Tattva: 24 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Tattva means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Jainism, Prakrit, the history of ancient India, Marathi, Hindi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shilpashastra (iconography)

Source: Wisdom Library: Elements of Hindu Iconograpy

According to the Śaiva-siddhāntins there are three tatvas (realities) called Śiva, Sadāśiva and Maheśa and these are said to be respectively the niṣkalā, the sakalā-niṣkala and the sakalā aspects of god: the word kalā is often used in philosophy to imply the idea of limbs, members or form; we have to understand, for instance, the term niṣkalā to mean that which has no form or limbs; in other words, an undifferentiated formless entity.

Shilpashastra book cover
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Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Kubjikāmata-tantra

Tattva (कन्द, “principle-essence”):—Seventh seat of the Svādhiṣṭhāna (2nd chakra), according to the Kubjikāmata-tantra. It is identified with the last of the seven worlds, named satyaloka. Together, these seven seatsthey form the Brahmāṇḍa (cosmic egg). The Tattva seat refers to the inner triangle. This seat is also known as Piṇḍa (पिण्ड).

The associated dhātu (constituents of the physical body) is the Semen (retas).

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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Yoga (school of philosophy)

Source: Google Books: The Khecarividya of Adinatha

Ballāla mentions four systems of tattvas (तत्त्व):

  1. that described in the Nārāyaṇayogasūtravṛtti in which there are two types of tattva, jaḍa and ajaḍa, corresponding to the prakṛti and puruṣa of Sāṃkhya;
  2. a śākta system of twenty-five tattvas;
  3. a system said to be found in the Śaivāgamas comprising fifty tattvas, including the twenty-five just mentioned;
  4. and the (presumably twenty-five) tattvas described by Kapila in the Bhāgavatapurāṇa.

Ballāla adds that the system of fifty tattvas found in the Śaivāgamas has been described by him in the Yogaratnākaragrantha.

Yoga book cover
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Yoga is originally considered a branch of Hindu philosophy (astika), but both ancient and modern Yoga combine the physical, mental and spiritual. Yoga teaches various physical techniques also known as āsanas (postures), used for various purposes (eg., meditation, contemplation, relaxation).

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

1) Tattva (तत्त्व) refers to a variety of music to be produced from the vīṇā (musical instrument), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 29. The vīṇā refers to a musical instrument, inhibiting various dhātus (finger techniques).

According to the Nāṭyaśāstra, “the music which expresses properly the tempo, time-measure, varṇa, pada, yati, and syllables of the song, is called the tattva. The rule in the playing of musical instruments, is that the tattva is to be applied in a slow tempo. The experts in observing tempo and time-measure, should apply the tattva in the first song to be sound during a performance”.

2) Tattva (तत्त्व) refers to one of the three gatas: rules used in the playing of drums (puṣkara) [with reference to Mṛdaṅga, Paṇava and Dardura] according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 33. Accordingly, “in the tattva playing of drums there should be strokes similar to recognised syllables, distinctly expressing words and syllables, conforming to the metre of songs, and well-divided in karaṇas”.

Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Source: JSTOR: Tāntric Dīkṣā by Surya Kanta

Tattva (तत्त्व) or Tattvādhvā refers to one of the six adhvans being purified during the Kriyāvatī-dīkṣā: an important Śākta ritual described Śāradātilaka-tantra, chapters III-V.—“... Looking with the divine eye he transfers the caitanya of his disciple into himself and unites it with that of his own, thereby effecting a purification of the six adhvans namely: kalā, tattva, bhavana, varṇa, pada, and mantra”.

The word adhvā means ‘path’, and when the above six adhvans (viz. tattva) are purified they lead to Brahman-experience. Dīkṣā is one of the most important rituals of the Śāktas and so called because it imparts divine knowledge and destroys evil.

The tattvas are 36 according to the Śaivas, 32 according to Vaiṣṇavas and 24 according to Maitras.

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Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Source: archive.org: Shiva Purana - English Translation

Tattva (तत्त्व) refers to the “principles” that evolved out of the Mahātma (great soul), according to the Śivapurāṇa 2.1.6, while explaining the greatness of Rudrākṣa:—“[...] Viṣṇu, the weary person went to sleep amidst the waters. He was in that blissful state of delusion for a long time.54. As approved in the Vedas, his name came to be established as Nārāyaṇa (Having water as abode). Excepting for that Primordial Being there was nothing then. In the meantime, the Principles (tattva) too were evolved out of the Great soul (Mahātma)”.

From Prakṛti came into being the Mahat (cosmic Intellect), from Mahat the three Guṇas. Ahaṃkāra (the cosmic ego) arose therefrom in three forms according to the three Guṇas. The Essences, the five elements, the senses of knowledge and action too came into being then. [...] All these principles originating from Prakṛti are insentient. but not the Puruṣa. These principles are twenty-four in number.

Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Vaishnavism (Vaishava dharma)

Source: Pure Bhakti: Bhagavad-gita (4th edition)

Tattva (तत्त्व) refers to “fundamental truth”. (cf. Glossary page from Śrīmad-Bhagavad-Gītā).

Source: Pure Bhakti: Bhajana-rahasya - 2nd Edition

Tattva (तत्त्व) refers to:—Truths, reality, philosophical principles; the essence or substance of anything (e.g. the truths relating to bhakti are known as bhakti-tattva). (cf. Glossary page from Bhajana-Rahasya).

Source: Pure Bhakti: Brhad Bhagavatamrtam

Tattva (तत्त्व) refers to:—Truth; reality; axiomatic truth; fundamental element; conclusive truth; factual position; philosophical principles; principle; the essence or substance of anything (e.g. the truths relating to bhakti are known as bhakti-tattva). (cf. Glossary page from Śrī Bṛhad-bhāgavatāmṛta).

Vaishnavism book cover
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Vaishnava (वैष्णव, vaiṣṇava) or vaishnavism (vaiṣṇavism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshipping Vishnu as the supreme Lord. Similar to the Shaktism and Shaivism traditions, Vaishnavism also developed as an individual movement, famous for its exposition of the dashavatara (‘ten avatars of Vishnu’).

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Source: Veda (wikidot): Hinduism

Tattva (Sanskrit: "Truth, Reality or True Essence") from tad, that which is strictly speaking, there is only One Reality. That Reality is Brahman (the Supreme Being and Highest Truth), the Para-Tattva. This is the original teaching of all true Scriptures.

Tattvas are the primary principles, elements, states or categories of existence, the building blocks of the universe. The entire Universe consists of various manifestations of Brahman (the Universal Consciousness) which together form the basis of all our experiences. As these are just forms of Brahman (the Ultimate Reality), they are themselves called Primary Realities, Principles or Categories of Existence. In short, Tattvas.

Source: Dharma Inc: The 36 Tattvas of Śakta-Śaiva Dharma

A tattva is commonly translated into English as “element”.  However, the concept of tattva is better understood as a “state of being” or as a state of energy/experience.  These “states” are not independent realities or material, objective entities.  Tattva models attempt to describe and organize all that exists in our universe of matter/energy/consciousness. The number of tattvas is very flexible as they are all dependent on the first or Śiva.

The most commonly accepted models utilize a 36 tattva schema which is the re-interpreted samkhya 25 tattva model plus 11 more.  It is important to remember that the sages of Kashmir weren’t trying to say that the model is the reality it describes.  They were merely attempting to give the intellect a way to grasp reality beyond mind (meditation instructions).

In Jainism

General definition (in Jainism)

Source: archive.org: Trisastisalakapurusacaritra

1) Tattva (तत्त्व) refers to the “supreme principles”, according to chapter 1.1 [ādīśvara-caritra] of Hemacandra’s 11th century Triṣaṣṭiśalākāpuruṣacaritra (“lives of the 63 illustrious persons”): a Sanskrit epic poem narrating the history and legends of sixty-three important persons in Jainism.

Accordingly, “[...] [Dhana] saw Munis there, some engaged in meditation, some absorbed in silence, some engaged in kāyotsarga; some were reading aloud the scriptures, some were teaching, some sweeping the ground, some paying homage to their gurus, some discoursing on dharma, some expounding texts, some giving their approval (of the exposition), and some reciting the tattvas (supreme principles)”.

2) Tattva (तत्त्व) refers to seven principles, accordingly to the sermon of Anantanātha, according to chapter 4.4 [anantanātha-caritra].—Accordingly, as Anantanātha said:—“A creature ignorant of the principles, like a traveler who does not know the road, wanders in this wilderness of saṃsāra very hard to cross. Jīva (soul), ajīva (non-soul), āśrava (channels for acquiring karma), saṃvara (methods of impeding karma), nirjarā (destruction of karma), bandha (bondage) and mokṣa (emancipation) are said by wise men to be the seven tattvas (principles). [...]”.

Source: Encyclopedia of Jainism: Tattvartha Sutra 1

Tattva (तत्त्व).—What is the meaning of tattva in Jainsm? The nature (bhāva) of a substance is tattva. The categories of truth are also defined as tattva.

General definition book cover
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Jainism is an Indian religion of Dharma whose doctrine revolves around harmlessness (ahimsa) towards every living being. The two major branches (Digambara and Svetambara) of Jainism stimulate self-control (or, shramana, ‘self-reliance’) and spiritual development through a path of peace for the soul to progess to the ultimate goal.

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India history and geography

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Indian Epigraphical Glossary

Tattva.—(IE 7-1-2; EI 8), ‘twentyfive’; rarely also used to indicate ‘five.’ Note: tattva is defined in the “Indian epigraphical glossary” as it can be found on ancient inscriptions commonly written in Sanskrit, Prakrit or Dravidian languages.

India history book cover
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The history of India traces the identification of countries, villages, towns and other regions of India, as well as royal dynasties, rulers, tribes, local festivities and traditions and regional languages. Ancient India enjoyed religious freedom and encourages the path of Dharma, a concept common to Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

tattva (तत्त्व).—n Truth. Cream. Essential nature. tatvamasīśīṃ gāṇṭha ghālaṇēṃ To have an eye to the main chance.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Tattva (तत्त्व).—(Sometimes written as tatvam)

1) True state or condition, fact; वयं तत्त्वान्वेषान्मधुकर हतास्त्वं खलु कृती (vayaṃ tattvānveṣānmadhukara hatāstvaṃ khalu kṛtī) Ś.1. 23.

2) Truth, reality; न तु मामभिजानन्ति तत्त्वेनातश्च्यवन्ति ते (na tu māmabhijānanti tattvenātaścyavanti te) Bg.9.24.

3) True or essential nature; संन्यासस्य महाबाहो तत्त्वमिच्छामि वेदितुम् (saṃnyāsasya mahābāho tattvamicchāmi veditum) Bg.18.1;3.28; Ms.1.3;3.96; 5.42.

4) The real nature of the human soul or the material world as being identical with the Supreme Spirit pervading the universe.

5) A true or first principle.

6) An element, a primary substance; तत्त्वान्य- बुद्धाः प्रतनूनि येन, ध्यानं नृपस्तच्छिवमित्यवादीत् (tattvānya- buddhāḥ pratanūni yena, dhyānaṃ nṛpastacchivamityavādīt) Bk.1.18.

7) The mind.

8) Sum and substance.

9) Slow time in music.

1) An element or elementary property.

11) The Supreme Being.

12) A kind of dance.

13) The three qualities or constituents of every thing in nature (sattva, rajas and tamas).

14) The body; तत्त्वाभेदेन यच्छास्त्रं तत्कार्यं नान्यथाविधम् (tattvābhedena yacchāstraṃ tatkāryaṃ nānyathāvidham) Mb.12.267.9.

Derivable forms: tattvam (तत्त्वम्).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tattva (तत्त्व).—n.

(-ttvaṃ) 1. Essential nature, the real nature of the human soul, considered as one and the same with the divine spirit animating the universe: the philosophical etymology of this word best explains its meaning, tad that, that divine being, and tva thou, that very God art thou. 2. The Supreme being, or Bramha. 3. Truth, reality, substance, opposed to what is illusory or fallacious. 4. An element or elementary property, differently enumerated in different system from the three which are the same with the three Gunas, to twenty-seven, which include the elements, organs, faculties, matter, spirit, life, and God. 5. A first principle, an axiom. 6. Mind, intellect. 7. Slow time in music. 8. A musical instrument. E. As above, or tad that, then &c. affix tva; the word is properly, therefore, written tattva, but in books one ta is commonly rejected.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tattva (तत्त्व).— (often tatva), i. e. tad + tva, 1. The very essence, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 4, 92; [Bhagavadgītā, (ed. Schlegel.)] 18, 1. 2. Truth, [Śākuntala, (ed. Böhtlingk.)] [distich] 22. 3. A principle (especially the 25 of the Sānkhya philosophy), [Rāmāyaṇa] 3, 53, 42. Instr. tvena, 1. Truly, [Rāmāyaṇa] 1, 48, 13. 2. Thoroughly, [Mānavadharmaśāstra] 7, 68.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Tattva (तत्त्व).—[neuter] the state of being that, i.e. the true state or real nature; truth, reality, first principle (ph.). °—, [instrumental], & [adverb] in tas in truth, really, exactly.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Tattva (तत्त्व):—[=tat-tva] [from tat] n. true or real state, truth, reality, [Śvetāśvatara-upaniṣad; Manu-smṛti; Bhagavad-gītā] etc.

2) [v.s. ...] (in [philosophy]) a true principle (in Sāṃkhya [philosophy] 25 in number, viz. a-vyakta, buddhi, ahaṃ-kāra, the 5 Tan-mātras, the 5 Mahā-bhūtas, the 11 organs including manas, and, lastly, puruṣa, qq.vv.), [Mahābhārata xii, 11840; xiv, 984; Rāmāyaṇa iii, 53, 42; Tattvasamāsa]; 24 in number, [Mahābhārata xii, 11242; Harivaṃśa 14840] (m.); 23 in number, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa iii, 6, 2 ff.]

3) [v.s. ...] (for other numbers cf. [xi, 22, 1 ff.; Rāmatāpanīya-upaniṣad]; with Māheśvaras and Lokāyatikas only 5 viz. the 5 elements are admitted, [Prabodha-candrodaya ii, 18/19]; with, [Buddhist literature] 4, with Jainas 2 or 5 or 7 or 9 [Sarvadarśana-saṃgraha ii f.]; in Vedānta [philosophy] tattva is regarded as made up of tad and tvam, ‘that [art] thou’, and called mahā-vākya, the great word by which the identity of the whole world with the one eternal Brahma [tad] is expressed)

4) [v.s. ...] the, number 25 [Sūryasiddhānta ii]

5) [v.s. ...] the number 24 [Devī-bhāgavata-purāṇa; Śatapatha-brāhmaṇa vii, 3, 1, 43; Sāyaṇa]

6) [v.s. ...] an element or elementary property, [Horace H. Wilson]

7) [v.s. ...] the essence or substance of anything, [Horace H. Wilson]

8) [v.s. ...] the being that, [Jaimini i, 3, 24 [Scholiast or Commentator]]

9) [v.s. ...] = tata-tva, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

10) [v.s. ...] Name of a musical instrument, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

[Sanskrit to German] (Deutsch Wörterbuch)

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Böhtlingk and Roth Grosses Petersburger Wörterbuch

Tattva (तत्त्व):—(von tad) n.

1) das Verhältniss wie es ist, das wahre Verhältniss. - Wesen, die wahre Natur, Wahrheit, = svarūpa [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa 3, 3, 415.] [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha 2, 522. fgg.] [Medinīkoṣa v. 9.] saṃnyāsasya tattvamicchāmi veditum [Bhagavadgītā 18, 1.] tattvavit guṇakarmavibhāgayoḥ [3, 28.] ātma, brahma [ŚVETĀŚV. Upakośā 2, 14. 15.] kāryatattvārthavid [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 1, 3.] vedatattvārthavid [3, 96. 5, 42.] vedatattvārtham [4, 92.] vedaśāstrārthatattvajña [12, 102.] [Rāmāyaṇa 1, 1, 16.] gāndharvatattvajña [4, 11. 7, 11.] [Hitopadeśa 7, 20.] hayatattvajña [Arjunasamāgama 4, 37.] [Nalopākhyāna 19, 2.] ratnatattvajña [Kathāsaritsāgara 24, 177.] avekṣituṃ tattvam [Geschichte des Vidūṣaka 126.] tattvānveṣa [Śākuntala 22.] viditatattvā tacchakteḥ [Pañcatantra 75, 14.] tattvaniṣṭhatā (vācaḥ) [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 67.] tattvena dem wahren Verhältniss entsprechend, wie es sich in Wahrheit verhält, in Wahrheit, genau: na caināṃ veda tatrānyastattvena [Mahābhārata 4, 279.] [Bhagavadgītā 9, 24.] [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 7, 68.] ācakṣva bandhūṃśca ca patiṃ kulaṃ ca tattvena [Duaupadīpramātha 2, 5.] [Nalopākhyāna 16, 34.] [Rāmāyaṇa 1, 48, 13. 3, 77, 18.] tattvatas dass.: provāca tāṃ tattvato brahmavidyām [Muṇḍakopaniṣad 1, 2, 13.] kāryaṃ so vekṣya śaktiṃ ca deśakālau ca tattvataḥ [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 7, 10. 16. 154. 178. 8, 32 u.s.w.] [Bhagavadgītā 4, 9.] [Mahābhārata 4, 234.] [Rāmāyaṇa 1, 18, 10. 2, 21, 16.] [Śākuntala 11, 16.] [Prabodhacandrodaja 27, 11.] taṃ cāhaṃ tattvato nviṣya genau, sorgfältig [Mārkāṇḍeyapurāṇa 21, 37.] dharmatattvataḥ [Manu’s Gesetzbuch 8, 229.] tattvādhigataśāstrārtha [Suśruta 1, 123, 15.] In philos. Sinne Wahrheit, Realität, Grundprincip, deren nach den verschiedenen Systemen eine verschiedene Anzahl angenommen wird; = bhāva, padārtha, dharma, sattva, vastu [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa 3, 2, 21.] śūnyaṃ tattvam [Kapila 1, 44.] die 25 Tattva des Sāṃkhya (als Bez. der Zahl 25 [Sūryasiddhānta 2, 17. 31]) [Sânkhya Philosophy 1.] [Mahābhārata 12, 11840. 14, 984.] pañcapañcakatattvajña [Rāmāyaṇa 3, 53, 42.] yasyāpi devasya (śivasya) guṇāṃsamagrāṃstattvāṃścaturviṃśatimāhureke (m.! Als Bez. der Zahl 24 [Oxforder Handschriften 79], b, [24.] [Sāyaṇa] zu [The Śatapathabrāhmaṇa 7, 3, 1, 43]) [Harivaṃśa 14840.] [PURĀṆA][TANTRA im Śabdakalpadruma] trayoviṃśatitattvānāṃ gaṇam [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 3, 6, 2. 4.] 5 Tattva, näml. die fünf Elemente, bei den Māheśvara [Colebrooke I, 409.] pṛthivyaptejovāyavastattvāni (lokāyate śāstre) [Prabodhacandrodaja 27, 19.] mahattattva [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 3, 5, 27. 29.] ekatattvābhyāsa [Yogasūtra 1, 32.] vadanti tattattvavidastattvaṃ yajjñānamadvayam . brahmeti paramātmeti bhagavāniti śabdyate [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 1, 2, 11.] tattvajñāna [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 311.] [Sânkhya Philosophy 39.] Titel eines Werkes [Weber’s Indische Studien 2, 132.] tattva = paramātman [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa 3, 3, 415.] [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] [Medinīkoṣa] = brahman [Amarakoṣa 3, 4, 18, 117.] = cetas [Dharaṇīkoṣa im Śabdakalpadruma] Im Vedānta wird das Wort künstlich in tat tvam dieses du zerlegt, und durch diese Verbindung mahāvākya das grosse Wort genannt, die Identität der Welt (tvam), des nur in Folge einer Täuschung vielfach erscheinenden Brahman's, mit dem in Wahrheit einheitlichen Brahman (tad) ausgedrückt; vgl. [Madhusūdanasarasvatī’s Prasthānabheda] in [Weber’s Indische Studien 1, 20, 6.] [Weber’s Verzeichniss No. 614. 621. 624.] [Prabodhacandrodaja 114, 18. fgg.] und die Scholien dazu. —

2) das das-Sein; so erklärt z. B. der Schol. zu [Jaimini 1, 3, 24] arthasyānimittatvāt durch arthasya vākyārthajñānasya atat padārthajñānabhinnam nimittaṃ kāraṇaṃ yasya tattvāt; vgl. ebend. [25.] —

3) der langsame Tact [Amarakoṣa 1, 1, 7, 9.] [Trikāṇḍaśeṣa 3, 3, 415.] [Hemacandra’s Abhidhānacintāmaṇi 292.] [Medinīkoṣa] ein best. musikalisches Instrument (vādyabheda) [Hemacandra’s Anekārthasaṃgraha] [VIŚVA im Śabdakalpadruma]

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Tattva (तत्त्व):—

1) deren vierundzwanzig [Mahābhārata 12, 11242.] vier [WEBER, Rāmatāpanīya Upaniṣad 325. fg.] neun [325.] drei, vier, fünf, sechs, sieben, neun, eilf, dreizehn, sechszehn, siebenzehn, fünfundzwanzig und sechsundzwanzig [Bhāgavatapurāṇa 11, 22, 1. fgg.] vier bei den Buddhisten [SARVADARŚANAS. 20, 20. 23, 18.] zwei, fünf, sieben und neun bei den Jaina [33, 19. 35, 4. 36, 14. 41, 5.] [WILSON, Sel. Works 1, 306. fgg.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Sanskrit-Wörterbuch in kürzerer Fassung

Tattva (तत्त्व):—n. (adj. Comp. f. ā) —

1) das Verhältniss wie es ist , das wahre V. , — Wesen , die wahre Natur , Wahrheit. tattvena , tattvatas und tattva dem wahren Verhältniss entsprechend , wie es sich in Wahrheit verhält , in W. , der W. gemäss , genau , sorgfältig. Im philosophischen Sinne Wahrheit , so v.a. Realität , Grundprincip , deren nach den verschiedenen Systemen eine verschiedene Anzahl (gewöhnlich 25 oder

24) angenommen wird. Einmal m.

2) Bez. der Zahlen 25 und 24.

3) das Dassein.

4) *der langsame Tact.

5) *ein best. musikalisches Instrument.

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

Tattva (तत्त्व):—(nm) an element; essence; principle; substance; factor; phenomenon; truth, reality; ~[jña] a metaphysician, one who has realised the Supreme Truth; -[jñāna] metaphysical knowledge, the realisation of the Supreme Truth; ~[jñānī] see ~[jña; -darśana] realisation of the Supreme Truth; ~[darśī] one who realises the Supreme Truth; one who can perceive the Truth; -[dṛṣṭi] vision, truth-probing vision, insight; ~[niṣṭha] wedded to truth/essence; ~[mīmāṃsaka] metaphysicist; -[mīmāṃsā] Metaphysics; elementism; ~[mīmāṃsīya] metaphysical; ~[vid] see ~[jña; -vidyā] Metaphysics; ~[vettā] see ~[jña; -śāstra] see -[vidyā].

context information

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