Simhamukha, aka: Simha-mukha, Siṃhamukha; 3 Definition(s)

Introduction

Simhamukha means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Nāṭyaśāstra (theatrics and dramaturgy)

Siṃhamukha (सिंहमुख).—One of the Twenty-eight Single Hands (hasta):—Siṃha-mukha (lion-face): the tips of the middle and third fingersare applied to the thumb, the rest extended. Usage: coral, pearl, fragrance, stroking the hair, a drop of water, salvation (mokṣa) when placed on the heart, homa, hare, elephant, waving kusa grass, lotus garland, lion-face, testing the preparationof medicine.

(Source): archive.org: The mirror of gesture (abhinaya-darpana)
Nāṭyaśāstra book cover
context information

Nāṭyaśāstra (नाट्यशास्त्र, natya-shastra) refers to both the ancient Indian tradition of performing arts, (e.g., theatrics, drama, dance, music), as well as the name of a Sanskrit work dealing with these subjects. It also teaches the rules for composing dramatic plays (nāṭya) and poetic works (kāvya).

Dhanurveda (science of warfare)

Siṃhamukha (सिंहमुख) refers to a kind of weapon (lion-mouth-shaped missile). It is a Sanskrit word defined in the Dhanurveda-saṃhitā, which contains a list of no less than 117 weapons. The Dhanurveda-saṃhitā is said to have been composed by the sage Vasiṣṭha, who in turn transmitted it trough a tradition of sages, which can eventually be traced to Śiva and Brahmā.

(Source): Wisdom Library: Dhanurveda
Dhanurveda book cover
context information

Dhanurveda (धनुर्वेद) refers to the “knowledge of warfare” and, as an upaveda, is associated with the Ṛgveda. It contains instructions on warfare, archery and ancient Indian martial arts, dating back to the 2nd-3rd millennium BCE.

In Buddhism

Mahayana (major branch of Buddhism)

Siṃhamukha (सिंहमुख) is the name of a ‘river mouth’ (mukha) into which the lake Anavatapta flows from its northern corner, according to the Mahāprajñāpāramitāśāstra (chapter XIV). Accordingly, At the northern boundaries (of Jambudvīpa), in the Snowy Mountains (Himavat), there is lake called Anavatapta. At the four corners of the lake there are four mouths from which the water flows out: at the north, the Lion’s Mouth (Che tseu t’eou = siṃhamukha). In the north, the Lion’s Mouth empties into the Sseu t’o (Sītā). Its bed also consists of golden sand (suvarānavālukā). The Sītā comes from the mountain in the north and empties into the northern ocean (uttarasamudra).

(Source): Wisdom Library: Maha Prajnaparamita Sastra
Mahayana book cover
context information

Mahayana (महायान, mahāyāna) is a major branch of Buddhism focusing on the path of a Bodhisattva (spiritual aspirants/ enlightened beings). Extant literature is vast and primarely composed in the Sanskrit language. There are many sūtras of which some of the earliest are the various Prajñāpāramitā sūtras.

Relevant definitions

Search found 314 related definition(s) that might help you understand this better. Below you will find the 15 most relevant articles:

Simhasana
Siṃhāsana (सिंहासन, “lion-seat”).—What is this siṃhāsana? The lion in question is not a real li...
Mukha
Mukha (मुख, “mouth”) refers to that part of the human body from which the Buddha emitted numero...
Simha
siṃha (सिंह).—m (S) A lion. 2 A sign of the zodiac, Leo. 3 In comp. The chief or principal. Ex....
Gomukha
Gomukha (गोमुख) is the son of Ityaka (a minister of Udayana), according to the Kathāsaritsāgara...
Adhomukha
adhōmukha (अधोमुख).—a (S) adhōvadana a (S adhaḥ Down, & mukha & vadana Face.) With the face dow...
Shrimukha
śrīmukha (श्रीमुख).—n Illustrious countenance. śrīmukhānta dēṇēṃ To slap the face.
Kartarimukha
Kartarīmukha (कर्तरीमुख, “scissors’ blades”).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) m...
Talamukha
Talamukha (तलमुख).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made with dance-hands (nṛttahasta);&mdas...
Katakamukha
Kaṭakāmukha (कटकामुख, “elephant-apple”).—A type of gesture (āṅgika) made w...
Ashvamukha
Aśvamukha (अश्वमुख) is the name of a ‘river mouth’ (mukha) into which the lake Anavatapta flows...
Mukharaga
mukharāga (मुखराग).—m (S) The liveliness, lightness, or lustre of the countenance; clearness or...
Sakata-mukha
Sakaṭa-mukha the front or opening of the waggon, used as adj. “facing the waggon or th...
Simhapura
Simhabahu became the king of Lāta country and built a city named Simhapura. Most probably, Simh...
Mukhasandhi
Mukhasandhi (मुखसन्धि).—The “dramatic juncture of the introduction or protasis” in which an ini...
Mukhalinga
The mukhaliṅga (मुखलिङ्ग) is one of the varieties of mānuṣa-liṅgas and is distinguished from...

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