Venu, aka: Veṇu, Veṇū; 19 Definition(s)

Introduction

Venu means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Veṇu (वेणु): a Musical Instrument.—The Ṛgveda mentions Vāṇa and Das. suggests the Veṇu might have been a later corruption of Vāṇa. But there is no definite opinion on this point. In the Jātakas, however, the Veṇu or flute is found to be a popular wind instrument. The epics also mention Veṇu. The Vāyu-purāṇa associates it with the Kurus already mentioned above.

Source: Google Books: Cultural History from the Vāyu Purāna

Veṇu (वेणु) refers to a “musical instruments” that existed in ancient Kashmir (Kaśmīra) as mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa.—The Nīlamata says that the land of Kaśmīra was thronged with ever-sportive and joyful people enjoying continuous festivities. Living amidst scenes of sylvan beauty they played, danced and sang to express their joys, to mitigate their pains, to please their gods and to appease their demons.

The Nīlamata refers to Veṇu once only in connection with the celebrations of the Awakening of god Viṣṇu.

Source: archive.org: Nilamata Purana: a cultural and literary study

Veṇu (वेणु).—Flute;1 in Rāma's abhiṣeka;2 in Pātālam.3

  • 1) Vāyu-purāṇa 45. 40; 56. 32; 104. 48; Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 14. 32.
  • 2) Ib. IV. 4. 99.
  • 3) Ib. II. 5. 11.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Veṇū (वेणू) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. II.48.2) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Veṇū) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Muraḷi or Veṇu (वेणु) is a flute made, as its name indicates, from a thin and hollow bamboo. In a piece of bamboo, suitably chosen holes are bored in proper places. By blowing in the hole which is near to the closed end and stopping one or more of the other holes with the fingers as required, music of a very high standard of perfection is often elicited from this simple instrument.

Source: Google Books: Elements of Hindu iconography

Venu or Murali refers to a type of musical instrument, representing one of the several “attributes” (āyudha) or “accessories” of a detiy commonly seen depicted in Hindu iconography, defined according to texts dealing with śilpa (arts and crafs), known as śilpaśāstras.—Venu or Murali is a flute made, as its name indicates, from a thin and hollow bamboo. In a piece of bamboo, suitably chosen, holes are bored in proper places. By blowing in the hole which is near the closed end and stopping one or more of the other holes with the fingers as required, music of a very high standard of perfection is often elicited from this simple instrument.

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)
Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Veṇu (वेणु) refers to one of the thirty-three alaṃkāras (embellishments), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 29. These alaṃkāras, or, ‘embellishments of song’, depend upon the four types of varṇas, which refers to a specific order of musical notes (svara). They are attached to the songs of seven forms, although not generally used in the dhruvās.

According to the Nāṭyaśāstra, “veṇu is that in which the tempo (laya) is playlike”.

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra
Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Veṇu (वेणु) refers to one of the ten kinds of sounds (śabda) according to the Padārthādarśā of Rāghavabhaṭṭa, the Matsyendrasaṃhitā and the Haṃsa-upaniṣad.

Source: academia.edu: The Yoga of the Mālinīvijayottaratantra
Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Veṇu (वेणु) refers to “bamboo” and represents one of the seven forest-products that are fit for oblation according to verse 25.59 of the Īśvarasaṃhitā, dealing with the classification of the places for building the fire-pits (kuṇḍa). Accordingly, “bamboo (veṇu), śyāmāka, nīvāra (wild gram), jartila, gavīdhuka, karkaṭa and kanaka are the seven which grow in the forest. Śāli is important among them. Others are to be taken in its absence, or that of others”.

Source: archive.org: Isvara Samhita Vol 5
Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Veṇu (वेणु) in the Atharvaveda and later denotes a ‘reed’ of bamboo. It is described in the Taittirīya-saṃhitā as ‘hollow’ (su-ṣira). In the Rigveda it occurs only in a Vālakhilya hymn in a Dānastuti (‘praise of gifts’), where Roth thinks that ‘ flutes of reed ’ are meant, a sense which Veṇu has in the later texts. The Kauṣītaki-brāhmaṇa couples Veṇu with Sasya, stating that they ripen in Vasanta, ‘spring’. Apparently bamboo reeds are meant.

Source: archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

In Buddhism

Theravada (major branch of Buddhism)

A river in Ceylon, on the way from Anuradhapura to Dakkhinadesa. It lay between the Tissavapi and Jajjaranadi. VibhA. p. 446.

Source: Pali Kanon: Pali Proper Names
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Theravāda is a major branch of Buddhism having the the Pali canon (tipitaka) as their canonical literature, which includes the vinaya-pitaka (monastic rules), the sutta-pitaka (Buddhist sermons) and the abhidhamma-pitaka (philosophy and psychology).

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Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Veṇu (वेणु) refers to one of the four bodhivṛkṣadevatās “deity of the Bodhi-tree” according to the according to the 2nd century Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter VI). In the Lalitavistara the bodhivṛkṣadevatās are four in number: Veṇu, Valgu, Sumanas and Ojāpati. In the same place, there is a detailed description of the bodhi tree.

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
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Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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India history and geogprahy

Venu, Vamsa or Kicaka is the name of a tree mentioned in the Kathasaritsagara by Somadeva (10th century A.D).—Venu refers to the “Bamboo-tree” and its woods in the Vindhya mountains and great and marvellous forests on the Hemakuta peak of the Himalaya mountain are mentioned.

Somadeva mentions many rich forests, gardens, various trees (eg., Venu), creepers medicinal and flowering plants and fruit-bearing trees in the Kathasaritsagara. Travel through the thick, high, impregnable and extensive Vindhya forest is a typical feature of many travel-stories. Somadeva’s writing more or less reflects the life of the people of Northern India during the 11th century. His Kathasaritsagara (‘ocean of streams of story’), mentioning Venu, is a famous Sanskrit epic story revolving around prince Naravahanadatta and his quest to become the emperor of the vidyadharas (celestial beings).

Source: Shodhganga: Cultural history as g leaned from kathasaritsagara
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

veṇu : (m.) bamboo.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Veṇu, (cp. Vedic veṇu. Another P, form is veḷu (q. v.)) bamboo; occurs only in cpds. e.g. —°gumba thicket of bamboo DhA. I, 177; —°tinduka the tree Diospyros J. V, 405 (=timbaru C.); —°daṇḍaka jungle-rope J. III, 204; —°bali a tax to be paid in bamboo (by bamboo workers) DhA. I, 177; °-vana bamboo forest J. V, 38. (Page 647)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

vēṇu (वेणु).—m S A bamboo. 2 A bamboo flute or pipe.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vēṇu (वेणु).—m Bamboo; a bamboo flute or pipe.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Veṇu (वेणु).—[veṇ-uṇ Uṇ.3.38]

1) A bamboo; मलयेऽपि स्थितो वेणुर्वेणुरेव न चन्दनम् (malaye'pi sthito veṇurveṇureva na candanam) Subhāṣ; R.12.41.

2) A reed, cane; प्राप्तापराधास्ताड्याः स्यू रज्ज्वा वेणुदलेन वा (prāptāparādhāstāḍyāḥ syū rajjvā veṇudalena vā) Ms.8.299.

3) A flute, pipe; वेणुं क्वणन्तीं क्रीडन्तीम् (veṇuṃ kvaṇantīṃ krīḍantīm) Bhāg.1.3.18; नामसमेतं कृतसंकेतं वादयते मृदु वेणुम् (nāmasametaṃ kṛtasaṃketaṃ vādayate mṛdu veṇum) Gīt.5.

4) A banner;. त्रिवेणुं पञ्चबन्धुरम् (triveṇuṃ pañcabandhuram) (ratham) Bhāg.4.26.1; cf. त्रिवेणु (triveṇu).

Derivable forms: veṇuḥ (वेणुः).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Veṇu (वेणु).—n. of one of the 4 devatās of the bodhivṛkṣa: LV 278.10.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 60 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Venuyava
Veṇuyava (वेणुयव).—bamboo-seed. Derivable forms: veṇuyavaḥ (वेणुयवः).Veṇuyava is a Sanskrit com...
Venubija
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Venuvana
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Venugrama
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Venu-vanam
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Venuvadaka
Veṇuvādaka (वेणुवादक).—a piper, flute-player.Derivable forms: veṇuvādakaḥ (वेणुवादकः).Veṇuvādak...
Venukarkara
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Venuvada
Veṇuvāda (वेणुवाद).—a piper, flute-player.Derivable forms: veṇuvādaḥ (वेणुवादः).Veṇuvāda is a S...
Venunisruti
Veṇunisruti (वेणुनिस्रुति).—the sugar-cane. Derivable forms: veṇunisrutiḥ (वेणुनिस्रुतिः).Veṇun...
Venuja
Veṇuja (वेणुज).—bamboo-seed. Derivable forms: veṇujaḥ (वेणुजः).Veṇuja is a Sanskrit compound co...
Trivenu
Triveṇu (त्रिवेणु).—1) The staff (tridaṇḍa) of a Saṃnyāsin; केचित् त्रिवेणुं जगृहुरेके पात्रं क...
Kvanitavenu
Kvaṇitaveṇu (क्वणितवेणु).—a. one who has breathed the flute; श्रुत्वा च तत्क्वणितवेणुविचित्रगीत...
Angaravenu
Aṅgāraveṇu (अङ्गारवेणु).—[karma.] a sort of bamboo. Derivable forms: aṅgāraveṇuḥ (अङ्गारवेणुः)....
Venuyashti
Veṇuyaṣṭi (वेणुयष्टि).—f. a bamboo-stick. Derivable forms: veṇuyaṣṭiḥ (वेणुयष्टिः).Veṇuyaṣṭi is...
Venudhma
Veṇudhma (वेणुध्म).—a flute-player, piper; मार्द- ङ्गिकाश्च वेणुध्माः (mārda- ṅgikāśca veṇudhmā...

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