Tila; 12 Definition(s)

Introduction

Tila means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Ayurveda (science of life)

Tila (तिल) is a Sanskrit word referring to Sesamum indicum (Sesame). It is a type of legume (śamīdhānya), according to Caraka in his Carakasaṃhitā sūtrasthāna (chapter 27), a classical Āyurvedic work. The plant Tila is part of the Śamīdhānyavarga group of medicinal plants, referring to the “group of legumes”. Caraka defined such groups (vargas) based on the dietic value of the plant. Tila is unctuous, hot, sweet, bitter, astringent and pungent in character. It is beneficial for the skin, hair and strength. It alleviates vāta and aggravates kapha and pitta.

Certain plant parts of Tila are eaten as a vegetable (śāka), according to the same chapter 27. The plant is therefore part of the Śākavarga group of medicinal plants, referring to the “group of vegetables/pot-herbs”. Caraka defined such groups (vargas) based on the dietic value of the plant.

According to the Rājanighaṇṭu (verse 16.111), Sesamum indicum (tila) has 7 synonyms: Homadhānya, Pavitra, Pitṛtarpaṇa, Pāpaghna, Pūtadhānya, Jaṭila, Vanodbhava.

Source: Wisdom Library: Āyurveda and botany
Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Tila (तिल) refers to “sesamum”, forming part of a common diet in ancient Kashmir (Kaśmīra) as mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa.—Tila (sesame) is recommended for Śrāddha, sacrifice, worship of the gods, as gift for the Brāhmaṇas, the crows etc. and as diet. White as well as black sesame are referred to in the Nīlamata (verses 482-83, 691-92). Most of the references to the articles of diet occur in the Nīlamata in connection with the offerings made to the gods but it is not difficult to infer from them the food and drink of the common people because “what a man eats his gods eat”.

Source: archive.org: Nilamata Purana: a cultural and literary study

Tila (तिल).—Seasamum1 much liked by piśācās;2 dear to the Pitṛs;3 havis of, in a śrāddha;4 dealer in, goes to hell;5 fit for gifts in vratas.6

  • 1) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa II. 7. 144; Vāyu-purāṇa 74. 5; 101. 162; 105. 12.
  • 2) Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa III. 7. 389, 409.
  • 3) Ib. III. 11. 5.
  • 4) Ib. III. 14. 11; 16. 17; 19. 3.
  • 5) Ib. IV. 2. 164.
  • 6) Matsya-purāṇa 7. 15; 15. 34; 82. 18; 83. 5; 87. 1; 187. 27-34; 217. 38; 239. 22.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Pancaratra (worship of Nārāyaṇa)

Tila (तिल) refers to “seasamum” and represents one of the seven village-corns that are fit for food-offerings according to verse 25.57 of the Īśvarasaṃhitā, dealing with the classification of the places for building the fire-pits (kuṇḍa). Accordingly, “rice (śāli), green gram (mudga), barley (yava), black gram (māṣa), wheat (godhūma), priyaṅgu (panic seed) and seasamum (tila)—these seven grown in the village are to be taken in the work of preparation of caru”.

Source: archive.org: Isvara Samhita Vol 5
Pancaratra book cover
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Pancaratra (पाञ्चरात्र, pāñcarātra) represents a tradition of Hinduism where Narayana is revered and worshipped. Closeley related to Vaishnavism, the Pancaratra literature includes various Agamas and tantras incorporating many Vaishnava philosophies.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Tila (तिल) denotes in the Atharvaveda and later the sesamum plant, and particularly its grains, from which a rich oil (Taila) was extracted. It is often mentioned in connexion with Māṣa, ‘kidney bean’. The Taittirīya-saṃhitā attributes the bean and the sesamum to the winter (hemanta) and the cool (śiśira) seasons. The stalk of the sesamum plant (tila-piñjī, til-piñja) was used for fuel, and the seed was boiled in the form of porridge (tilaudana) for food.

Source: archive.org: Vedic index of Names and Subjects

In Buddhism

General definition (in Buddhism)

Tila (तिल)—One of the field-crops mentioned in the Jātakas.

Source: Wisdom Library: Buddhism

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Tila (तिल, “sesamum”) refers to one of the seventeen varieties of dhānya (“grain”) according to Śvetāmbara tradition and listed in Hemacandra’s 12th century Yogaśāstra (verse 3.95). Dhānya represents one of the classes of the external (bahya) division of attachment (parigraha) and is related to the Aparigraha-vrata (vow of non-attachment).

Source: archive.org: Jaina Yoga
General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

tila : (nt.) the sesamum seed.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Tila, (m. nt.) (Vedic tila m. ) the sesame plant & its seed (usually the latter, out of which oil is prepared: see tela), Sesamum Indicum. Often combd with taṇḍula, e.g. A. I, 130=Pug. 32; J. I, 67; III, 53.—Vin. I, 212 (navātilā); A. IV, 108; Sn. p. 126; J. I, 392; II, 352; Vism. 489 (ucchu°); DhA. I, 79; PvA. 47 (tilāni pīḷetvā telavaṇijjaṃ karoti).

—odana rice with sesame J. III, 425; —kakka sesame paste Vin. I, 205; —tela ses. oil VvA. 54 (°ṃ pātukāma); DhA. III, 29; Bdhd 105; —piññāka tila seed-cake, oilcake VvA. 142; —piṭṭha sesamum-grinding, crushed s. seed Vin. IV, 341. —muṭṭhi a handful of ses. J. II, 278; —rāsi a heap of t. seeds VvA. 54; —vāha a cartload of t. seeds A. V, 173=Sn. p. 126; —saṅgulikā a ses. cake DhA. II, 75. (Page 304)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
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Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

ṭiḷā (टिळा).—m (tilaka S) The sectarial mark made with colored earths or unguents upon the forehead: also a mark drawn with any pigment upon the belly, arm &c. 2 An instrument to stamp or impress the sectarial line upon the forehead. ṭiḷā ṭōpī karaṇēṃ To trick one's self out with all the badges and insignia of sanctity. 2 To trick out one's self buckishly; to adonize. ṭiḷā vēśīsa lāvaṇēṃ To invite all the people of all castes of a village.

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tila (तिल).—m (S) Sesamum-plant, Sesamum orientale. 2 A seed of it. 3 A mole or freckle; a spot compared to a seed of sesamum. tilatulya, tilaprāya &c. with neg. con., answering to Pin's head, single grain, iota, jot, whit, tittle.

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tīḷa (तीळ).—m (tila S) Sesamum-seed. 2 fig. A mole or a freckle. tīḷa khāūna vrata mōḍaṇēṃ To commit an improper action for very little profit. tīḷatīḷa Just a bit; in a very little quantity: also by little and little. Ex. hēṃ auṣadha nitya tī0 khāta jā; Pr. śējīcī kēlī āsa āṇi tī0 tuṭē māsa; tī0 jīva tuṭatō. tīḷa m pl tuṭaṇēṃ g. of o. To have one's connection with broken off, i.e. to have tilāñjali with no longer. tīḷapāpaḍa hōṇēṃ g. of s. (Because tīḷa & pāpaḍa hop and skip about in the frying pan.) To be snappish or testy. tīḷa bhijata nāhīṃ (tōṇḍīṃ) Said of one who cannot keep a secret a single moment. tiḷīṃ asaṇēṃ g. of s. To be at the command or beck of. tiḷīṃ thēmba paḍaṇēṃ (To have a drop of sweat falling upon the tīḷa on the forehead.) To be inflamed with anger. tiḷīṃ yēṇēṃ g. of s. To come under the control of: also to be propitious or friendly unto. Ex. tīḷa khā tiḷīṃ yē gūḷa khā gōḍasēṃ bōla. tīḷabhara, tīḷaprāya, tīḷatulya A jot, whit, tittle, iota, grain, scruple.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

ṭiḷā (टिळा).—m The sectarial mark made with coloured earths or unguents upon the forehead. ṭiḷā ṭōpī karaṇēṃ To trick one's self out with all the badges and insig- nia of sanctity. To trick out one's self buckishly. ṭiḷā vēśīsa lāvaṇēṃ To invite all the people of all castes of a village.

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tila (तिल).—m Sesamum-plant; a seed of it; a mole.

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tīḷa (तीळ).—m Sesamum-seed; a mole. tīḷa khāūna vrata mōḍaṇēṃ Commit an improper action for very little profit. tīḷatīḷa Just a bit; by little and little. tīḷapāpaḍa hōṇēṃ Be snappish or testy. tīḷa bhijata nāhīṃ Said of one who cannot keep a secret a single moment. tiḷīṃ asaṇēṃ To be at the command or beck of. tiḷīṃ thēmba paḍaṇēṃ To be inflamed with anger. tiḷīṃ yēṇēṃ To be friendly. tīḷaprāya-bhara-tulya A jot, whit grain.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Tila (तिल).—[til-k]

1) The seasamum plant; नासाभ्येति तिलप्रसूनपदवीम् (nāsābhyeti tilaprasūnapadavīm) Gīt.1.

2) The seed of this plant; नाकस्मा- च्छाण्डिलीमाता विक्रीणाति तिलैस्तिलान् । लुञ्चितानितरैर्येन कार्यमत्र भविष्यति (nākasmā- cchāṇḍilīmātā vikrīṇāti tilaistilān | luñcitānitarairyena kāryamatra bhaviṣyati) || Pt.2.7.

3) A mole, spot.

5) A small particle, as much as a sesamum-seed; तिले तालं पश्यति (tile tālaṃ paśyati) 'makes mountains of molehills.'

Derivable forms: tilaḥ (तिलः).

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 238 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Tilottama
Tilottamā (तिलोत्तमा).—A prominent celestial maiden. Birth. Tilottamā was born to Pradhā, wife ...
Tilakalka
Tilakalka (तिलकल्क).—n. (-lkaṃ) Sesamum ground or bruised. E. tila, and kalka sediment.
Tilahoma
Tilahoma (तिलहोम).—n. (-maṃ) Burnt offering of sesamum. E. tila, and homa burnt offering.
Tilaparṇa
Tilaparṇa (तिलपर्ण).—turpentine. -rṇam sandal-wood. Derivable forms: tilaparṇaḥ (तिलपर्णः).Tila...
Tilakitta
Tilakiṭṭa (तिलकिट्ट).—f., Derivable forms: tilakiṭṭam (तिलकिट्टम्).Tilakiṭṭa is a Sanskrit comp...
Tilakanci
Tila Kanci is one of the places visited by Chaitanya during his pilgrimage in Southern India be...
Tilaparni
Tilaparṇī (तिलपर्णी).—f. (-rṇī) Red sanders, (Pterocarpus santolinus.) E. tila the sesamum plan...
Tiladhenu
Tiladhenu (तिलधेनु).—f. (-nuḥ) Sesamum made up in the shape of a cow, for the purpose of being ...
Tilacurna
Tilacūrṇa (तिलचूर्ण).—the caky sediment of sesamum after the oil is extracted; स्थाल्यां वैदूर्...
Tiladvadashi
Tiladvādaśī (तिलद्वादशी) is the name of a festival that once existed in ancient Kashmir (Kaśmīr...
Krishnatila
Kṛṣṇatila (कृष्णतिल) refers to one of the five varieties of tila (sesamum) according to verse 2...
Bhadava Tila
bhādavā tīḷa (भादवा तीळ) [or भादवी तीळ, bhādavī tīḷa].—m Sesamum that ripens in the month bhāda...
Pitatila
Pītatila (पीततिल) refers to one of the five varieties of tila (sesamum) according to verse 25.6...
Tilasneha
Tilasneha (तिलस्नेह).—n. (-haṃ) Oil, especially from sesamum. E. tila, and sneha grease.
Vanyatila
Vanyatila (वन्यतिल) refers to one of the five varieties of tila (sesamum) according to verse 25...

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