Guha, aka: Guhā, Gūhā; 17 Definition(s)

Introduction

Guha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

[Guha in Shilpashastra glossaries]

Guha (additional aspect of Subrahmaṇya, according to the Śrītatvanidhi) should have one face, three eyes and four arms. His head should be adorned with a kirīṭa made of gold set with rubies. In the right hands there should be the vajra and the śula and the left hands should be held in the varada and the abhaya poses. His Devī should be by his side and they should look like a newly married couple.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Elements of Hindu Iconograpy
Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Purana

[Guha in Purana glossaries]

1a) Guha (गुह).—(God Subrahmaṇya, Senāpati) a son of Ambikā (Pārvati) was born as Sāmba, son of Kṛṣṇa. Tīrtha sacred to, in the Sarasvatī visited by Vidura.1 Guha is said to hve shot arrows at Krauñca hill.2 Fought with Tāraka in the Devāsura war and with Pradyumna at Śonitapura.3 Relieved Mucukunda defending Heaven.4 With peacock as riding animal, defended Tripurāri's chariot; birth of, in a Śaravana, as a baby of seven days killed Asura Tāraka.5 Weapon Śakti.6

  • 1) Bhāgavata-purāṇa III. 1. 22. and 30. Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 24. 4; IV. 30. 104; Vāyu-purāṇa 30. 315; 39. 55, 41. 40; Viṣṇu-purāṇa V. 33. 26.
  • 2) Bhāgavata-purāṇa V. 20. 19.
  • 3) Ib. VIII. 10. 28; X. 63. 7.
  • 4) Ib. 51. 16.
  • 5) Matsya-purāṇa 133. 64; 140. 40; 146. 10-11; 266. 42.
  • 6) Viṣṇu-purāṇa III. 2. 12.

1b) The ruler of kingdoms Kalinga, Mahiṣa, Mahendranilaya, etc.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 74. 198; Vāyu-purāṇa 99. 386.

1c) Rule over Kalinga, Māhiṣa, and Mahendra hill regions.*

  • * Viṣṇu-purāṇa IV. 24. 65.

2) Guhā (गुहा).—Cave (golden) in Kuhariṇi in Meru where Vyāsa composed the four Vedas having conquered hunger, mind and āsana; after one hundred years of contemplation the Vedas came to him in their full form.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 104. 67-9.
(Source): Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

[Guha in Natyashastra glossaries]

Guha (गुह) is the Sanskrit name for a deity to be worshipped during raṅgapūjā, according to the Nāṭyaśāstra 3.1-8. Accordingly, the master of the dramatic art who has been initiated for the purpose shall consecrate the playhouse after he has made obeisance (eg., to Guha).

(Source): Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra
Natyashastra book cover
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Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[Guha in Shaktism glossaries]

Guha (गुह) refers to one of the 53 gods to be worshipped and given pāyasa (rice boiled in milk) according to the Vāstuyāga rite in Śaktism (cf. Śāradātilaka-tantra III-V). The worship of these 53 gods happens after assigning them to one of the 64 compartment while constructing a Balimaṇḍapa. Vāstu is the name of a prodigious demon, who was killed by 53 gods (eg., Guha).

(Source): Wisdom Library: Śāktism
Shaktism book cover
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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Itihasa (narrative history)

[Guha in Itihasa glossaries]

Guha (गुह) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. ) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Guha) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

(Source): JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places
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Itihasa (इतिहास, itihāsa) refers to ‘epic history’ and represents a branch of Sanskrit literature which popularly includes 1) the eighteen major Puranas, 2) the Mahabharata and 3) the Ramayana. It is a branch of Vedic Hinduism categorised as smriti literature (‘that which is remembered’) as opposed to shruti literature (‘that which is transmitted verbally’).

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Nirukta (Sanskrit etymology)

[Guha in Nirukta glossaries]

Guhā (गुहा, “cave”).—Thus, guh (darkness) is the dhātu (root) of guhā. The Sanskrit synonyms for guhā are guhya (secret), guhyatā (secret worthiness or confidentiality), guhyam (confidential subject), guhyatamam (the most confidential), guhyataram (still more confidential), guhyanām (of secrets), goha (a lair or hiding place), and gu (darkness). The cognate words [of guhā] are garbha and gṛha. Of these, the former is synonymous to womb, foetus, embryo, inner apartment, interior chamber, hole, and hollow. The full range of semantics shares many things: guhā, guhya, gehe, garbha, gṛha, and garbhagṛha.

(Source): Shodhganga: Ajanta’s antiquity (nirukta)
context information

Nirukta (निरुक्त) or “etymology” refers to the linguistic analysis of the Sanskrit language. This branch studies the interpretation of common and ancient words and explains them in their proper context. Nirukta is one of the six additional sciences (vedanga) to be studied along with the Vedas.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

[Guha in Hinduism glossaries]

Guha (गुह): King of Nishādha

(Source): WikiPedia: Hinduism

Guhā (गुहा, “cave”).—The Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa 11.2.6.5 equates the guhā with the heart. In the Śvetāśvatara-upaṇiṣad 3.20 the macrocosmic and microcosmic soul resided in the guhā or deeps of being. In a cave, psyche finds the hidden that smiles in its dream of deep meditation. The cave is called a guhā as the categories of knower, knowledge, and knowable are hidden herein, or the soul secrets in it (Vācaspatya lexicon). Bhāgavata-Purāṇa 2.9.24 says: The Divine Being, the Lord of all beings dwells in the guhā. Brāhmaṇ resides in the guhā, the supreme space (lndiche Studien 2.217). Guhārāja is the best temple-form in Varahamihira's Bṛhatsamhitā 56.18.25.

(Source): Shodhganga: Ajanta’s antiquity (h)

In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

[Guha in Buddhism glossaries]

Guhā (गुहा, “cave”) is the angelic guardian of a person and hence the name Guhāgupta for a Bodhisattva in the Mahāvyutpatti and the Sadharma-puṇḍarika-sūtra. Divinities are located in a cave within a stūpa. In sādhana 191 of the Sādhanamālā 2.394 the goddess, Uṣṇiṣa-vijā sits in a cavern in the caitya. Cave is the solitary vision beyond reflections, where time falls into the timeless. The solemnity of its original silence--deep, dark, oneiric, unfathomable-has so many lessons for meditation. We are hypnotised by solitude, hypnotised by the gaze in a solitary cave. The intimacy of concentration therein leads us to the light on the far horizon. Small caves without murals or relief served as places for austere meditation. In Tibet, there are caves near monasteries for meditation-retreats.

(Source): Shodhganga: Ajanta’s antiquity (b)

India history and geogprahy

[Guha in India history glossaries]

1) Guha (गुह) is an example of a Śaivite and  Vaiṣṇavite name mentioned in the Gupta inscriptions. Classification of personal names according to deities (eg., from Śaivism and Vaiṣṇavism) were sometimes used by more than one person and somehow seem to have been popular. The Gupta empire (r. 3rd-century CE), founded by Śrī Gupta, covered much of ancient India and embraced the Dharmic religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. Derivation of personal names (eg., Guha) during the rule of the Guptas followed patterns such as tribes, places, rivers and mountains.

2) Guha (गुह) ruled over the whole of Kaliṅga and the neighbouring regions. Guha belonged to the Sālaṅkāyana family of brāhmaṇas. Samudragupta installed him as his viceroy in Kaliṅga. Guha was already reigning over Kaliṅga (with his capital at Piṣṭapura) when Samudragupta conquered him and placed him as his feudatory. “Mahendragiri” may have been another name given to him on account of the extension of his dominion over the Mahendra mountain. It is interesting to note that Kālidāsa (Raghuvaṃśa 4.43) refers to Raghu defeating a king named Mahendranatha in the course of his southern campaign.It is tempting to connect Mahendranatha with Mahendragiri. After the victory of Samudragupta, Guha was confirmed in the enjoyment of sovereignty under the imperial tutelage.

(Source): archive.org: Personal and geographical names in the Gupta inscriptions

Guhā (गुहा) refers to a “cave”, to which the Buddhists, the Jains and the Hindus resort to for ascetic practices.—The word for cave in Sanskrit is guhā, which means many things in English: a pit, cavern, hiding-place, secretly, in secret, confidential, intellect, and heart. Thus, guh (darkness) is the dhātu (root) of guhā. The cognate words are garbha and gṛha. Thus, the guhā connotes a house, shrine, or womb-like entity; it is the inner space, a secret region, as opposed to outer spaces, entities, or conditions. In such inner recesses, the primordial being or the source of life resides. Guhā is the microcosmic space, as opposed to the macrocosmic space of the outside world. What garbha is to the human body gṛha and guhā are to the world of habitation.

In guhā resides the one who is withdrawn from the world, who goes back to the inner recesses of the mind. In guhā, resides the soul, the atman of the jīva.

(Source): Shodhganga: Ajanta’s antiquity
India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[Guha in Pali glossaries]

guhā : (f.) a cave; cavern.

(Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Guhā, (f.) (Vedic guhā, guh, gūhati to hide (q. v.) Dhtp 337: saṃvaraṇa) a hiding place, a cave, cavern (cp. kandara & see giriguhā); fig. the heart (in °āsaya). According to Bdhgh. (on Vin.I, 58, see Vin. Texts I.174) “a hut of bricks, or in a rock, or of wood.” Vin.I, 58, 96, 107, 239, 284; II, 146; III, 155; IV, 48 (cp. sattapaṇṇi-guhā); Sn.772, 958; J.II, 418; VI, 574; Vv 5016.

—āsaya hiding in the heart; or the shelter of the heart A.IV, 98 (maccupāso+); J.V, 367 (id.); Dh.37 (cittaṃ; see DhA.I, 304). (Page 253)

(Source): Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

[Guha in Marathi glossaries]

guhā (गुहा).—f (S) A cave or cavern.

(Source): DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

guhā (गुहा).—f A cave or cavern.

(Source): DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

[Guha in Sanskrit glossaries]

Guha (गुह).—[guh-ka]

1) An epithet of Kārtikeya; गुह इवाप्रतिहतशक्तिः (guha ivāpratihataśaktiḥ) K.8; Ku.5.14.

2) A horse.

3) Name of a Chāṇḍāla or Niṣāda, king of Śṛṅgaver and a friend of Rāma.

4) An epithet of Viṣṇu; also of Śiva.

Derivable forms: guhaḥ (गुहः).

--- OR ---

Guhā (गुहा).—

1) A cave, cavern, hiding-place; गुहानिबद्धप्रतिशब्ददीर्घम् (guhānibaddhapratiśabdadīrgham) R.2.28.51; धर्मस्य तत्त्वं निहित गुहायाम् (dharmasya tattvaṃ nihita guhāyām) Mb.

2) Hiding, concealing.

3) A pit, hole in the ground.

4) The heart; Śvet. Up.3.2; भगवान्सर्वभूतानामध्यक्षोऽवस्थितो गुहाम् (bhagavānsarvabhūtānāmadhyakṣo'vasthito guhām) Bhāg.2.9.24.

5) Intellect; विद्धि त्वमेतन्निहितं गुहायाम् (viddhi tvametannihitaṃ guhāyām) Kaṭh.1.14; भद्रं वोऽस्तु निहितं यद्गुहायाम् (bhadraṃ vo'stu nihitaṃ yadguhāyām) Mb.1.191.25.

--- OR ---

Gūhā (गूहा).—Concealing, hiding; विलोक्य मुमुहे सद्यः स इव ज्ञानगूहया (vilokya mumuhe sadyaḥ sa iva jñānagūhayā) Bhāg.3.26.5.

See also (synonyms): gūhana.

(Source): DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

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