Shankhini, Śaṅkhiṇī, Śaṅkhinī, Śaṅkhini: 20 definitions

Introduction:

Shankhini means something in Buddhism, Pali, Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi, Hindi, biology. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit terms Śaṅkhiṇī and Śaṅkhinī and Śaṅkhini can be transliterated into English as Sankhini or Shankhini, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Shankhini in Purana glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: The Matsya-purāṇa

Śaṅkhinī (शङ्खिनी) is the name of a mind-born ‘divine mother’ (mātṛ), created for the purpose of drinking the blood of the Andhaka demons, according to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.8. The Andhaka demons spawned out of every drop of blood spilled from the original Andhakāsura (Andhaka-demon). According to the Matsya-purāṇa 179.35, “Most terrible they (e.g., Śaṅkhinī) all drank the blood of those Andhakas and become exceedingly satiated.”

The Matsyapurāṇa is categorised as a Mahāpurāṇa, and was originally composed of 20,000 metrical verses, dating from the 1st-millennium BCE. The narrator is Matsya, one of the ten major avatars of Viṣṇu.

Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Śaṅkhinī (शङ्खिनी).—A sacred spot at Kurukṣetra. A bath in the Devītīrtha there will add to one’s beauty. (Vana Parva, Chapter 83, Verse 51).

2) Śaṅkhinī (शङ्खिनी).—Wife of Mahāśaṅkha, a crocodile. (For details see under Mahāśaṅkha).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

1) Śaṅkhini (शङ्खिनि).—A śakti on the fourth parvan of the Kiricakra.*

  • * Brahmāṇḍa-purāṇa IV. 20. 15; 44. 60; Matsya-purāṇa 286. 10.

2) Śaṅkhinī (शङ्खिनी).—The Goddess from the back portion of Nṛsimha; follower of Vāgīśī.*

  • * Matsya-purāṇa 179. 23. 68.
Purana book cover
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The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Shankhini in Shaivism glossary
Source: academia.edu: Yakṣiṇī-sādhana in the Kakṣapuṭa tantra

Śaṅkhiṇī (शङ्खिणी) is the name of one of the thirty-two Yakṣiṇīs mentioned in the Kakṣapuṭatantra, as well as one of the thirty-six Yakṣiṇīs mentioned in the Uḍḍāmareśvaratantra. In the yakṣiṇī-sādhana, the Yakṣiṇī is regarded as the guardian spirit who provides worldly benefits to the practitioner. The Yakṣiṇī (e.g., Śaṅkhiṇī) provides, inter alia, daily food, clothing and money, tells the future, and bestows a long life, but she seldom becomes a partner in sexual practices.

Source: Brill: Śaivism and the Tantric Traditions

Śaṃkhiṇī (शंखिणी) (or Śaṃkhā) is the name of an internal Nāḍī (subtle channel) symbolizing the external rosary (śaṃkha).—According to the Tantrasadbhāva, the performative acts and paraphernalia of ritual have superior, inner (adhyātma) equivalents: the outer (bāhya) finds its true meaning in the inner processes of yoga. Thus, for instance, in the section of Tantrasadbhāva (chapter 6), the external rosary made of conch (śaṃkha) has as its inner form the subtle śaṃkhā or śaṃkhiṇī channel (nāḍī) of the yogic anatomy, which extends into the crown of the head.

Shaivism book cover
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Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Ayurveda (science of life)

[«previous next»] — Shankhini in Ayurveda glossary

Nighantu (Synonyms and Characteristics of Drugs and technical terms)

Source: WorldCat: Rāj nighaṇṭu

Śaṅkhinī (शङ्खिनी) is another name for Yavatiktā, a medicinal plant identified with Andrographis paniculata (creat or green chireta) from the Acanthaceae or “acanthus family” of flowering plants, according to verse 3.76-78 of the 13th-century Raj Nighantu or Rājanighaṇṭu. The third chapter (guḍūcyādi-varga) of this book contains climbers and creepers (vīrudh). Together with the names Śaṅkhinī and Yavatiktā, there are a total of sixteen Sanskrit synonyms identified for this plant.

Ayurveda book cover
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Āyurveda (आयुर्वेद, ayurveda) is a branch of Indian science dealing with medicine, herbalism, taxology, anatomy, surgery, alchemy and related topics. Traditional practice of Āyurveda in ancient India dates back to at least the first millenium BC. Literature is commonly written in Sanskrit using various poetic metres.

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Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Shankhini in Shaktism glossary
Source: Google Books: Manthanabhairavatantram

Śaṅkhinī (शङ्खिनी) refers to the “energy within the channel of Suṣumṇā”, according to the Manthānabhairavatantra, a vast sprawling work that belongs to a corpus of Tantric texts concerned with the worship of the goddess Kubjikā.—Accordingly, [while describing the Niṣkala Form of Śrīnātha]—“[...] (He holds) a conch that makes the sound of the creation of the universe and is fearsome with the (Unstruck) Sound of Śaṅkhinī (the energy within the channel of Suṣumṇā). [...]”.

Source: Kamakoti Mandali: The Yoginis of Narasimha Vyuha

Śaṅkhinī (शङ्खिनी) refers to one of the various Nṛsiṃha Yoginīs or Śaktis created for the purpose of pacifying the Rudraśaktis.—Accordingly, [...] Rudra meditated on Mahānṛsiṃha. Pleased with Rudra’s prayers, Narasiṃha created four Vyūhaśaktis [Vāgīśvarī, Mahāmāyā, Bhagamālinī and Atibhadrakālī=Śuṣkarevatī]. The Lord created a group of Nṛsiṃha Yoginīs [viz., Śaṅkhinī] to accompany the three main Śaktis. All of them, under the command of Śuṣkarēvatī, attacked the Rudraśaktis, subdued them and pacified them to attain benevolence.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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In Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana or tantric Buddhism)

Source: academia.edu: A Critical Study of the Vajraḍākamahātantrarāja (II)

Śaṅkhinī (शङ्खिनी) refers to one of three types of women, according to the Vajraḍākatantra chapter 38.—The text strictly prohibits a Yogin from raping every kind of Dūtīs and insists that the Dūtīs should be perfected by pleaseure (sukha). Having enumerated three types of the women (Citriṇī, Plīvī and Śaṅkhinī), five techniques to please Dūtīs as well as the Yogin himself and to enlarge a Yogin’s gentials are introduced.

Source: academia.edu: The Structure and Meanings of the Heruka Maṇḍala

1) Śaṅkhinī (शङ्खिनी) is the name of a Ḍākinī who, together with the Vīra (hero) named Śaṅkhin forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Guṇacakra, according to the 10th century Ḍākārṇava chapter 15. Accordingly, the guṇacakra refers to one of the four divisions of the sahaja-puṭa (‘innate layer’), situated within the padma (lotus) in the middle of the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs [viz., Śaṅkhinī] and Vīras are whitish red in color; they each have one face and four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife.

Note: Śaṅkhinī’s name is Śaṅkhakī in Jayasena’s Ratnapadmarāganidhi (D 1516, 27 v 2)

2) Śaṅkhinī (शङ्खिनी) is also the name of a Ḍākinī who, together with the Vīra (hero) named Śaṅkha forms one of the 36 pairs situated in the Jñānacakra, according to the same work. Accordingly, the jñānacakra refers to one of the three divisions of the saṃbhoga-puṭa (‘enjoyment layer’), situated in the Herukamaṇḍala. The 36 pairs of Ḍākinīs [viz., Śaṅkhinī] and Vīras are white in color; the shapes of their faces are in accordance with their names; they have four arms; they hold a skull bowl, a skull staff, a small drum, and a knife.

Source: Wisdom Experience: The Nyingma School of Tibetan Buddhism

Śaṅkhinī (शङ्खिनी) refers to one of the four classes of Ḍākinīs (Tibetan: rigs-bzhi mkha’-’gro-ma), according to the Guhyagarbhatattvaviniścayamahātantra and its XIVth Century Tibetan Commentary: Phyogs-bcu munsel (pp. 961-7 and n. 14)..—In this context, the term may refer to ḍākinīs of the four peripheral enlightened families, i.e. the Jewel, Lotus, Action, and Buddha or Vajra families; or to ḍākinīs belonging to four of the six classes, i.e. Padminī, Śaṅkhinī, Mṛginī, Hastinī, Varṇinī and Citriṇī.

Tibetan Buddhism book cover
context information

Tibetan Buddhism includes schools such as Nyingma, Kadampa, Kagyu and Gelug. Their primary canon of literature is divided in two broad categories: The Kangyur, which consists of Buddha’s words, and the Tengyur, which includes commentaries from various sources. Esotericism and tantra techniques (vajrayāna) are collected indepently.

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Biology (plants and animals)

[«previous next»] — Shankhini in Biology glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Local Names of Plants and Drugs

Sankhini [संखिनी] in the Sanskrit language is the name of a plant identified with Blastania cerasiformis (Stocks) A.Meeuse from the Cucurbitaceae (Pumpkin) family having the following synonyms: Ctenolepis cerasiformis, Bryonia fimbristipula, Zehneria cerasiformis. For the possible medicinal usage of sankhini, you can check this page for potential sources and references, although be aware that any some or none of the side-effects may not be mentioned here, wether they be harmful or beneficial to health.

Sankhini in the Sanskrit language is the name of a plant identified with Euphorbia dracunculoides Lam. from the Euphorbiaceae (Castor) family having the following synonyms: Euphorbia lanceolata, Tithymalus dracunculoides.

Shankhini [ಶಂಖಿನಿ] in the Kannada language is the name of a plant identified with Chrysopogon aciculatus (Retz.) Trin. from the Poaceae (Grass) family having the following synonyms: Andropogon aciculatus, Andropogon acicularis.

Shankhini [ଶଙ୍ଖିନୀ] in the Oriya language is the name of a plant identified with Andrographis paniculata (Burm. fil.) Nees from the Acanthaceae (Acanthus) family having the following synonyms: Justicia paniculata .

Source: Google Books: CRC World Dictionary (Regional names)

Sankhini in India is the name of a plant defined with Clitoria ternatea in various botanical sources. This page contains potential references in Ayurveda, modern medicine, and other folk traditions or local practices It has the synonym Lathyrus spectabilis Forssk. (among others).

Example references for further research on medicinal uses or toxicity (see latin names for full list):

· Fl. Senegal (1954)
· Inst. Rei Herb. (1766)
· Moscosoa (1990)
· A Numerical List of Dried Specimens (5347)
· Bot. Commelins (1983)
· Mémoires de la Société Linnéenne de Paris (1826)

If you are looking for specific details regarding Sankhini, for example extract dosage, side effects, diet and recipes, health benefits, pregnancy safety, chemical composition, have a look at these references.

Biology book cover
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This sections includes definitions from the five kingdoms of living things: Animals, Plants, Fungi, Protists and Monera. It will include both the official binomial nomenclature (scientific names usually in Latin) as well as regional spellings and variants.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shankhini in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

śaṅkhinī (शंखिनी).—f (S) pop. śaṅkhīṇa f A description of woman, one of the four classes into which females are divided. The Shankini is described as tall, with long hair, and of irascible disposition and strong passions. 2 Applied revilingly to a cow that yields but little milk. 3 A sort of sea-snail; popularly gōgalagāya.

Source: DDSA: The Aryabhusan school dictionary, Marathi-English

śaṅkhinī (शंखिनी).—f One of the 4 divisions of woman-kind.

context information

Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shankhini in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Śaṅkhinī (शङ्खिनी).—

1) A woman of one of the four classes into which writers on erotic science divide women; the Ratimañjarī thus describes her :-दीर्घातिदीर्घनयना वर- सुन्दरी या कामोपभोगरसिका गुणशीलयुक्ता । रेखात्रयेण च विभूषित कण्ठदेशा सम्भोगकेलिरसिका किल शङ्खिनी सा (dīrghātidīrghanayanā vara- sundarī yā kāmopabhogarasikā guṇaśīlayuktā | rekhātrayeṇa ca vibhūṣita kaṇṭhadeśā sambhogakelirasikā kila śaṅkhinī sā) || cf. चित्रिणी, हस्तिनी (citriṇī, hastinī), and पद्मिनी (padminī) also.

2) A female spirit, or a kind of fairy.

3) Mother of pearl.

4) A particular vein.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Edgerton Buddhist Hybrid Sanskrit Dictionary

Śaṅkhinī (शङ्खिनी).—name of a rākṣasī: Mahā-Māyūrī 241.13.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Śaṅkhiṇī (शङ्खिणी):—[from śaṅkhin > śaṅkha] f. See next.

2) Śaṅkhinī (शङ्खिनी):—[from śaṅkha] f. of [preceding]

3) [v.s. ...] mother of pearl, [Bālarāmāyaṇa]

4) [v.s. ...] a [particular] plant, [Suśruta; Caraka; Śārṅgadhara-saṃhitā] ([according to] to [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.] Andropogon Aciculatus, Cissampelos Hexandra = śveta-cukrā, śveta-puṃnāga, and śveta-vṛndā)

5) [v.s. ...] a [particular] vein (nāḍī), [Catalogue(s)]

6) [v.s. ...] Name of one of the four classes into which females are divided (the other three being citriṇī, padminī, and hastinī), [Religious Thought and Life in India 389]

7) [v.s. ...] Name of a Śakti worshipped by Buddhists, [Kālacakra]

8) [v.s. ...] a kind of semidivine being or fairy (upadevatā-viśeṣa), [Horace H. Wilson]

9) [v.s. ...] Name of a Tīrtha, [Mahābhārata]

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Hindi dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shankhini in Hindi glossary
Source: DDSA: A practical Hindi-English dictionary

1) Śaṃkhinī (शंखिनी) [Also spelled shankhini]:—(nf) one of the four major categories of women according to ancient Indian sexologists.

2) Shankhini in Hindi refers in English to:—(nf) one of the four major categories of women according to ancient Indian sexologists..—shankhini (शंखिनी) is alternatively transliterated as Śaṃkhinī.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Shankhini in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Śaṃkhini (ಶಂಖಿನಿ):—

1) [noun] a kind of semi-divine being or fairy.

2) [noun] the shell of some oysters or other vivalve mollusks, in which pearls are formed.

3) [noun] name of an astral tube, in the body, carrying prāṇa (nerve current).

4) [noun] the grass Andropogon aciculatus ( = Chrysopogon aciculatus) of Poaceae family.

5) [noun] the plant Cissampelos hexandra.

6) [noun] one of the four classes into which women are divided (as per the science of erotica).

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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