Mahashankha, Mahāśaṅkha, Maha-shankha, Mahashamkha: 13 definitions

Introduction:

Mahashankha means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

The Sanskrit term Mahāśaṅkha can be transliterated into English as Mahasankha or Mahashankha, using the IAST transliteration scheme (?).

In Hinduism

Purana and Itihasa (epic history)

[«previous next»] — Mahashankha in Purana glossary
Source: archive.org: Puranic Encyclopedia

1) Mahāśaṅkha (महाशङ्ख).—A crocodile celebrated in the Purāṇas. He had a wife named Śaṅkhinī. The seven children born to Śaṅkhinī became the Maruts in the Svārociṣa Manvantara. There is a story in Chapter 72, Vāmana Purāṇa about these children who became Maruts.

Ṛtadhvaja, son of Svārociṣa Manu had seven heroic sons. They went to Mahāmeru and began to worship Brahmā for gaining Indra’s place. Indra was alarmed. He sent the Apsarā woman Pūtanā to the sons of Ṛtadhvaja to obstruct their tapas. There was a river flowing by the side of their āśrama. Ṛtadhvaja’s sons came to the river to take their bath. Just at that time, Pūtanā also came there and began to take bath. At her sight, the young men had an involuntary emission of semen. Śaṅkhinī, wife of the crocodile Mahāśaṅkha swallowed it. The princes whose tapas was interrupted returned to the palace. Pūtanā returned to Indra and reported the matter.

After some years, Śaṅkhinī happened to be caught in a fisherman’s net. The fisherman caught her and informed Ṛtadhvaja’s sons about his catch. They took her to the palace and put her in a tank there. In due course Śaṅkhinī gave birth to seven children. Immediately after that she attained mokṣa. The children began to cry for mother’s milk, moving about in the water. Then Brahmā appeared to them and told them not to cry and assured them that they would become the Devas of "Vāyu Skandha". He took them up to the sky and put them in Vāyuskandha. These children were the Maruts of the Svārociṣa Manvantara.

2) Mahāśaṅkha (महाशङ्ख).—A Nāga. Bhāgavata, 10th Skandha says that this Nāga revolves along with the sun in the month of Mārgaśīrṣa.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: The Purana Index

Mahāśaṅkha (महाशङ्ख).—A chief Nāga of Pātāla; a thousand hooded snake; presiding over the month, saha.*

  • * Bhāgavata-purāṇa V. 24. 31; XII. 11. 41; Matsya-purāṇa 6. 40.
Source: JatLand: List of Mahabharata people and places

Mahāśaṅkha (महाशङ्ख) is a name mentioned in the Mahābhārata (cf. IX.36.20) and represents one of the many proper names used for people and places. Note: The Mahābhārata (mentioning Mahāśaṅkha) is a Sanskrit epic poem consisting of 100,000 ślokas (metrical verses) and is over 2000 years old.

Purana book cover
context information

The Purana (पुराण, purāṇas) refers to Sanskrit literature preserving ancient India’s vast cultural history, including historical legends, religious ceremonies, various arts and sciences. The eighteen mahapuranas total over 400,000 shlokas (metrical couplets) and date to at least several centuries BCE.

Discover the meaning of mahashankha or mahasankha in the context of Purana from relevant books on Exotic India

Rasashastra (chemistry and alchemy)

[«previous next»] — Mahashankha in Rasashastra glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Rasa-śāstra

Mahāśankha (महाशन्ख) is the name of an Ayurvedic recipe defined in the fourth volume of the Rasajalanidhi (chapter 4, ajīrṇa: indigestion). These remedies are classified as Iatrochemistry and form part of the ancient Indian science known as Rasaśāstra (medical alchemy). However, since it is an ayurveda treatment it should be taken with caution and in accordance with rules laid down in the texts.

Accordingly, when using such recipes (e.g., mahāśankha-rasa): “the minerals (uparasa), poisons (viṣa), and other drugs (except herbs), referred to as ingredients of medicines, are to be duly purified and incinerated, as the case may be, in accordance with the processes laid out in the texts.” (see introduction to Iatro chemical medicines)

Rasashastra book cover
context information

Rasashastra (रसशास्त्र, rasaśāstra) is an important branch of Ayurveda, specialising in chemical interactions with herbs, metals and minerals. Some texts combine yogic and tantric practices with various alchemical operations. The ultimate goal of Rasashastra is not only to preserve and prolong life, but also to bestow wealth upon humankind.

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Languages of India and abroad

Sanskrit dictionary

[«previous next»] — Mahashankha in Sanskrit glossary
Source: DDSA: The practical Sanskrit-English dictionary

Mahāśaṅkha (महाशङ्ख).—

1) a great conch-shell; पौण्ड्रं दध्मौ महाशङ्खं (pauṇḍraṃ dadhmau mahāśaṅkhaṃ) Bg.1.15; महाशङ्खमयी माला ताराविद्याजपे प्रिया (mahāśaṅkhamayī mālā tārāvidyājape priyā) Tantra.

2) the temporal bone, forehead.

3) a human bone.

4) a particular high number.

5) one of Kubera's treasures.

Derivable forms: mahāśaṅkhaḥ (महाशङ्खः).

Mahāśaṅkha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mahā and śaṅkha (शङ्ख).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Shabda-Sagara Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahāśaṅkha (महाशङ्ख).—m.

(-ṅkhaḥ) 1. A human bone. 2. The forehead. 3. A thousand millions. 4. One of Kuvera'S Nidhis or treasures. 5. A great conch-shell. E. mahā great, śaṅkha a shell, a number, &c.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Benfey Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahāśaṅkha (महाशङ्ख).—m. 1. the forehead. 2. a thousand millions. 3. one of Kuvera's treasures.

Mahāśaṅkha is a Sanskrit compound consisting of the terms mahā and śaṅkha (शङ्ख).

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Cappeller Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahāśaṅkha (महाशङ्ख).—[masculine] a great conch-shell.

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Monier-Williams Sanskrit-English Dictionary

1) Mahāśaṅkha (महाशङ्ख):—[=mahā-śaṅkha] [from mahā > mah] m. a great conch-shell, [Mahābhārata]

2) [v.s. ...] the temporal bone, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

3) [v.s. ...] a human bone, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

4) [v.s. ...] a [particular] high number (= 10 Nikharvas), [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

5) [v.s. ...] one of Kubera’s treasures, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

6) [v.s. ...] Name of a serpent-demon, [Bhāgavata-purāṇa]

7) [v.s. ...] mn. the frontal bone, [cf. Lexicographers, esp. such as amarasiṃha, halāyudha, hemacandra, etc.]

Source: Cologne Digital Sanskrit Dictionaries: Yates Sanskrit-English Dictionary

Mahāśaṅkha (महाशङ्ख):—[mahā-śaṅkha] (ṅkhaḥ) 1. m. A human bone; the forehead; 1,000 millions; a treasure of Kuvera or Plutus.

[Sanskrit to German]

Mahashankha in German

context information

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family (even English!). Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin.

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Kannada-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Mahashankha in Kannada glossary
Source: Alar: Kannada-English corpus

Mahāśaṃkha (ಮಹಾಶಂಖ):—

1) [noun] the forehead.

2) [noun] any of the human bones.

3) [noun] (myth.) one of of the nine treasures of Kubēra, the Regent of Wealth.

4) [noun] a cardinal number (1 followed by nineteen zeros).

context information

Kannada is a Dravidian language (as opposed to the Indo-European language family) mainly spoken in the southwestern region of India.

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