Vikhyata, Vikhyāta, Vikhyātā: 16 definitions

Introduction:

Vikhyata means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

Alternative spellings of this word include Vikhyat.

In Hinduism

Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Vikhyāta (विख्यात) refers to “that which is (famously) known as”, according to the 9th-century Sarvajñānottaratantra chapter 18.—Accordingly, “Next, I shall teach the best observance among observances, which is known (vikhyāta) as the Śiva-vrata and which is revered by Asuras and Gods alike. Pure pale ash [should be used, and] white dress and unguents; he should wear a white sacred thread and be adorned by a chignon of matted locks. He should be equipped with all [suitable] ornaments, [and] adorned with white garlands; he should consume [only the pure ritual gruel-offering known as] caru; he should observe the chaste conduct of a student; he should venerate Śiva, the fire and his Guru. [...]”.

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Vikhyātā (विख्याता) refers to “having celebrated” (the form of a deity), according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—Accordingly, [verse 10.7cd-17ab, while describing the worship of Bhairavī and Bhairava]—“[Bhairavī] has the appearance of vermillion or lac. [...] [She is] called Icchāśakti [and she] moves toward union with one’s own will. Having celebrated this form (vikhyātāvikhyātāmetadrūpadharāṃ), [the Mantrin] thinks of her as Aghoreśī. In all Tantras [this] is taught and secret. It is not made clear. My abode is visible by anyone on earth, [but] difficult to obtain. [...]”.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Vikhyata in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Vikhyāta (विख्यात) refers to “one who is famous”, according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.4.3 (“The boyhood sports of Kārttikeya”).—Accordingly, as sage Viśvāmitra said to Śiva’s son: “Listen, O dear, I am not a Brahmin. I am a Kṣatriya, son of Gādhi, famous (vikhyāta) as Viśvāmitra and a servant of Brahmins. O excellent boy, I have thus narrated my life to you. Who are you? Now mention everything about your life to me who am surprised”.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: ORA: Amanaska (king of all yogas): (shaktism)

Vikhyāta (विख्यात) refers to “that which is known as”, according to the 17th century Kaulagajamardana (“crushing the Kaula elephant”) authored by Kāśīnātha or Kṛṣṇānandācala.—Accordingly, [as Īśvara said to Pārvatī]: “Listen, O Pārvatī, I shall give a critique of the Pāṣaṇḍas. Knowing this, a wise man is not defeated by them. [...] He who wears ash from the cremation ground and delights in wine and flesh; he who performs such [rites] as bathing and the junctures for [mere] worldly rewards; and he who is the vilest [of them all,] having become a hater of Viṣṇu, destroys everything; [all of them] are called (vikhyāta) Pāṣaṇḍas. [Now,] my dear, hear about the Kāpālika. [...]”

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Sports, Arts and Entertainment (wordly enjoyments)

[«previous next»] — Vikhyata in Arts glossary
Source: archive.org: Syainika Sastra of Rudradeva with English Translation (art)

Vikhyāta (विख्यात) refers to “distinguished” (champions), according to the Śyainika-śāstra: a Sanskrit treatise dealing with the divisions and benefits of Hunting and Hawking, written by Rājā Rudradeva (or Candradeva) in possibly the 13th century.—Accordingly, [while discussing the outlines of hawking]: “The arrangements should be made thus: From the very first watch of the night until the morning clouds of autumn surround the sun, a large number of soldiers should be posted far and wide on all sides to guard against intrusion of other people, while: the king himself, surrrounded by a few distinguished and faithful champions (vikhyāta-vīra), [...]”.

Arts book cover
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This section covers the skills and profiencies of the Kalas (“performing arts”) and Shastras (“sciences”) involving ancient Indian traditions of sports, games, arts, entertainment, love-making and other means of wordly enjoyments. Traditionally these topics were dealt with in Sanskrit treatises explaing the philosophy and the justification of enjoying the pleasures of the senses.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vikhyāta (विख्यात).—p (S) Renowned, famous, celebrated.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

vikhyāta (विख्यात).—p Famous, renowned. vikhyāti f Celebrity, renown.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vikhyāta (विख्यात).—p. p.

1) Renowned, well-known, celebrated, famous.

2) Called, named.

3) Avowed, confessed.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Vikhyāta (विख्यात).—m., a high number: Mahāvyutpatti 7724 = Tibetan grags (fame) yas; compare vikhata.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vikhyāta (विख्यात).—mfn.

(-taḥ-tā-taṃ) 1. Known, famous. 2. Avowed, confessed. E. vi before, khyā to say or tell, aff. kta .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vikhyāta (विख्यात).—[adjective] universally known; renowned or known as, called ([nominative] [with] iti).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vikhyāta (विख्यात):—[=vi-khyāta] [from vi-khyā] mfn. generally known, notorious, famous, celebrated, [Yājñavalkya; Rāmāyaṇa] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] known as, called, named, [Mahābhārata; Rāmāyaṇa; Hitopadeśa]

3) [v.s. ...] avowed, confessed, [Horace H. Wilson]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vikhyāta (विख्यात):—[vi-khyāta] (taḥ-tā-taṃ) a. Famous.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Vikhyāta (विख्यात) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Vikhyāya.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Vikhyata in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Vikhyāta (विख्यात) [Also spelled vikhyat]:—(a) renowned well-known, famous, reputed, celebrated.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Vikhyāta (ವಿಖ್ಯಾತ):—[adjective] generally known; famous; celebrated.

--- OR ---

Vikhyāta (ವಿಖ್ಯಾತ):—

1) [noun] = ವಿಖ್ಯಾತಿ [vikhyati].

2) [noun] a famous man; a celebrity.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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