Avaranapuja, Āvaraṇapūjā, Avarana-puja: 3 definitions

Introduction

Introduction:

Avaranapuja means something in Hinduism, Sanskrit, Marathi. If you want to know the exact meaning, history, etymology or English translation of this term then check out the descriptions on this page. Add your comment or reference to a book if you want to contribute to this summary article.

In Hinduism

Shaktism (Shakta philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Avaranapuja in Shaktism glossary
Source: Wisdom Library: Śāktism

Āvaraṇapūjā (आवरणपूजा):—The sanskrit name for a tantric ritual translating to “Worship of the Circuit of Goddesses”.

Shaktism book cover
context information

Shakta (शाक्त, śākta) or Shaktism (śāktism) represents a tradition of Hinduism where the Goddess (Devi) is revered and worshipped. Shakta literature includes a range of scriptures, including various Agamas and Tantras, although its roots may be traced back to the Vedas.

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Shaivism (Shaiva philosophy)

[«previous next»] — Avaranapuja in Shaivism glossary
Source: Shodhganga: Temple management in the Āgamas

Āvaraṇapūjā (आवरणपूजा) refers to “worshipping the Devatās that have been invoked”, representing a certain ceremony to be performed during pūjā (ritualistic worship), according to the Arcanāvidhipaṭala of Kāmikāgama.—[After Upacāra], the Ācārya then bows to the Lord and with his permission, commences the āvaraṇapūjā, or worshipping the other Devatās that have been invoked. This can be compared to first attending to the chief guest and then attending to his retinue.

In the first āvaraṇa or the first circle, the Ācārya worships the five mūrtis of Īśāna, Tatpuruṣa, Aghora, Vāmadeva and Sadyojāta visualizing them appropriately and using the corresponding mantra. There are also specific colours associated with each mantra and mūrti. Then the Ācārya worships the navaśakti and Manonmanī, the primordial śakti who sits in the lap of the Lord.

In the second āvaraṇa, the Ācārya worships the eight Vidyeśvaras in the eight directions, visualizing them in their corresponding forms—Ananta in the East, Sūkṣma in the South, Śivottama in the West, Ekanetra in the North, Ekarudra in the North-East (Īśānya), Trimūrti in the South-East (Āgneya), Śrīkaṇṭha in the South-West (Nirṛti) and Śikhaṇḍi in the North-West (Bāyu) directions.

In the third āvaraṇa, the Ācārya worships the Prathama-gaṇeśvara in the eight directions in their respective forms and vāhana—Ambikā in the North, Candeśa in the North-East, Nandi in the East, Mahākāla in the South-East, Vināyaka in the South, Ṛṣabhadeva in the South-West, Bhṛṅgi in the West and Subrahmaṇya in the North-West directions.

In the fourth āvaraṇa, the Ācārya worships the Digpālaka in their respective forms, riding their respective vāhaṇa—Indra in the East, Agni in the South-East, Yama in the South, Nirṛti in the South-West, Varuṇa in the West, Vāyu in the North-West, Kubera in the North and Īśānamūrti in the North-East directions. Viṣṇu is worshipped in the downward direction and Brahma upwards toward the sky.

In the fifth āvaraṇa, the Ācārya worships the Astrasamūha, or the weapons of the fourth āvaraṇa deities—Vajra in the East, Śakti in the South-East, Daṇḍa in the South, Sword in the South-West, Pāśa in the West, Dhvaja in the North-West, Gadā in the North and Śūla in the North-East directions. Cakra is worshipped below and Lotus above.

Shaivism book cover
context information

Shaiva (शैव, śaiva) or Shaivism (śaivism) represents a tradition of Hinduism worshiping Shiva as the supreme being. Closely related to Shaktism, Shaiva literature includes a range of scriptures, including Tantras, while the root of this tradition may be traced back to the ancient Vedas.

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Languages of India and abroad

Marathi-English dictionary

[«previous next»] — Avaranapuja in Marathi glossary
Source: DDSA: The Molesworth Marathi and English Dictionary

āvaraṇapūjā (आवरणपूजा).—f (S) Worship of the āvaraṇa- dēvatā (encircling court of deities), and, in particular, of the divinities (viz. the ḍākinī, śaṅkhinī, bhūtēṃ &c.) attendant upon dēvī or śivaśakti, upon certain occasions.

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Marathi is an Indo-European language having over 70 million native speakers people in (predominantly) Maharashtra India. Marathi, like many other Indo-Aryan languages, evolved from early forms of Prakrit, which itself is a subset of Sanskrit, one of the most ancient languages of the world.

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