Vyadhin, Vyādhī, Vyādhi, Vyādhin, Vyadhi: 38 definitions

Introduction:

Vyadhin means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany

Vyādhī (व्याधी) refers to “disease”. The term is used throughout Ayurvedic literature such as the Suśruta-saṃhitā and the Caraka-saṃhitā.

Source: Hand book of domestic medicine: Basic principles of Āyurveda

Vyādhi (व्याधि):—All the diseases are classified into 3 major groups viz.

  1. Nija Roga,
  2. Āgantuja Roga
  3. and Mānasa Roga.

The diseases caused by the vitiation of Vāta, Pitta and Kapha are called Nija Roga; the diseases due to the trauma, bite etc. are Āgantuja Roga; and mental diseases are Mānasa Roga.

The diseases are also classified in 3 groups viz.

  1. Ādhyātmika,
  2. Ādhibhautika
  3. and Ādhidaivika.

The condition which causes uneasiness to Śarīra (body) or Mana (mind) is defined as Vyādhi or disease. It is produced by the three factors viz.

  1. Asātmyendriyārtha Saṃyoga,
  2. Prajñāparādha
  3. and Pariṇāma.
Source: Knowledge Traditions & Practices of India: Agriculture: A Survey

Vyādhi (व्याधि, “disease”).—Parāśara used the word ‘disease’ in Sanskrit (vyādhi) to differentiate from visible pests. He even listed goats, wild boars, pigs, deer, buffaloes, parakeets and sparrows among pests. Varāhamihira’s chapter on treatment of trees mentioned that trees are vulnerable to disease (vyādhi) when exposed to cold weather, strong winds, and hot sun; this possibly laid the foundation of classifying tree diseases based on humours such as vata, pitta and kapha (the tridoṣa of Āyurveda), which were formalized in later centuries in Surapāla’s Vṛkṣāyurveda.

Ayurveda book cover
context information

Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

1) Vyādhi (व्याधि, “sickness”).—One of the thirty-three vyabhicāribhāva (transitory states), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 7. These ‘transitory states’ accompany the ‘permanent state’ in co-operation. The term is used throughout nāṭyaśāstra literature. (Also see the Daśarūpa 4.8-9)

2) Vyādhi (व्याधि, “sickness”) refers to the eighth of the ten stages of love (kāma) arising in a woman (strī) and men (puṃs) alike, according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 24.

Source: archive.org: Natya Shastra

1) Vyādhi (व्याधि, “disease”) owes it origin to an attack of three humours such as wind (vāta), biles (pitta) and phlegm (kapha). Fever and similar other illnesses are special varieties of it.

Fever is of two kinds, viz.: (1) that with a feeling of cold (śīta-vyādhi) and (2) that with a feeling of heat (dāha-vyādhi). The other types of sicknesses are to be represented on the stage by consequents such as narrowing down the mouth, dullness of the body, deep breathing, making peculiar sounds, crying, tremor and the like.

2) Vyādhi (व्याधि).—One of the ten stages of love (kāma);—When after enjoying all objects fit for one in love, and even by desirable sprinkling, one fails to bring her condition under control, Sickness (vyādhi) appears. To represent Sickness, the eighth stage one is to show that she faints, the heart has no point on which to settle, the head aches badly, and one does not have any peace.

Note: Śāradātanaya’s Bhāvaprakāśana, p. 90. l.16-18. has ātaṅka (disquietude) which precedes unmāda.

3) Vyādhi (व्याधि).—Death from an attack of disease (vyādhi) should be represented by an occurrence of hiccup, hard breathing and imperceptible movement of limbs which should be relaxed.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

Vyādhi (व्याधि).—Vyādhi, Jarā, Śokā, Tṛṣṇā and Krodhā, were the daughters of Mṛtyu (Death). (Agni Purāṇa, Chapter 20).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Vyādhi (व्याधि).—A son of Mṛtyu.*

  • * Vāyu-purāṇa 10. 41.
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Kavyashastra (science of poetry)

Source: Shodhganga: Bhismacaritam a critical study

Vyādhi (व्याधि) refers to one of the different Bhāvas employed in the Bhīṣmacarita (Bhishma Charitra) which is a mahākāvya (‘epic poem’) written by Hari Narayan Dikshit.— The example of vyādhi-bhāva is VIII.9.—Here we can see the merciful condition of King Śāntanu on separation fron his beloved Satyavatī. His body loses its charm, it’s routine and thus becomes weak. Thus the sense of Vyādhi is expressed in the painful condition of King Śāntanu.

Kavyashastra book cover
context information

Kavyashastra (काव्यशास्त्र, kāvyaśāstra) refers to the ancient Indian tradition of poetry (kavya). Canonical literature (shastra) of the includes encyclopedic manuals dealing with prosody, rhetoric and various other guidelines serving to teach the poet how to compose literature.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Vyādhin (व्याधिन्) refers to “one who is (always) ill”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, while describing the signs of one who is not a Siddha: “He is excessively tall, bald, deformed, short, dwarfish, his nose is ugly or he has black teeth and is wrathful . Some of his limbs are missing and is deceitful, cripple and deformed, foolish, inauspicious, envious, deluded, badly behaved, and violent; without any teacher, he is devoid of the rites, he maligns the Krama without cause, he is not devoted to the Siddhas, he (always) suffers and is without wisdom. He is (always) ill [i.e., vyādhin] and one should know that he is (always) attached (to worldly objects) and has no scripture. He has no energy and is dull and lazy. Ugly, he lives by cheating and, cruel, he is deluded, and devoid of (any) sense of reality. Such is the characteristic of one who is not accomplished (asiddha) in a past life”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Jyotisha (astronomy and astrology)

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Vyādhin (व्याधिन्) refers to “one who suffers from disease”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 3), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “The dark spots, also known as ketus, the sons of Rāhu are Tāmasa, Kīlaka and the like, and are 33 in number. How they affect the earth depends upon their color, position and shape. [...] If the spots should be of the shape of a rod the prince dies; if of the shape of a headless body mankind will suffer from disease [i.e., vyādhin]; if of the shape of a crow they will suffer from robbers; and if of the shape of a pike, they will suffer from famine”.

Source: Wisdom Library: Brihat Samhita by Varahamihira

Vyādhi (व्याधि) refers to “diseases”, according to the Bṛhatsaṃhitā (chapter 9), an encyclopedic Sanskrit work written by Varāhamihira mainly focusing on the science of ancient Indian astronomy astronomy (Jyotiṣa).—Accordingly, “If she [=Venus] should enter the constellation of Anurādhā, rulers will be at strife; if she should enter the constellation of Jyeṣṭhā, the chief rulers will suffer; if she should enter the constellation of Mūla, physicians that deal in medicinal plants will suffer. In each of these three cases there will be drought in the land. If Venus (Śukra) should enter the constellation of Pūrvāṣādha, the creatures of water will suffer; if she should enter the constellation of Uttarāṣādha, diseases will increase. If she should enter the constellation of Śravaṇa, diseases of the ear [i.e., śravaṇa-vyādhi] will afflict mankind. If she should enter the constellation of Dhaniṣṭhā, heretics will suffer”.

Jyotisha book cover
context information

Jyotisha (ज्योतिष, jyotiṣa or jyotish) refers to ‘astronomy’ or “Vedic astrology” and represents the fifth of the six Vedangas (additional sciences to be studied along with the Vedas). Jyotisha concerns itself with the study and prediction of the movements of celestial bodies, in order to calculate the auspicious time for rituals and ceremonies.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Vyādhi (व्याधि) refers to “disease”.—The moon also forms an important element of Pāśupata yogic practices. As we learn from the Skandapurāṇa (179.28ff.), as pointed out by Bakker (2015, 141), their “accomplishment in yoga” comes about through a process of withdrawing the senses until the practitioner can see a lunar disc in his heart. From the moonlight within his body, yogic powers, omniscience and the like arise. These powers include being immune to disease (vyādhi) and possessing a divine body.

Source: SOAS University of London: Protective Rites in the Netra Tantra

Vyādhin (व्याधिन्) or Vyādhibhaya refers to “(fear of) disease” and represents one of the worldly ailments, according to the Netratantra of Kṣemarāja: a Śaiva text from the 9th century in which Śiva (Bhairava) teaches Pārvatī topics such as metaphysics, cosmology, and soteriology.—The Netratantra’s Second Chapter begins with the goddess Pārvatī’s request that Śiva reveal to her the remedy for the ailments that afflict divine and worldly beings. Among these maladies she lists [e.g, fear of disease (vyādhin-bhaya)], [...]. Śiva responds that no one has ever before asked such a question and therefore he has never before revealed the answer. He emphasizes the importance of the mṛtyuñjaya-mantra and the Netra-tantra’s tripartite approaches of mantra, yoga, and jñāna (knowledge).

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Kavya (poetry)

[«previous next»] — Vyadhin in Kavya glossary
Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions (kavya)

Vyādhin (व्याधिन्) refers to “one who is diseased”, according to Bāṇa’s Kādambarī (p. 226).—There are apparently several Tantric rites that Bāṇa pejoratively associates with the priest: [...] “he had written down the [work known as ] the ‘Doctrine of Mahākāla’ instructed to him by a withered Mahāpāśupata mendicant”; “he was one in whom the disease (vyādhin) of talking about [finding] treasure had arisen”; “in him the wind [disease] of alchemy had grown”; “he entertained the deluded desire of becoming the lover of a Yakṣa maiden”.

Kavya book cover
context information

Kavya (काव्य, kavya) refers to Sanskrit poetry, a popular ancient Indian tradition of literature. There have been many Sanskrit poets over the ages, hailing from ancient India and beyond. This topic includes mahakavya, or ‘epic poetry’ and natya, or ‘dramatic poetry’.

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In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Source: Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra

Vyādhi (व्याधि, “illness”) refers to one of the various “inner torments”, according to Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter XV).—Accordingly, “There are two kinds of torments (alpābādatā), those having an external cause and those having an internal cause. The external torments are cold (śīta), heat (uṣṇa), hunger (kṣudh), thirst (pipāsā), armies (caturaṅgabala), swords (asi), knives (śastra), clubs (daṇḍa), catastrophes (patana), ruins (avamardana); all these external accidents of this kind are called torments (ādādha). The inner torments are the 404 illnesses (vyādhi) that come from improper food or irregular sleep; all the sicknesses of this kind are called inner sicknesses. Corporeal beings (dehin) all have to suffer from these two kinds of illnesses. This is why Ratnakāra asks Śākyamuni if he has but little torments and suffering”.

Source: academia.edu: A Study and Translation of the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā

Vyādhi (व्याधि) refers to “disease”, according to the Gaganagañjaparipṛcchā: the eighth chapter of the Mahāsaṃnipāta (a collection of Mahāyāna Buddhist Sūtras).—Accordingly, “Then the Bodhisattva Gaganagañja, having praised the Lord with these verses, addressed himself to the Lord: ‘[...] The Lord, having become the king of doctors (vaidyarāja), establishes the way into the state without disease (vyādhi) or death (maraṇa) for [living beings] who are involved with this world covered with desire, defilement, and obstruction (āvaraṇa) from beginningless until endless time (anavarāgra). The Lord, having had power and vitality, is skilled in the knowledge if what is proper and what is improper, and has obtained the three knowledges (trividya). [...]”.

Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

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In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Jaina Yoga

Vyādhi (व्याधि) or Vyādhibhaya refers to “fear of sickness” and represents one of the seven types of fear (bhaya), according to Cāmuṇḍarāya in his Caritrasāra. Accordingly, these seven bhayas are referred to by Cāmuṇḍarāya in connexion with niḥśaṅka, or “freedom from fear”, which represents an aspect of samyaktva (right belief) classified under the liṅga heading.

Source: The University of Sydney: A study of the Twelve Reflections

Vyādhin (व्याधिन्) refers to “disease”, according to the 11th century Jñānārṇava, a treatise on Jain Yoga in roughly 2200 Sanskrit verses composed by Śubhacandra.—Accordingly, “Having taken hold of this body in this life, suffering [com.—that which consists of pain and disease—‘ādhivyādhirūpaṃ’] is endured by you. Hence, that [body] is certainly a completely worthless abode. Whatever difficulties arise from life, they are each endured here by the embodied soul, only having taken hold of the body powerfully”.

General definition book cover
context information

Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Vyadhin in Pali glossary
Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

vyādhi : (m.) sickness; disease.

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary

1) Vyādhi, 2 (camel) see oṭṭhi°. (Page 654)

2) Vyādhi, 1 (see byādhi) sickness, malady, illness, disease A. I, 139 (as devadūta), 146, 155 sq.; III, 66; Ps. I, 59 sq.; II, 147; J. VI, 224; Vism. 236. Often in sequence jāti jarā vyādhi maraṇa, e.g. A. II, 172; III, 74 sq.; Vism. 232. (Page 654)

Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vyādhi (व्याधि).—f (S and in Sanskrit masc) pop. vyādha f Disease in general; a disease, a malady, a sickness. 2 By way of eminence. The black leprosy. 3 Freely. A trouble or difficulty; a scrape or hobble: also a bore, plague, pest. 4 Applied angrily to a mischievous or troublesome child; answering to pestilent brat, plague, torment.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

vyādhi (व्याधि) [-dha, -ध].—f A disease. The black leprosy. A trouble.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vyādhin (व्याधिन्).—a. Piercing, wounding.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Vyādhi (व्याधि).—disease (normally m.), f. Lalitavistara 351.11 (prose) avabuddhā sattva-vyādhiḥ, the disease of creatures was well understood (by the Buddha); yatra ca punar vyādhyā (gen.? or read °yāṃ, loc.?) vyupanāmyante Kāśyapa Parivarta 87.2, see s.v. upanāmayati (5), and for whatever disease they (medicines) are given; nt., Mahāvastu i.353.3 (prose) sarvaṃ ca kuṣṭha-vyādhiṃ visrutaṃ.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vyādhi (व्याधि).—m.

(-dhiḥ) 1. Sickness, disease in general, (op. to ādhi or “mental distress.”) 2. Leprosy. E. vi and āṅ before dhā to have, ki aff.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vyādhi (व्याधि).—i. e. vyadh + i, m. 1. Pain, [Mālatīmādhava, (ed. Calc.)] 69, 5. 2. Sickness, [Hitopadeśa] i. [distich] 3, M. M.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vyādhin (व्याधिन्).—i. e. vyādha + in, adj. Frequented by hunters, [Nalodya, (ed. Benary.)] 3, 35.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vyādhi (व्याधि).—[masculine] disease; ta [adjective] ill, sick.

--- OR ---

Vyādhī (व्याधी).—[feminine] care, sorrow.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vyādhin (व्याधिन्).—1. [adjective] piercing, perforating.

--- OR ---

Vyādhin (व्याधिन्).—2. v. vyādha.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vyādhi (व्याधि):—[from vyadh] a See vy-ādhi, p. 1037, col. 1.

2) [=vy-ādhi] [from vyā-dhā] b m. (less probably from √vyadh, p.1031) disorder, disease, ailment, sickness, plague ([especially] leprosy), [Chāndogya-upaniṣad; Manu-smṛti; Mahābhārata] etc.

3) [v.s. ...] Disease personified (as a Child of Mṛtyu or Death), [Viṣṇu-purāṇa]

4) [v.s. ...] any tormenting or vexatious person or thing (ifc., e.g. strī-v, a plague of a woman, very troublesome woman), [Varāha-mihira’s Bṛhat-saṃhitā]

5) [v.s. ...] Costus Speciosus or Arabicus, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) Vyādhī (व्याधी):—[=vy-ā-dhī] f. (√1. dhī, or dhyai) care, sorrow, [Atharva-veda]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Vyādhin (व्याधिन्):—[from vyadh] 1. vyādhin mfn. piercing, perforating, [Vājasaneyi-saṃhitā]

2) [v.s. ...] 2. vyādhin mfn. ([from] vyadha) possessing (id est. frequented by) hunters, [Nalôd.]

3) [from vyā-dhā] 3. vyādhin mfn. (for 1, and 2. See p. 1031, col. 2) idem, [Monier-Williams’ Sanskrit-English Dictionary]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Vyādhi (व्याधि):—[vyā-dhi] (dhiḥ) 2. m. Sickness; leprosy.

Source: DDSA: Paia-sadda-mahannavo; a comprehensive Prakrit Hindi dictionary (S)

Vyādhi (व्याधि) in the Sanskrit language is related to the Prakrit word: Vāhi.

[Sanskrit to German]

Vyadhin in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Vyadhin in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Vyādhi (व्याधि):—(nf) a malady, disease, an ailment; ~[kara/janaka] causing an ailment/a malady; ~[grasta/pīḍita] ill, afflicted by a malady, ailing, diseased; ~[nāśaka/hara] countering or removing an ailment/malady; -[maṃdira] the physical frame (full of diseases); ~[mukta/rahita/śūnya] free from maladies/ailments; healthy; ~[yukta] afflicted by a malady, ill, ailing.

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Kannada-English dictionary

Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Vyādhi (ವ್ಯಾಧಿ):—

1) [noun] any disorder in the body; a departure from health; illnesss; a disease.

2) [noun] the plant Costus speciosus of Zingiberaceae family; sweet costus; elephant arrow root.

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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