollensen.)] 11, 12; [Pañcatantra] ii. [distich] 146; in the title of the drama, vikramorvaśī, i. e. vikrama-urvaśi, f. Urvaśī, gained by heroism. 7. A proper name.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vikrama (विक्रम).—[masculine] step, stride, going, gait; bold advance, valour, might.

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Vikrāma (विक्राम).—[masculine] a step’s width.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Aufrecht Catalogus Catalogorum

Vikrama (विक्रम) as mentioned in Aufrecht’s Catalogus Catalogorum:—son of Sāṅgaṇa: Nemidūta kāvya.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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