Vina, aka: Vinā, Vīṇā, Vīnā; 23 Definition(s)

Introduction

Vina means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Buddhism, Pali, the history of ancient India, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

Vīṇā (वीणा): a Musical Instrument.—The Ṛgveda mentions that Kṣoṇī or Viṇā was the musical instrument of the Maruts. The Jātakas shed more light on the construction, size and use of this instrument. It was very popular in the period of the Jātakas. In the Rāmāyaṇa it is a favourite instrument of the songsters, and similar is the case with the Mahābhārata. Kauṭilya also mentions it. The Vāyu-purāṇa refers to Vīṇā at four places mostly associating it with Śiva and the Kurus. Of Śiva it was a pet instrument.

Source: Google Books: Cultural History from the Vāyu Purāna

Vīṇā (वीणा) refers to a “musical instruments” that existed in ancient Kashmir (Kaśmīra) as mentioned in the Nīlamatapurāṇa.—The Nīlamata says that the land of Kaśmīra was thronged with ever-sportive and joyful people enjoying continuous festivities. Living amidst scenes of sylvan beauty they played, danced and sang to express their joys, to mitigate their pains, to please their gods and to appease their demons.

The Nīlamata refers to Vīṇā thrice only but if the references to Tantrī-vādya be taken as referring to vīṇā, it will yield that vīṇā was resorted to most by the musicians of Kaśmīra. The modern hundredstringed santoor of Kaśmīra is probably śatatantrīvīṇā or vāṇa referred to in the Taittirīya Saṃhitā.

Source: archive.org: Nilamata Purana: a cultural and literary study

Vīṇā (वीणा).—Lute;1 presented by Sarasvatī to Skanda;2 in the garland of Umeśa, figures of apsaras with vīṇās3 in Pātālam4 in Rāma's abhiṣeka.5

  • 1) Vāyu-purāṇa 54. 35.
  • 2) Ib. 72. 46.
  • 3) Matsya-purāṇa 260. 20.
  • 4) Viṣṇu-purāṇa II. 5. 11.
  • 5) Ib. IV. 4. 100.
Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index
Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shilpashastra (iconography)

Vīnā (वीना, “lute”):—In Hindu iconology (śilpaśāstra), this symbol represents mastery of skills (in performing arts). The sound of the Vīnā represents creativity, which is the power of consciousness to express itself. It is also one of the items Īśāṇa is displayed carrying, who is a Vedic deity and represents the embodiment of all learning.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śilpa-śāstra

Vīṇā (वीणा).—It consists of a long hollow semi-cylidrical body with a number of keys on its sides. From each of these keys proceeds a string ofr wire which is stretched over the long body of the instrument and tied at the lower end. At this lower end is a square sounding box, and to the upper end a hollow gourd is attached to server as a resonator. It is played with the left hand by passing the fingers lightly over the strings and pressing them down a little in required positions. The right hand plucks the various strings periodically to suit the requirements of the musician.

Source: Google Books: Elements of Hindu iconography

Vīṇā (वीणा, “flute”).—An object being held by the four-armed Sarasvatī;—The vīṇā as Sarasvatī’s dominant, distinguishing iconographic feature found consistently in her representations to this day is of overwhelming importantce. We have already seen the instrument in connection with Vāc in the Brāhmaṇa myth of the Barter for Soma. Amongst the earlier Purāṇas, Sarasvatī’s association with the vīṇā appears also in the Vāyu-purāṇa 72.46, where she presents no kless than a ‘great-sounding great vīṇā’ to Skanda.

The Viṣṇudharmottara-purāṇa states that the vīṇā is to be known as accomplishment embodied.

Source: Google Books: Sarasvatī: Riverine Goddess of Knowledge (iconography)

Vīnā (Lute) - Music, singing, dancing. Inner sound of spiritual harmony; the vibration of the atoms in motion, creation, the sound of the spheres, the harmony of all the diffuse elements of the cosmos.

Source: Red Zambala: Hindu Icons and Symbols | Devi

Vīnā (Lute) - Inner sound of spiritual harmony; the vibration of the atoms in motion, creation, the sound of the spheres, the harmony of all the diffuse elements of the cosmos. Music and dancing — the arts.

Source: Red Zambala: Hindu Icons and Symbols | Introduction

Vīṇā refers to a “stringed instrument”, representing one of the several “attributes” (āyudha) or “accessories” of a detiy commonly seen depicted in Hindu iconography, defined according to texts dealing with śilpa (arts and crafs), known as śilpaśāstras.—The śilpa texts have classified the various accessories under the broad heading of āyudha or karuvi (implement), including even flowers, animals, and musical instruments. The musical instruments held in the hands of deities are, for example, Vīṇā.

Vīṇā consists of a long hollow semi-cylindrical body with a number of keys on its sides. From each of these keys proceeds a string or wire, which is stretched over the long body of the instrument and tied at the lower end. At this lower end is a square sounding box, and to the upper end a hollow gourd is attached to serve as a resonator. It is played with the left hand by passing the fingers lightly over the strings and pressing them down a little in required positions. The right hand plucks the various strings periodically to suit the requirements of the musician.

Source: Shodhganga: The significance of the mūla-beras (śilpa)
Shilpashastra book cover
context information

Shilpashastra (शिल्पशास्त्र, śilpaśāstra) represents the ancient Indian science (shastra) of creative arts (shilpa) such as sculpture, iconography and painting. Closely related to Vastushastra (architecture), they often share the same literature.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

Vīnā (वीना, “lute”).—One of the symbols that Sarasvatī is depicted as holding in one of her hands. It symbolizes the inner sound of spiritual harmony.

Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism

Vīṇā (वीणा) or Vīṇātantra refers to one of the twenty-three Vāmatantras, belonging to the Śāktāgama (or Śāktatantra) division of the Āgama tradition. The Śāktāgamas represent the wisdom imparted by Devī to Īśvara and convey the idea that the worship of Śakti is the means to attain liberation. According to the Pratiṣṭhālakṣaṇasamuccaya of Vairocana, the Śāktatantras are divided into to four parts, the Vīṇā-tantra belonging to the Vāma class.

Source: Shodhganga: Iconographical representations of Śiva (shaktism)
Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Natyashastra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Vīṇā (वीणा) refers to a musical instrument, inhibiting various dhātus (finger techniques), according to the Nāṭyaśāstra chapter 29. The four dhātus relate to different aspects of strokes in playing stringed instruments (tata).

The Vīṇā produces three types of sound:

  1. tattva,
  2. anugata,
  3. ogha .
Source: Wisdom Library: Nāṭya-śāstra

Vīṇā (वीणा), one of the most beautiful instruments of Indian classical music, is not only associated with Goddess Sarasvatī, it is also the constant companion of the celestial sage Nārada, who is ubiquitous with the chanting of Lord Nārāyaṇa’s name in the three worlds... and Rudra-vīṇā, another variety of the instrument is associated with Rudradeva who is none else than, Lord Śaṅkara Himself.

The Vīṇā which used to be the common instrument of Indian music was superseded by the ‘Sitār’, ‘Sarod’ and ‘Sāraṅgī’ in the North, instruments not played at all by South Indian musicians. There the ‘vīṇā’ remains the queen of all classical music instruments.

Source: Google Books: The Quest for Music Divine

Vīṇā (वीणा, “lute”) was a stringed (tat) instrument. It was the principal instrument dominating the musical orchestra. Two kinds of vīṇās are mentioned in Nāṭyaśāstra: vipañcī and citrā. The former had nine strings and was played with a plektrum. The latter had seven strings and was probably played with the strokes of fingers.

Source: Google Books: Sanskrit Play Production in Ancient India
Natyashastra book cover
context information

Natyashastra (नाट्यशास्त्र, nāṭyaśāstra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition (śāstra) of performing arts, (nāṭya, e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nataka) and poetic works (kavya).

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Kosha (encyclopedic lexicons)

Vīṇā (वीणा).—The Aitareya-āraṇyaka (3.2.5) says that the body is a sound-producing organism akin to the vīṇā, a musical instrument. Indeed, the vīṇā is essentially an imitation of the body which produces musical sound (cf. Śāṅkhāyana-āraṇyaka 8.9)

Source: Google Books: Kalātattvakośa
context information

Kosha (कोश, kośa) refers to Sanskrit lexicons intended to provide additional information regarding technical terms used in religion, philosophy and the various sciences (shastra). The oldest extant thesaurus (kosha) dates to the 4th century AD.

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General definition (in Hinduism)

Vīṇā (वीणा).—Besides the singing or chanting of the Sāma-veda, instrumental music formed part of the Vedic sacrifices as well, the most important insttrument being the vīṇā, or lute, which was often played by the wife of the sacrificer. A recent study of the vīṇā has found it compared to the human body in the Aitareya-āraṇyaka.

Source: Google Books: Sonic Theology: Hinduism and Sacred Sound

Languages of India and abroad

Pali-English dictionary

vinā : (ind.) without

-- or --

vīṇā : (f.) a lute.

Source: BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary

Vinā, (indecl.) (Vedic vinā=vi-nā (i.e. “not so”), of pron. base Idg. *no (cp. nānā “so & so”), as in Sk. ca-na, Lat. ego-ne, pō-ne behind, etc. See na1) without, used as prep. (or post-position) with (usually) Instr. e.g. Vin. II, 132 (vinā daṇḍena without a support); PvA. 152 (purisehi vinā without men); or Abl. e.g. Sn. 589 (ñāti saṅghā vinā hoti is separated from his relatives; cp. BSk. vinābhavati MVastu I. 243); or Acc. e.g. Mhvs 3, 10 (na sakkā hi taṃ vinā). In compn vinā-bhāva separation (cp. BSk. vinābhāva MVastu II. 141) Sn. 588, 805; Nd1 122; J. III, 95; IV, 155; V, 180; VI, 482 (=viyoga C.). (Page 624)

— or —

Vīṇā, (f.) (cp. Vedic vīṇā) the Indian lute, mandoline S. I, 122=Sn. 449 (kacchā bhassati “let the lyre slide down from hollow of his arm” K. S. I. 153); Th. 1, 467; S. IV, 196 (six parts); A. III, 375; J. III, 91; V, 196, 281 (named Kokanada “wolf’s howl”); VI, 465=580; Vv 6419; 8110; Miln. 53 (all its var. parts); VvA. 138, 161, 210; PvA. 151.—vīṇaṃ vādeti to play the lute Mhvs 31, 82; ThA. 203.

—daṇḍaka the neck of a lute J. II, 225. —doṇikā the sounding board of a lute (cp. doṇī1 4) Vism. 251; VbhA. 234; KhA 45. (Page 643)

Source: Sutta: The Pali Text Society's Pali-English Dictionary
Pali book cover
context information

Pali is the language of the Tipiṭaka, which is the sacred canon of Theravāda Buddhism and contains much of the Buddha’s speech. Closeley related to Sanskrit, both languages are used interchangeably between religions.

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Marathi-English dictionary

viṇā (विणा).—m (Properly vīṇā q.v.) The Win̤a or Indian lute.

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viṇā (विणा).—prep (Properly vinā q.v.) Without: also except.

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vinā (विना).—prep (S) Without. vinākāraṇa Without cause or reason; vinādhāra Without foundation or support; vināparādha Without offence or fault. 2 Except. pōṭāvinā-viṇā-vīṇa-vāñcūna or annāvinā-&c. To employ or use without boarding or feeding (a servant, a beast); vastrāvinā &c. (...without clothing).

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vīṇa (वीण).—f (viṇēṃ) Littering: also the birth, brood, or litter. 2 The season or regular period of bringing forth.

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vīṇa (वीण).—f ī ē (viṇaṇēṃ) Texture, weftage, any particular texture, with respect whether to the manner of weaving, or to the quality or the form of the web.

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vīṇa (वीण).—prep (vinā S) Without: also except. See vinā.

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vīṇā (वीणा).—f (S) The Win̤a or Indian lute. It is a fretted instrument of the guitar kind, usually having seven wires or strings, and a large gourd at each end of the finger-board. There are many varieties.

Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

vinā (विना).—prep Without. vinākāraṇa Without cause.

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vīṇa (वीण).—f Littering. The birth. Texture. prep Without.

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vīṇā (वीणा).—f The Indian lute.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English
context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vina (विन).—1 P. To bend oneself, stoop, be bent; विनमन्ति चास्य तरवः प्रचये (vinamanti cāsya taravaḥ pracaye) Ki.6.34; Bh.1.67; Bk.7.52. -Caus.

1) To bend (a bow).

2) (In gram.) To change into a cerebral letter.

Derivable forms: vinam (विनम्).

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Vinā (विना).—ind.

1) Without, except (with acc., instr. or abl.); यथा तानं विना रागो यथा मानं विना नृपः । यथा दानं विना हस्ती तथा ज्ञानं विना यतिः (yathā tānaṃ vinā rāgo yathā mānaṃ vinā nṛpaḥ | yathā dānaṃ vinā hastī tathā jñānaṃ vinā yatiḥ) Bv.1.119; पङ्कैर्विना सरो भाति सदः खलजनैर्विना कटुवर्णैर्विना काव्यं मानसं विषयैर्विना (paṅkairvinā saro bhāti sadaḥ khalajanairvinā kaṭuvarṇairvinā kāvyaṃ mānasaṃ viṣayairvinā) 1.116; विना वाहनहस्तिभ्यः क्रियतां सर्वमोक्षः (vinā vāhanahastibhyaḥ kriyatāṃ sarvamokṣaḥ) Mu. 7; Śi.2.9. (vinākṛ means 'to leave, abandon, bereave, deprive of'; madanena vinākṛtā ratiḥ Ku.4.21 'bereft of Cupid').

2) In the absence of; विना वचनेन अन्त्यलोप एव न्याय्यः (vinā vacanena antyalopa eva nyāyyaḥ) ŚB. on MS. 1.5.6.

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Vīṇā (वीणा).—

1) The (Indian) lute; मूकीभूतायां वीणायाम् (mūkībhūtāyāṃ vīṇāyām) K.; उत्सङ्गे वा मलिनवसने सौम्य निक्षिप्य वीणाम् (utsaṅge vā malinavasane saumya nikṣipya vīṇām) Me.88.

2) Lightning.

3) A particular configuration of stars.

Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Vinā (विना).—Ind. Without, except. E. vi privative, aff.

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Vīṇā (वीणा).—f.

(-ṇā) 1. The Vina, or Indian lute, a fretted instrument of the guitar kind, usually having seven wires or strings, and a large gourd at each end of the finger board; the extent of the instrument is two octaves: it is supposed to be the invention of Narada, the son of Brahma, and has many varieties, enumerated according to the number of strings, &c. 2. Lightning. E. to go, &c., Unadi aff. na, form irr.; or aj-nak vībhāvaḥ pṛṣo0 ṇatvam .

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary
context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Relevant definitions

Search found 387 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Vinokti
Vinokti (विनोक्ति).—f. (-ktiḥ) The rhetorical use of the word, ‘without’ as, kā niśā śaśinā vin...
Brahmavina
Brahmavīṇā (ब्रह्मवीणा).—a particular Vīṇā. Brahmavīṇā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the...
Vinavada
Vīṇāvāda (वीणावाद).—m. (-daḥ) A player on the Vina, a lutanist. E. vīṇā a lute, and vāda who ca...
Rudravina
Rudravīṇā (रुद्रवीणा).—a kind of lute. Rudravīṇā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms...
Vinabhava
Vinābhava (विनाभव) or Vinābhāva (विनाभाव).—separation; न सुहृद्भिर्विनाभवः (na suhṛdbhirvinābha...
Vinatantra
Vīṇātantra (वीणातन्त्र) or simply Vīṇā refers to one of the twenty-three Vāmatantras, belonging...
Kandavina
Kāṇḍavīṇā (काण्डवीणा).—the lute of a Chāṇḍāla. Kāṇḍavīṇā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of t...
Sutravina
Sūtravīṇā (सूत्रवीणा).—a kind of lute. Sūtravīṇā is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms...
Vinapani
Vīṇāpāṇi (वीणापाणि).—Name of Nārada. Derivable forms: vīṇāpāṇiḥ (वीणापाणिः).Vīṇāpāṇi is a Sansk...
Vinapraseva
Vīṇāpraseva (वीणाप्रसेव).—the damper on a lute. Derivable forms: vīṇāprasevaḥ (वीणाप्रसेवः).Vīṇ...
Vinasya
Vīṇāsya (वीणास्य).—an epithet of Nārada. Derivable forms: vīṇāsyaḥ (वीणास्यः).Vīṇāsya is a Sans...
Dantavina
Dantavīṇā (दन्तवीणा).—1) a kind of musical instrument or harp. 2) chattering of the teeth; दन्त...
Alabuvina
Alābuvīṇā (अलाबुवीणा) or Alābūvīṇā (अलाबूवीणा).—A lute of the shape of a gourd.Alābuvīṇā is a S...
Vinavadaka
Vīṇāvādaka (वीणावादक).—a lutanist.Derivable forms: vīṇāvādakaḥ (वीणावादकः).Vīṇāvādaka is a Sans...
Vinadanda
Vīṇādaṇḍa (वीणादण्ड).—the neck of a lute; न हि तुम्बीफलविकलो वीणादण्डः प्रयाति महिमानम् (na hi ...

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