Kriyavati, aka: Kriyāvatī; 2 Definition(s)

Introduction

Kriyavati means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Kriyavati in Shaktism glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kriyāvatī (क्रियावती) refers to the first of the four types of Dīkṣā: an important Śākta ritual described Śāradātilaka-tantra, chapters III-V.—The guru brings his disciple, who has cleansed his teeth and has eaten the five products of a cow near the kuṇḍa. Looking with the divine eye he transfers the caitanya of his disciple into himself and unites it with that of his own, thereby effecting a purification of the six adhvans namely: kalā, tattva, bhavana, varṇa, pada, and mantra. The word adhvā means ‘path’, and when the above six adhvans are purified they lead to Brahman-experience.

Again, looking with the divine eye the teacher transfers the caitanya of his disciple, present in him back to the disciple. The teacher then offers the Pūrṇāhuti with the ladle and repeats the mūlamantra. Oblations are offered to the tongues of the fire with Vyāhṛtis.

The guru then ties a piece of cloth over the eyes of his disciple and leads him to the kuṇḍa. The joined hands of the latter are filled with flowers which are then thrown in a pitcher for the gratification of the Devatā. The cloth is then taken off from his eyes. After worshipping the presiding deity of the kumbha the Guru performs several nyāsas. Then the teacher sprinkles the disciple with the water of the pitcher with accompaniment of instrumental music. The disciple is made to sip the remaining water. He then gets up, puts on new clothes, sips water and sits close to his guru silently. The latter than worships his Devatā and communicates the knowledge to the disciple, who recites the mantra mentally eight times. Thinking of the oneness of the guru the mantra and the Devatā he bows to the guru lying flat on the ground. He then places the feet of his guru on his head and offers him his own body and all that he possesses. Then a sacrificial fee is given to the priests and the Brāhmaṇas are gratified with food and fees. Thus ends the Kriyāvatī-dīkṣā.

Source: JSTOR: Tāntric Dīkṣā by Surya Kanta
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context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

Kriyavati in Shaivism glossary... « previous · [K] · next »

Kriyāvatī (क्रियावती) refers to a type of Hautrī-dīkṣā where dīkṣā refers to “initiation” performed by a healthy Ādiśaiva as part of his essential priestly duties in the Śiva temple.—Dīkṣā is popularly understood as “dīyate kṣīyate iti dīkṣā”—“that which grants mokṣa, while destroying the karma of the initiate”. Hautrī-dīkṣā referst to dīkṣā where the process involves agnikārya performed according to the rules. Hautrī-dīkṣā is further classified into jñānavatī-dīkṣā, where the agnikārya is performed internally and kriyāvatī-dīkṣā, where the rituals are performed externally. Kriyāvatī-dīkṣā is once again classified into sabīja-dīkṣā, with bījamantra and nirbīja-dīkṣā, without bījamantra.

Source: Shodhganga: Temple management in the Āgamas
Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 33 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Kala
Kāla (काल) refers to the God of “death and time” and is stationed at Kālātīta, as defined in th...
Pada
Pada (पद).—(= Pali id.), sentence, complete utterance, in contrast with nāman, word, and vyañja...
Varna
Varṇa (वर्ण, “color”) refers to “color karma” and represents one of the various kinds...
Mantra
Mantra (मन्त्र) refers to “mystic syllables” and is associated with the worship of a deity (pūj...
Shanti
Śānti (शान्ति) or Śāntika refers to “expelling evil” which is accomplished by performing mantra...
Vidya
Vidyā (विद्या).—f. (-dyā) 1. Knowledge, learning, science, whether sacred or profane, though mo...
Pratishtha
Pratiṣṭhā (प्रतिष्ठा) refers to “infusing life into the temple” as defined in the Śaivāgamas.—P...
Nirbija
Nirbīja (निर्बीज) refers to a type of Kriyāvatī-dīkṣā, which in turn represents a type of ...
Diksa
Dīkṣā (दीक्षा, “initiation”) is performed by a healthy Ādiśaiva as part of his essential priest...
Tattva
Tattva.—(IE 7-1-2; EI 8), ‘twentyfive’; rarely also used to indicate ‘five.’ Note: tattva is de...
Nivritti
Nivṛtti (निवृत्ति).—f. (-ttiḥ) 1. Cessation, completion, leaving off, rest, repose. 2. Disconti...
Bhuvana
1) Bhuvana (भुवन).—A Mahaṛṣi who visited Bhīṣma when he was lying on the verge of death. (Mahāb...
Adhvan
Adhvan (अध्वन्).—m. (-dhvā) 1. A road. 2. Fixing, placing. 3. Time. 4. Assault. 5. Correcting v...
Sadhikara
Sādhikāra (साधिकार) refers to a type of Lokadharminī-dīkṣā, which is a type of Sabīja-dīkṣā, wh...
Shivadharmini
Śivadharminī (शिवधर्मिनी) refers to a type of Sabīja-dīkṣā, which is a type of Kriyāvatī-d...

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